Tag Archives | Heroin

King Buzzo Calls Bullshit on Kurt Cobain’s “Chronic Stomach Condition”

kingbuzzoTruth: I live in Seattle, was a freshman in high school right when Nirvana broke, and never thought they were anything more than a pretty good band lead by a complete fuckup with perfect cheek bones and piercing blue eyes. Don’t get me wrong, I like a few of their albums (In Utero specifically), but you know, I just always thought Soundgarden was a gajillion times better, even as an angry disaffected teenager. 20 years later, of all the platinum selling “grunge” bands, SG are the only ones I actually listen to on a regular basis. Will I ever watch this Montage of Heck movie? Probably, but I also just watched the Foreigner Behind the Music, so you know, that’s my way of saying that I’d pretty much watch any rock music docu-anything because there’s something incredibly wrong with me. Anyway, the reason I’m posting this is because as a kid I always thought Kurt’s story about being a drug addict because of his “chronic stomach condition” was a bunch of utter shite, so after all these years it’s compelling to see that, according to King Buzzo of the legendary Melvins, it absolutely was (from Stereogum):

Kurt also told me there was absolutely nothing wrong with his stomach.

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How A Single Yeast Cell Can Cook Up Morphine From Scratch

The economics of home brewed heroin must have drug lords quaking in their boots. This is worse than Walter White! The New Yorker looks at how a single yeast cell can cook up morphine from scratch:

For as long as humans have been farmers, we have been drinkers. Wild yeast was the first microorganism that we domesticated, more than ten millennia ago. But archaeologists believe that we have been harvesting the gum of opium poppies for even longer. Across a broad swath of the Middle East and Asia, our ancestors tapped, dried, boiled, and consumed the poppy pod’s sticky secretions. The flower provided one of the first medicinal substances known to humanity, as well as a potent high. But not even the Romantic poets, ensconced in their stately pleasure-domes and out of their minds on smack, could have imagined what a paper published today in the journal Nature Chemical Biology describes: turning yeast, a simple fungus, into a narcotics lab to rival the poppy.

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Heroin Deaths in US ‘Quadrupled from 2000 through 2013′

The CDC reports that deaths from heroin have quadrupled since 2000 and it’s way worse for males: the rate for men increased from 1.6 to 4.2 per 100,000 while the rate for women increased from 0.4 to 1.2 per 100,000. From MNT:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have reported that drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin almost quadrupled between 2000 and 2013 in the US.

Heroin aufkochen.JPG

Photo: Hendrike (CC)

 

The findings from the National Center for Heath Statistics (NCHS) report state that the age-adjusted rate of deaths involving heroin increased from 0.7 deaths per 100,000 to 2.7 per 100,000 during this period, with the majority of this rise occurring after 2010.

“This report provides the latest national statistics on drug overdose deaths involving heroin, highlighting the substantial increase in death rates and the populations most at risk,” the authors state.

Drug poisoning (overdosing) is the number one cause of injury-related death in the US.

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The 3 deadliest drugs in America are all totally legal

via Vox Media.

via Vox.

German Lopez via Vox:

As the US debates drug policy reforms and marijuana legalization, there’s one aspect of the war on drugs that remains perplexingly contradictory: some of the most dangerous drugs in the US are legal.

Don’t believe it? The available data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows tobacco, alcohol, and opioid-based prescription painkillers were responsible for more direct deaths than any other drug in 2011. This chart compares those drug deaths with the best available data for cocaine, heroin, and marijuana deaths [show above].

Now, this chart isn’t a perfect comparison across the board. One driver of tobacco and alcohol deaths is that both substances are legal and easily available. Other substances would likely be far deadlier if they were as available as tobacco and alcohol. (Heroin-linked deaths in particular have been trending up since 2010, topping 8,200 in 2013 and making heroin deadlier overall than cocaine.) And federal data excludes some deaths, particularly less direct illicit drug deaths, which is why the chart focuses on direct health complications for all drugs.

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Dolls on Film

Dolls

This New York Dolls documentary was just uncovered by Noisey and it’s required viewing for anyone interested in punk’s early greatest days. From the site…

Directed by Nadya Beck and Bob Gruen, All Dolled Up: A New York Dolls Story is a feature-length documentary that was filmed in 1972, and sees the then-married pair follow the band from their early performances in New York at Kenny’s Castaways and Max’s Kansas City to their infamous West Coast tour. Expect to see raucous, debaucherous backstage antics, illuminating interviews, footage from the Whisky A Go Go, the Real Don Steele Show, Rodney Bingenheimer’s E Club, and much more. The documentary features the entire original lineup—David Johansen (vocals), Johnny Thunders (guitar), Sylvain Sylvain (guitar), Arthur Kane (bass), and Billy Murcia (drums)—and captures an image of the band before death, alcohol, and heroin tore it asunder. It’s an intimate look at rock’n’roll’s greatest underdogs that took in too much, too soon, but still always came out swinging.

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Watching Friends Recover From Addiction on Facebook

By Mr. Theklan via Flickr (CC by-sa 2.0)

By Mr. Theklan via Flickr (CC by-sa 2.0)

via The Atlantic:

Through likes and comments, I’ve watched my hometown of Perry, Ohio, disappear into and come back from heroin addiction.

The U.S. is facing a massive heroin epidemic, and nowhere is it more evident than in Ohio, where fatal drug overdoses surpassed car crashes as the leading cause of accidental death in 2007, and increased by 60 percent from 2011 to 2012. Addicts in rehabilitation say heroin is the easiest drug to find. State legislators have called for Republican Governor John Kasich to declare the prevalence of heroin a public-health emergency, and in May he agreed to an Obamacare Medicaid expansion largely because the state badly needed the federal help in funding treatment for heroin addiction.

Perry, Ohio, is a microcosm of the epidemic, which is now infiltrating upper-middle-class suburbs. Thirty minutes east of Cleveland, the town of 1,500 has a median annual income $31,000 higher than that of Ohio overall, but it also lacks opportunities for young adults to start their lives.

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Kratom can reduce opiate addiction, get you high, and is legal in the US.

Mitragyna speciosa leaves by Uomo vitruviano via Wikimedia Commons.

Mitragyna speciosa leaves by Uomo vitruviano via Wikimedia Commons.

Have you tried Kratom?

via AlterNet:

Why are people across the U.S. chewing on the small, glossy leaves of the Southeast Asian Kratom tree? It’s an ancient plant medicine related to coffee, and it produces a high that’s both euphoric and legal. Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) has long been used in Thailand and Malaysia to relieve pain, settle the stomach and reduce opiate dependence. Now it’s taking off in the West.

According to SageWisdom.org, Kratom leaves can be chewed fresh or dry, powdered, or brewed into a tea. It is not usually smoked, because the “amount of leaf that constitutes a typical dose is too much to be smoked easily.” It’s most commonly sold in powder form in packets, both online and in kava bars—alcohol-free bars where people can consume tea made from the legal, Polynesian kava root— and head shops.

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Legal highs need regulation, not an outright ban

Bans don’t work. matthijs, CC BY-NC-ND

Bans don’t work. matthijs, CC BY-NC-ND

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
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By Matthew Warren, University of Oxford

A few doors down from my house, a man is selling drugs. He has herbs to smoke that could leave me happy and stoned and various white powders to ingest that could keep me partying all night. All this would be totally legal, because he runs my local head shop.

Such easy access means people succumb to buying these drugs. One in five freshers who are starting universities this month have admitted to trying one of these legal highs.

Like many countries, the UK is currently working out how to deal with legal highs, or, to use the proper nomenclature, New Psychoactive Substances (NPS). Over the past decade, the use of NPS has become increasingly common as more and more products and head shops enter the market.… Read the rest

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Men Charged With Distributing”Breaking Bad”-Branded Heroin

breakingbadHeroin? Really? Is it at least blue? Heisenberg would be very disappointed until the second he melted them both down with carbolic acid.

Two New York men were charged today with distributing “Breaking Bad”-branded heroin that was so potent it caused the overdose death of three users, according to federal officials.

Dennis Sica, 36, and John Rohlman, 25, are named in a criminal complaint charging them with conspiracy to distribute heroin, which carries a mandatory minimum of 20 years in prison due to the deaths resulting from the drug’s sale.

The “Breaking Bad” heroin is seen in the above Drug Enforcement Administration evidence photo. The glassine envelopes are stamped with the logo from the popular cable TV drama about a high school chemistry teacher who turns into a methamphetamine trafficker.

According to prosecutors, the “Breaking Bad” heroin was “laced with fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is significantly stronger than street heroin.” Sica and Rohlman have been accused of distributing the heroin between late-2013 and February 2014, when Sica was arrested for drug possession following a vehicle stop.

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