Tag Archives | Health

The Nature of Mind and the Holographic Brain

Ardonik (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Ardonik (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Via War is a Crime

The purpose of this article is to provide evidence that strongly indicates that you are not your brain, or your body for that matter, and that the nature of mind, of memory, and of our brains may actually be vastly different than we have been lead to believe.

Since time immemorial, man has been fascinated by the mind, leading great thinkers from Hippocrates to Descartes to ponder the nature of mind with wonder. Fast forward to modern times and observe how the mind is still revered and is dominating our culture. We have a lot of firm beliefs about the nature of mind, and I believe the ego — our limited perception of ourselves — and thus human ignorance, is intricately tied in with these beliefs.

But the truth of the matter is that we only understand a fraction of the mind’s potential, i.e.

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Muscle Strength Is in the Mind

istolethetv (CC BY 2.0)

istolethetv (CC BY 2.0)

via The Atlantic:

“If there are jocks on one side, and it’s a confrontation, the other side, by definition, has to be nerds,” David Anderegg wrote of what he calls the “archetypal struggle” in Nerds: Who They Are and Why We Need More of Them.

Of course, there are moments—mostly in Disney musicals—when both camps lay down their footballs and their calculators and realize that really, brain and brawn aren’t mutually exclusive—that, in fact, they have more in common than they ever thought.

This is one of those moments.

In a small study recently published in the Journal of Neurophysiology, researchers found that much of muscle strength is based on brain activity, rather than on the mass of the muscles themselves. Researchers at Ohio University’s Musculoskeletal and Neurological Institute, 29 volunteers had their non-dominant arms placed in elbow-to-finger casts for four weeks. (Fifteen others acted as a cast-free control group.) Of the 29, 14 were asked to perform mental-imagery exercises five days a week, imagining themselves alternately flexing and resting their immobilized wrists for five-second intervals.

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Men Can Live 20 Years Longer… But There’s A High Cost

JD Hancock (CC BY 2.0)

JD Hancock (CC BY 2.0)

If there was 100%, without a doubt proof that this worked. Would you do it?

Via io9

Men, what would you be willing to give up to live a couple decades longer? Think carefully before you answer. Research has shown that men who are castrated may have significantly longer lifespans. Here’s what we know.

Behavior or Biology?

You’ve probably heard about the gender gap in human life expectancy. According to the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, females worldwide live an average of 73.5 years, while males average 68.5. Those figures can vary pretty drastically (life expectancy for both men and women is still less than 55 years throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa), but the last several decades have seen large gains in life expectancy across the globe, for men and women, alike. Still, the gender gap persists*. “Wherever they live in the world,” reported the World Health Organization in 2014, “women live longer than men.”

Why the disparity?

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U.S. Lifts Ban on Irish Beef 15 Years After Mad Cow

Michael Johnson (CC BY 2.0)

Michael Johnson (CC BY 2.0)

According to the CDC:

“The incubation period for vCJD is unknown because it is a new disease. However, it is likely that ultimately this incubation period will be measured in terms of many years or decades. In other words, whenever a person develops vCJD from consuming a BSE-contaminated product, he or she likely would have consumed that product many years or a decade or more earlier.”

Various considerations put the incubation period somewhere between 15 to  60+ years.

Chaos_Dynamics

The US has decided to lift its ban on Irish beef 15 years later. More at Bloomberg:

The U.S., the world’s biggest beef consumer, is lifting a ban on imports from Ireland more than 15 years after mad cow disease spurred restrictions of supplies from Europe.

Ireland’s Agriculture Ministry said it’s the first European Union country to regain access to the U.S. market, which buys more beef than any other country, according to an online statement today.

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The evolution of ecstasy: From Mandy to Superman, the effects of the drug MDMA

Ecstasy_monogram

Via The Independent

Ecstasy is a nickname for the psychoactive drug MDMA.  The drug has been popular among dance music enthusiasts for decades, but the drug has begun to change in recent years, and these changes have led to many adverse outcomes, including death.

In the last few weeks, four people in the UK died after reportedlytaking pills from a “bad” batch of ecstasy – and officers suspect all are linked with a batch of “Superman” pills from Ipswich. Over the last couple of years, throughout both Europe and the US, many users have been hospitalized or have died after taking ecstasy. So many poisonings have begun to occur largely because adulterants—primarily new psychoactive drugs—are now commonly added to ecstasy.

The history

Ecstasy has been one of the most popular party drugs since the 1980s. Despite being illegal, use has been widely available and closely associated with the dance music scene.

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Fecal Farms: Drone Video Exposes ‘Feces Lake’ Inside Mega US Factory Farm

factory-farm-drone-lake

via The Mind Unleashed:

You’ve seen disturbing images and videos of factory farm animals being forced to live in the absolute worst of conditions, but a new overhead video captured by a spy drone reveals a whole new sector of disturbing factory farm activity.

Caught on tape and unveiled in the video and images below, drone operator Mark Devries says that the apparent ‘lake’ residing on the factory farm compound is in fact a large holding body of feces, urine, and who knows what else.

Read more.

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The Future Is Local, The Future Is Not Monsanto

via RINF:

The US as a nation consumes more than anyone else, virtually at the expense of everyone else. The petrodollar system has ensured that imports into the US have been cheap and readily available. Post 1945, Washington has been able to take full advantage of the labour and the material resources of poor countries.

Consider that ‘developing’ nations account for more than 80 percent of world population but consume only about a third of the world’s energy. Also bear in mind that US citizens constitute 5 percent of the world’s population but consume 24 percent of the world’s energy. On average, one American consumes as much energy as two Japanese, six Mexicans, 13 Chinese, 31 Indians, 128 Bangladeshis, 307 Tanzanians and 370 Ethiopians [1].

The US is able to consume the way it does because of high demand for the US dollar: it is the world reserve currency.

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Kentucky wants drugmaker to pay for OxyContin abuse

Häggström, Mikael. "Medical gallery of Mikael Häggström 2014". Wikiversity Journal of Medicine 1 (2). DOI:10.15347/wjm/2014.008. ISSN 20018762.

Häggström, Mikael. “Medical gallery of Mikael Häggström 2014“. Wikiversity Journal of Medicine 1 (2). DOI:10.15347/wjm/2014.008. ISSN 20018762.

via Courier Journal:

A common refrain in Kentucky’s hardscrabble hills is that an entire generation has been lost to pain-pill abuse. Addiction has spawned crime, filled county jails and overburdened the too-few treatment centers. Overdoses have torn children from parents and parents from children.

State officials trace the roots of the problem to one potent drug: OxyContin. And for seven years, they’ve been forging ahead with a civil lawsuit that seeks to make drugmaker Purdue Pharma pay. As early as next year, it could bring the first-ever jury trial pitting Purdue against an addiction-plagued state over the painkiller.

“This is about holding them accountable,” Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway said. “They played a pre-eminent role in the state’s drug problem. This started to explode in the mid-1990s when Purdue Pharma was marketing OxyContin.

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This Weird Side Effect Nearly Torpedoed The Practice Of Anesthesia

Otis Historical Archives National Museum of Health and Medicine (CC BY 2.0)

Otis Historical Archives National Museum of Health and Medicine (CC BY 2.0)

via io9:

It’s 1844, and surgeries are brutal, agonizing, and necessary slapdash. One man promises he can make it so patients feel no pain. He proves it with a patient who screams hysterically throughout a short procedure. Here’s how a side effect of laughing gas nearly strangled anesthesiology in its cradle.

The Fiasco of 1844

Medical students at Harvard fought to cram themselves into an operating theater for an unprecedented procedure. A dentist had been making the rounds, claiming that he had a gas, nitrous oxide, that could stop a patient from feeling pain during a procedure. At that time, all surgery rooms came equipped with a table, some good strong lights, and a group of even stronger men who would hold the writhing patient down while the surgeons cut flesh and sawed through bone. Successful surgeons were fast surgeons.

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