Tag Archives | Health

What It’s Like to Die 36 Times in One Year

János Csongor Kerekes (CC BY-ND 2.0)

János Csongor Kerekes (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Sara Brautigam, a 21-year-old from England, suffers from a debilitating syndrome known as Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS).

According to Wikipedia, “People with POTS have problems maintaining homeostasis when changing position, e.g. moving from one chair to another or reaching above their heads. Many also experience symptoms when stationary or even while lying down.”

For Brautigam, however, the issue is even more serious: rapid palpitations cause her heart to stop completely. At this point, “her blood pressure to plummet[s] to what doctors record as clinically dead.”

In 2012, for instance, Brautigam died and was brought back to life 36 times. When she loses consciousness, paramedics do their best to inflict pain to shock Brautigam’s heart into beating.

Brautigam told BT.com:

“When it happens paramedics try and do anything to inflict pain to try and shock me into coming back to life.

“A lot of the time I’ll wake up with big bruises.

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Network theory sheds new light on origins of consciousness

The black dots correspond to the 264 areas of the cerebral cortex that the researchers probed, and the lines correspond to the increased strength of the functional connections between each of these brain areas when subjects consciously perceive the target. The "hotter" colors are associated with stronger connections. This figure illustrates that awareness of the target corresponds to widespread increase in the strength of functional connections (Credit: Marois / Godwin).

The black dots correspond to the 264 areas of the cerebral cortex that the researchers probed, and the lines correspond to the increased strength of the functional connections between each of these brain areas when subjects consciously perceive the target. The “hotter” colors are associated with stronger connections. This figure illustrates that awareness of the target corresponds to widespread increase in the strength of functional connections (Credit: Marois / Godwin).

Melanie Moran Via Medical Express:

Where in your brain do you exist? Is your awareness of the world around you and of yourself as an individual the result of specific, focused changes in your brain, or does that awareness come from a broad network of neural activity? How does your brain produce awareness?

Vanderbilt University researchers took a significant step toward answering these longstanding questions with a recent imaging study, in which they discovered global changes in how brain areas communicate with one another during awareness.

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Non-invasive Alzheimer’s treatment restores memory using ultrasound

Allan Ajifo (CC BY 2.0)

Allan Ajifo (CC BY 2.0)

Colin Jeffrey at Gizmag writes:

Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that most often begins in people over 65 years of age. Usually it starts slowly and continues to worsen over time until the sufferer succumbs to an increasing loss of memory, bodily functions and, eventually, death. Research has shown that there is an association with Alzheimer’s and the accumulation of plaques that affect the neuronal connections in the brain. Now researchers at the University of Queensland have discovered a new way to remove these toxic plaques using a non-invasive form of ultrasound therapy.

Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide – composed of some 36 to 43 amino acids – has been the plaque associated with the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease for some time now. As such, some research into removing this toxic substance from human brains has been conducted, but almost invariably requires invasive pharmaceutical intervention which is far from completely effective.

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California Firefighter Says Antibiotic “Cipro” Poisoned His Body, His Life

Skeletal formula of ciprofloxacin.

Skeletal formula of ciprofloxacin.

Via CBS Los Angeles:

A Southland firefighter wants to warn others about a prescription drug that he says poisoned him and stripped him of the ability to do what he loves.

Chino resident Chris Jones was taking a powerful antibiotic called ciprofloxacin, more commonly known by the brand name “Cipro.” It’s taken by millions of Americans every year.

Cipro belongs to a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones, which are so strong they can kill anthrax. They’re used to kill a wide variety of bacteria responsible for many common infections.

Jones’ ordeal started in October with a bout of groin pain, which he thought was a hernia.

His doctor suspected it was an infection and prescribed him Cipro, but Jones took the generic.

Two days after starting the medication, Jones called his doctor about soreness he was feeling in his legs. The doctor said to keep taking the medication.

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How human composting will change death in the city

joiseyshowaa (CC BY-SA 2.0)

joiseyshowaa (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Katie Herzog via Grist:

What we do with our dead can seem bizarre to outsiders. In a Tibetan tradition called sky burial, the deceased are cut into small pieces by a man known as therogyapa, or “breaker of bodies,” and laid atop mountains to be picked apart by vultures. Later, the bones are collected and pulverized with flour and yak butter and fed to crows and hawks. Feeding your loved ones to the same birds who eat roadkill may seem morbid to those of us in the West, but in Tibet, it’s both sacrosanct (these birds are sacred in Buddhism) and practical (ever tried to dig a grave in frozen ground?).

Tibet isn’t the only place with seemingly odd customs: In Madagascar, the bodies of the deceased are exhumed and sprayed with wine and perfume every few years. In Ghana, people are buried in coffins that represent their lives, so a fisherman might spend eternity in a box shaped like a carp and a farmer may spend it in a six-foot cob of corn.

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Ending Aging with Dr. Aubrey de Grey | Midwest Real

aubrey de grey

Via Midwest Real

Dr. Aubrey de Grey is Co-Founder and Chief Science Officer at the SENS Research Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to ending aging. 

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The march of time spares none, neither rich, famous nor powerful. The deep, existential angst that comes part and parcel with that knowledge has, no doubt, haunted mankind from the very first moment we became self-aware. It’s also the one obstacle we’ve encountered as a species we just take for granted as the unassailable natural order of things.

It’s incredible really- we’ve walked the moon, we fly across the world and we transmit words through the air as if it’s trivial. Yet, for some reason when it comes to aging, we yield. Even the most brilliant men among us don’t consider the possibility that we might be able to circumvent becoming old and dying.

Actually, some brilliant men do.

Ending aging has become the life’s work of our guest, Dr.Read the rest

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Mushroom Medicine: 5 Fungi Capable Of Profound Healing

Luke Sumpter via reset.me:

Fungi are a fascinating life form. They belong neither to the plant nor animal kingdoms, and they actually share more DNA with animals that they do with plants. Adding to their strangeness, the largest organism ever discovered on the planet is a network of mushroom mycelium that weaves across a colossal 2,200 acres underneath Oregon’s ancient Malheur National Forest.

Another standout quality of fungi is that some species are among the most potent natural medicines available. They offer an amazing spectrum of health benefits, from anti-tumor and anti-oxidant qualities, to depression and anxiety relief.

Here is a list describing five of the most potent mushroom medicines known to date:

1. Reishi (Ganoderma Lucidum)

"Ganoderma lucidum 01" by Eric Steinert - photo taken by Eric Steinert at Paussac, France. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Ganoderma lucidum 01” by Eric Steinert – photo taken by Eric Steinert at Paussac, France. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

The reishi mushroom has been used by physicians for thousands of years in China, where it was deemed to be so effective at preventing illness and curing disease that it earned the prestigious title, ‘Mushroom of Immortality.’ It was once reserved exclusively for the healing benefit of the upper echelons of society, as described in aHuffington Post article

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99 Percent Certainty Hormone-Altering Chemicals Cause Serious Health Problems

Avoiding the chemically treated foods produced by agribusiness may be well worth the Whole Paycheck premium, per this report from National Geographic, although the problems are not restricted to foods, spanning all sorts of plastics, flame retardants and even paper receipts:

Exposure to hormone-disrupting chemicals is likely leading to an increased risk of serious health problems costing at least $175 billion (U.S.) per year in Europe alone, according to a study published Thursday.

Crop spraying - geograph.org.uk - 274618

Chemicals that can mimic or block estrogen or other hormones are commonly found in thousands of products around the world, including plastics, pesticides, furniture, and cosmetics.

The new research estimated health care costs in Europe, where policymakers are debating whether to enact the world’s first regulations targeting endocrine disruptors. The European Union’s controversial strategy, if approved, would have a profound effect on industries and consumer products worldwide.

Linda Birnbaum, the leading environmental health official in the U.S.

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Wind Energy Was Largest Source Of New US Electricity In 2014

Joshua S. Hill Via CleanTechnica:

The American Wind Energy Association has commented on the US Department of Energy’s data released for 2014 this week, which showed that wind energy added “significantly more” electricity than any other resource across the year.

According to Department of Energy (DoE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) statistics, wind energy generated 4.4% of all electricity during 2014, maintaining its position as the country’s fifth largest electricity source.

Wind energy generated a total of 181,791 GWh of electricity in 2014, up 13,951 GWh over 2013 levels.

EIA-1

 

Continue reading. (And please mark this article as “interesting” over at CleanTechnica if you found it informative.)

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Daily diary reveals how cannabis use affects people with bipolar

Experiences in real-time. Rafael-castillo, CC BY

Experiences in real-time. Rafael-castillo, CC BY

By Elizabeth Tyler, Lancaster University

Rates of substance use are higher in people with mental health problems compared to the general population and particularly in people with bipolar disorder, with cannabis the street drug most frequently used. Estimates suggest that up to 64% of this group have tried cannabis at least once in their lives, against about 30% of those without the disorder, despite only being about 2% of the overall population.

Specific reasons for the high levels of cannabis use in bipolar disorder are not yet fully understood. Retrospective studies (using case histories and qualitative interviews) suggest that individuals see cannabis as sometimes useful for managing symptoms of mania and depression. However, a number of large scale research studies have found that cannabis use is associated with significantly more manic and depressive episodes.

The daily experience

A study we published in PLOS ONE is the first to explore the use of cannabis in bipolar disorder in daily life.… Read the rest

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