Tag Archives | Health

Mastering the Mind and Body Through Meditation, Jiu-Jitsu and Ayahuasca with Nicolas Gregoriades| the midwest real podcast

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Nic Gregoriades is a world-traveling, ayahuasca-drinking, elite Jiu-Jitsu black belt. He’s founder of the Jiu-Jitsu Brotherhood and co-host of The Journey Podcast.

Via Midwest Real

“Life is not a problem to be solved, it is a mystery to be lived” – Osho 

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What a mind-blasting reminder that is, “life is not a problem.” So many of our personal shortcomings, issues and anxieties stem from just such a mindset- living life as if it’s a series of problems to be solved. Over the centuries, we’ve questioned and tinkered with what life is and what it “means” so much that we’ve condemned ourselves to a poisonous abyss of paradigms, expectations and momentum.

Overcoming that conditioning isn’t about running off into the woods and becoming a Luddite. We can’t just climb out of the proverbial pandora’s box of knowledge, stimulation, passion and competition we’re immersed in. But, there’s a beautifully simple escape sitting right behind the eyeballs you’re using to stare at this screen.… Read the rest

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Hidden Hazards Found in ‘Green’ Products

Valerie Everett (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Valerie Everett (CC BY-SA 2.0)

via The University of Melbourne:

A University of Melbourne researcher has found that common consumer products, including those marketed as ‘green’, ‘all-natural’, ‘non-toxic’, and ‘organic’, emit a range of compounds that could harm human health and air quality. But most of these ingredients are not disclosed to the public.

Dr. Anne Steinemann, Professor of Civil Engineering, and the Chair of Sustainable Cities, from the Department of Infrastructure Engineering, Melbourne School of Engineering, is a world expert on environmental pollutants, air quality, and health effects.

Professor Steinemann investigated and compared volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 37 different products, such as air fresheners, cleaning products, laundry supplies, and personal care products, including those with certifications and claims of ‘green’ and ‘organic’. Both fragranced and fragrance-free products were tested.

The study, published in the journal Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health found 156 different VOCs emitted from the 37 products, with an average of 15 VOCs per product.

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Racism Linked to Infant Mortality and Learning Disabilities

Janell Ross writes at the Root:

A pair of Emory University studies released this year have connected the large share of African-American children born before term with the biologically detectable effects of stress created in women’s bodies after decades of dealing with American racism. As shocking as that itself may sound, the studies’ findings don’t end there.

Racism, and its ability to increase the odds that a pregnant mother will deliver her child early, can kill. There is also evidence that racism can alter the capacity for a child to learn and distorts lives in ways that can reproduce inequality, poverty and long-term disadvantage, the studies found.

“Racism is an incredibly powerful force,” said Elizabeth Corwin, dean of research at Emory University’s Woodruff School of Nursing,

In 2012, a stunning 11.5 percent of American children were born preterm, the medical community’s shorthand for a child who spends 38 weeks or less in their mother’s womb.

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Coca-Cola Pays Nutrition Experts to Recommend Coke as a Healthy Snack

Beverley Goodwin (CC BY 2.0)

Beverley Goodwin (CC BY 2.0)

In light of dwindling Coke sales in the US, Coca-Cola has begun partnering with fitness and nutrition “experts” to recommend Coke as a healthy snack.

Ethics…

The AP via Mashable:

If a column in honor of heart health suggests a can of Coke as a snack, you might want to read the fine print.

The world’s biggest beverage maker, which struggles with declining soda consumption in the U.S., is working with fitness and nutrition experts who suggest its cola as a healthy treat. In February, for instance, several wrote online pieces for American Heart Month, with each including a mini-can of Coke or small soda as a snack idea.

The mentions — which appeared on nutrition blogs and other sites including those of major newspapers — show the many ways food companies work behind the scenes to cast their products in a positive light, often with the help of third parties who are seen as trusted authorities.

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How to Teach Doctors Empathy

Eva Blue (CC BY 2.0)

Eva Blue (CC BY 2.0)

Sandra G. Boodman writes at The Atlantic:

The patient was dying and she knew it. In her mid-50s, she had been battling breast cancer for years, but it had spread to her bones, causing unrelenting pain that required hospitalization. Jeremy Force, a first-year oncology fellow at Duke University Medical Center who had never met the woman, was assigned to stop by her room last November to discuss her decision to enter hospice.

Employing the skills he had just learned in a day-long course, Force sat at the end of her bed and listened intently. The woman wept, telling him she was exhausted and worried about the impact her death would have on her two daughters.

“I acknowledged how hard what she was going through was,” Force said of their 15-minute conversation, “and told her I had two children, too,” and that hospice was designed to provide her additional support.

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The Failure of Modern Industrial Agriculture

Matthias Ripp (CC By 2.0)

Matthias Ripp (CC By 2.0)

John Ikerd writes at Dollars & Sense:

Americans are being subjected to an ongoing multimillion-dollar propaganda campaign designed to “increase confidence and trust in today’s agriculture.” Food Dialogues, just one example of this broader trend, is a campaign sponsored by the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance—an industry organization whose funders and board members include Monsanto, DuPont, and John Deere. The campaign features the “faces of farming and ranching”—articulate, attractive young farmers, obviously chosen to put the best possible face on the increasingly ugly business of industrial agriculture, which dominates our food- production system.

Genetically engineered crops, inhumane treatment of farm animals, and routine feeding of antibiotics to confined animals—among many other problems—have eroded public trust in American agriculture. In response, the defenders of so-called modern agriculture have employed top public relations firms to try to clean up their tarnished public image. Their campaigns emphasize such issues as water quality, food safety, animal welfare, and “food prices and choices.”

Mounting public concerns in each of these areas are supported by a growing body of scientific evidence.

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10 Medicinal Weeds That May Grow In Your Backyard

"Milk thistle flowerhead" by Taken byfir0002 | flagstaffotos.com.auCanon 20D + Sigma 150mm f/2.8 - Own work. Licensed under GFDL 1.2 via Wikimedia Commons.

Milk thistle flowerhead” by Taken byfir0002 | flagstaffotos.com.au Canon 20D + Sigma 150mm f/2.8 – Own work. Licensed under GFDL 1.2 via Wikimedia Commons.

Jeff Roberts writes at Collective-Evolution:

For thousands of years, man has looked to nature to cure disease. In the last decade particularly, medicinal plants have been catapulted into mainstream culture, with the  popularity of plant medicines such as ayahuasca, ibogaine and cannabis making headlines for their powerful healing abilities against some of today’s most prominent illnesses.  However, these plant medicines come with illicit conditions in most countries.

The good news is, some of the most common weeds in our backyard yield amazing healing abilities, and they are all legal! Here are ten weeds which possess interesting medicinal properties. (Note: Consult with your health professional before self-medicating with these plants)

Chicory (Cichorium intybus), the light blue flower frequently seen along roads, provides the main commercial source of the compound inulin.

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South African Doctors Perform First Successful Penis Transplant

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The team at Stellenbosch University. 

A medical team in South Africa has successfully performed a penis transplant. And, yes, it is fully function.

The patient, a 21-year-old whose name is being withheld for ethical reasons, underwent the procedure on December 11, 2014. Three months later, his new member is now completely functional.

“Our goal was that he would be fully functional at two years and we are very surprised by his rapid recovery,” says Prof André van der Merwe, head of Stellenbosch University’s Division of Urology.

This is a very important breakthrough for the medical community around the world, but especially so in South Africa. In SA, many young men lose their penises from botched circumcisions. The 21-year-old patient’s penis had to be amputated three years ago when he developed severe complications. It is estimated that there as many as 250 amputations a year in South Africa. Understandably, this can cause psychological damage to the amputees.… Read the rest

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Yes, sexism is rife in surgery – and it’s time to do something about it

Aleera (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Fewer than one in three surgical trainees are women and the numbers fall as doctors reach advanced training.
Aleera (CC BY-ND 2.0)

By Elizabeth Sturgiss, Australian National University and Christine Phillips, Australian National University

You would expect women to flourish in medicine. Since 1996, women have outnumbered men in Australian medical schools. More than half of general practice trainees, two out of three paediatric trainees, and close to three in four obstetricians in training are women.

Look at surgical training and this pattern stops: fewer than one in three surgical trainees are women, and the numbers fall further as doctors reach advanced training. Just 9% of surgeons in Australia are women.

Late last week, vascular surgeon Dr Gabrielle McMullin unleashed a storm by suggesting that sexual harassment was common in surgical training. She said gaining redress was so compromised that if a female doctor was propositioned, providing a sexual favour may be the only way to sustain her career.… Read the rest

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What It’s Like to Die 36 Times in One Year

János Csongor Kerekes (CC BY-ND 2.0)

János Csongor Kerekes (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Sara Brautigam, a 21-year-old from England, suffers from a debilitating syndrome known as Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS).

According to Wikipedia, “People with POTS have problems maintaining homeostasis when changing position, e.g. moving from one chair to another or reaching above their heads. Many also experience symptoms when stationary or even while lying down.”

For Brautigam, however, the issue is even more serious: rapid palpitations cause her heart to stop completely. At this point, “her blood pressure to plummet[s] to what doctors record as clinically dead.”

In 2012, for instance, Brautigam died and was brought back to life 36 times. When she loses consciousness, paramedics do their best to inflict pain to shock Brautigam’s heart into beating.

Brautigam told BT.com:

“When it happens paramedics try and do anything to inflict pain to try and shock me into coming back to life.

“A lot of the time I’ll wake up with big bruises.

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