Tag Archives | Health

Exercise Can Outweigh Harmful Effects of Air Pollution

Kevin Dooley (CC BY 2.0)

Kevin Dooley (CC BY 2.0)

Via ScienceDaily:

New research from the University of Copenhagen has found that the beneficial effects of exercise are more important for our health than the negative effects of air pollution, in relation to the risk of premature mortality. In other words, benefits of exercise outweigh the harmful effects of air pollution.

The study shows that despite the adverse effects of air pollution on health, air pollution should be not perceived as a barrier to exercise in urban areas. “Even for those living in the most polluted areas of Copenhagen, it is healthier to go for a run, a walk or to cycle to work than it is to stay inactive,” says Associate Professor Zorana Jovanovic Andersen from the Centre for Epidemiology and Screening at the University of Copenhagen.

The research results have been published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

Air pollution a barrier to exercise?

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A dark night is good for your health

Joe Goldberg (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Joe Goldberg (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Richard Stevens, University of Connecticut

Today most people do not get enough sleep. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has called insufficient sleep an epidemic. While we are finally paying attention to the importance of sleep, the need for dark is still mostly ignored.

That’s right. Dark. Your body needs it too.

Being exposed to regular patterns of light and dark regulates our circadian rhythm. Disruption of this rhythm may increase the risk of developing some health conditions including obesity, diabetes and breast cancer

Light regulates our sleep and wake patterns

The physiological processes that control the daily cycle of sleep and wake, hunger, activity levels, body temperature, melatonin level in the blood, and many other physiological traits are called the endogenous circadian rhythm.

On its own, the endogenous circadian rhythm is nearly, but not exactly, 24 hours. Our bodies rely on the Sun to reset this cycle and keep it at precisely 24 hours, the length of our days.… Read the rest

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The War Over Vaping’s Health Risks Is Getting Dirty

Why people think vaping could be good (or at least benign) for your health I’m not sure, but in any event there’s money involved, hence the dirty war described by Wired:

For nicotine enthusiasts, 2015 will be remembered as part of a golden era. Less than 10 years after they were introduced in the United States, e-cigarettes have gone relatively unregulated by health agencies, with companies and users making their own rules in a nicotine-laced Wild West. E-cigarette companies have been advertising their products to adults and children alike, claiming to help smokers quit while simultaneously promoting lollipop-flavored liquids. But now health organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and even city-based public health departments are starting to fight back—not in the form of regulations, but with their own media campaigns.

510N e-cigarette and e-liquids

It’s a tough fight to pick. Nationwide, more than 20 million people—about one in 10 adults—have tried e-cigarettes, and plenty of those people have become vaping devotees.

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1000-year-old Remedy Kills MRSA Superbug

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This article was sent to us by a reader. He asks, “How did ancient people have this knowledge?”

A medieval remedy of leeks, garlic, wine, and the bile of a cow’s stomach was used as an “eyesalve” circa the 10th Century. Scientists have recently discovered, much to everyone’s surprise, that this salve is also effective against antibiotic-resistant MRSA.

via New Scientist:

Sourcing authentic ingredients was a major challenge, says Harrison. They had to hope for the best with the leeks and garlic because modern crop varieties are likely to be quite different to ancient ones – even those branded as heritage. For the wine they used an organic vintage from a historic English vineyard.

As “brass vessels” would be hard to sterilise – and expensive – they used glass bottles with squares of brass sheet immersed in the mixture. Bullocks gall was easy, though, as cow’s bile salts are sold as a supplement for people who have had their gall bladders removed.

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Mastering the Mind and Body Through Meditation, Jiu-Jitsu and Ayahuasca with Nicolas Gregoriades| the midwest real podcast

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Nic Gregoriades is a world-traveling, ayahuasca-drinking, elite Jiu-Jitsu black belt. He’s founder of the Jiu-Jitsu Brotherhood and co-host of The Journey Podcast.

Via Midwest Real

“Life is not a problem to be solved, it is a mystery to be lived” – Osho 

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What a mind-blasting reminder that is, “life is not a problem.” So many of our personal shortcomings, issues and anxieties stem from just such a mindset- living life as if it’s a series of problems to be solved. Over the centuries, we’ve questioned and tinkered with what life is and what it “means” so much that we’ve condemned ourselves to a poisonous abyss of paradigms, expectations and momentum.

Overcoming that conditioning isn’t about running off into the woods and becoming a Luddite. We can’t just climb out of the proverbial pandora’s box of knowledge, stimulation, passion and competition we’re immersed in. But, there’s a beautifully simple escape sitting right behind the eyeballs you’re using to stare at this screen.… Read the rest

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Hidden Hazards Found in ‘Green’ Products

Valerie Everett (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Valerie Everett (CC BY-SA 2.0)

via The University of Melbourne:

A University of Melbourne researcher has found that common consumer products, including those marketed as ‘green’, ‘all-natural’, ‘non-toxic’, and ‘organic’, emit a range of compounds that could harm human health and air quality. But most of these ingredients are not disclosed to the public.

Dr. Anne Steinemann, Professor of Civil Engineering, and the Chair of Sustainable Cities, from the Department of Infrastructure Engineering, Melbourne School of Engineering, is a world expert on environmental pollutants, air quality, and health effects.

Professor Steinemann investigated and compared volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 37 different products, such as air fresheners, cleaning products, laundry supplies, and personal care products, including those with certifications and claims of ‘green’ and ‘organic’. Both fragranced and fragrance-free products were tested.

The study, published in the journal Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health found 156 different VOCs emitted from the 37 products, with an average of 15 VOCs per product.

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Racism Linked to Infant Mortality and Learning Disabilities

Janell Ross writes at the Root:

A pair of Emory University studies released this year have connected the large share of African-American children born before term with the biologically detectable effects of stress created in women’s bodies after decades of dealing with American racism. As shocking as that itself may sound, the studies’ findings don’t end there.

Racism, and its ability to increase the odds that a pregnant mother will deliver her child early, can kill. There is also evidence that racism can alter the capacity for a child to learn and distorts lives in ways that can reproduce inequality, poverty and long-term disadvantage, the studies found.

“Racism is an incredibly powerful force,” said Elizabeth Corwin, dean of research at Emory University’s Woodruff School of Nursing,

In 2012, a stunning 11.5 percent of American children were born preterm, the medical community’s shorthand for a child who spends 38 weeks or less in their mother’s womb.

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Coca-Cola Pays Nutrition Experts to Recommend Coke as a Healthy Snack

Beverley Goodwin (CC BY 2.0)

Beverley Goodwin (CC BY 2.0)

In light of dwindling Coke sales in the US, Coca-Cola has begun partnering with fitness and nutrition “experts” to recommend Coke as a healthy snack.

Ethics…

The AP via Mashable:

If a column in honor of heart health suggests a can of Coke as a snack, you might want to read the fine print.

The world’s biggest beverage maker, which struggles with declining soda consumption in the U.S., is working with fitness and nutrition experts who suggest its cola as a healthy treat. In February, for instance, several wrote online pieces for American Heart Month, with each including a mini-can of Coke or small soda as a snack idea.

The mentions — which appeared on nutrition blogs and other sites including those of major newspapers — show the many ways food companies work behind the scenes to cast their products in a positive light, often with the help of third parties who are seen as trusted authorities.

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How to Teach Doctors Empathy

Eva Blue (CC BY 2.0)

Eva Blue (CC BY 2.0)

Sandra G. Boodman writes at The Atlantic:

The patient was dying and she knew it. In her mid-50s, she had been battling breast cancer for years, but it had spread to her bones, causing unrelenting pain that required hospitalization. Jeremy Force, a first-year oncology fellow at Duke University Medical Center who had never met the woman, was assigned to stop by her room last November to discuss her decision to enter hospice.

Employing the skills he had just learned in a day-long course, Force sat at the end of her bed and listened intently. The woman wept, telling him she was exhausted and worried about the impact her death would have on her two daughters.

“I acknowledged how hard what she was going through was,” Force said of their 15-minute conversation, “and told her I had two children, too,” and that hospice was designed to provide her additional support.

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The Failure of Modern Industrial Agriculture

Matthias Ripp (CC By 2.0)

Matthias Ripp (CC By 2.0)

John Ikerd writes at Dollars & Sense:

Americans are being subjected to an ongoing multimillion-dollar propaganda campaign designed to “increase confidence and trust in today’s agriculture.” Food Dialogues, just one example of this broader trend, is a campaign sponsored by the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance—an industry organization whose funders and board members include Monsanto, DuPont, and John Deere. The campaign features the “faces of farming and ranching”—articulate, attractive young farmers, obviously chosen to put the best possible face on the increasingly ugly business of industrial agriculture, which dominates our food- production system.

Genetically engineered crops, inhumane treatment of farm animals, and routine feeding of antibiotics to confined animals—among many other problems—have eroded public trust in American agriculture. In response, the defenders of so-called modern agriculture have employed top public relations firms to try to clean up their tarnished public image. Their campaigns emphasize such issues as water quality, food safety, animal welfare, and “food prices and choices.”

Mounting public concerns in each of these areas are supported by a growing body of scientific evidence.

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