Tag Archives | hip-hop

Psychoactive Soundscapes: The Trippiest Albums of 2014

darksideofthesun2The idea that the multiverse is more akin to an art project than a science experiment (or an art experiment if you’re so inclined) is one of those Occult themes that typically gets dismissed by both overly scientific and religious types alike. Even though it quite inarguably resonates now more than ever. One of the stranger aspects of human psychology that we essentially avoid touching in typical academic or spiritual discourse involves the fact that your average person now consumes roughly a hundred thousand times more art in a given year than they did even a mere century ago. We used to rely on mediums like galleries, plays, symphonies, and libraries to dispense our art, most of which weren’t super accessible to people who weren’t wealthy or close to an urban center. Now the fact that the Internet and cable television beam recreational distractions into our homes 24/7 seems almost like a trivial afterthought.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

“Fuck tha Police” in Historical Context

via Medium:

With a few notable exceptions, rappers have been conspicuously absent in the response to the grand jury decisions in Ferguson and Staten Island. The Internets want to know why.

Back in 1970, CSNY’s protest anthem “Ohio” was on the radio within a few weeks of the massacre at Kent State—and that was in 1970. Those records had to be pressed up on vinyl and delivered to radio stations by actual human beings.

Theoretically, a rapper could have issued a response to #Ferguson, say, the same afternoon Darren Wilson shot Mike Brown dead in the street, or the same evening a grand jury decided he shouldn’t be charged with a crime. We have the technology.

Chuck D, who once called hip-hop the black CNN, in what’s since become one of the most shopworn cliches in the history of hip-hop journalism, often touted the Internets’ potential in this regard.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Killer Mike’s Pre-Show Speech After Ferguson Verdict.

Much respect to Killer Mike for having the heart required to be a true emcee. Same goes for El-P. Much respect to Run the Jewels and real fucking hip hop artists the world over.

Via MaruiceGarland.com

Fate would have it that Run The Jewels had a show in St. Louis the same night that the non-indictment of Murderer Darren Wilson went down in neighboring Ferguson, Missouri. Run The Jewels usually open the show by jumping right into their blood-curdling theme song. But on this night Mike took an opportunity to address the crowd first.

Her Infinite Power Helping Oppressed People is the true meaning and purpose of H.I.P.H.O.P

Undivided,unconquerable.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

The Working Class is Underrepresented in Rap – An Interview with Killer Mike

It was while listening to the horrifically embarrassing clipping. album Sub Pop put out a few months back that I suddenly realized exactly why I fail to connect with the vast majority of hip hop artists I check out (not that I CAN connect with the rich kid hipster lifestyle rock and house beat pop bullshit the corplantations push these days). So many MC’s are far too bamboozled by the hustle of the street that they fail to see the cycles of daemonic exploitation keeping themselves and their community down systematically. Really just a comment on our failed educational system more than anything, which is something Killer Mike addresses in his lyrics quite specifically. For every rap mogul gangsta, there’s a white collar CEO or Wall Street spook colder and richer than they’ll ever be by a hundred fold. They’re the ones funding these bling rap records. I wonder why. You gotta read between the lines.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Immortal Technique on Conspiracy Facts, Money as God & Breaking the Two Party Dictatorship

LIKE Breaking the Set @ http://fb.me/JournalistAbbyMartin
FOLLOW Abby Martin @ http://twitter.com/AbbyMartin

Abby Martin an exclusive interview with hip hop artist Immortal Technique discussing everything from his creative process in his politically charged lyrics to his views on capitalism and the two-party stronghold over American politics.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Questlove: How Hip-Hop Failed Black America

Questlove2enhancedUber-hip man about town Questlove writes the first of “six essays looking at hip-hop’s recent past, thinking about its distant past, and wondering about the possibility of a future,” for Vulture:

There are three famous quotes that haunt me and guide me though my days. The first is from John Bradford, the 16th-century English reformer. In prison for inciting a mob, Bradford saw a parade of prisoners on their way to being executed and said, “There but for the grace of God go I.” (Actually, he said “There but for the grace of God goes John Bradford,” but the switch to the pronoun makes it work for the rest of us.) The second comes from Albert Einstein, who disparagingly referred to quantum entanglement as “spooky action at a distance.” And for the third, I go to Ice Cube, the chief lyricist of N.W.A., who delivered this manifesto in “Gangsta Gangsta” back in 1988: “Life ain’t nothing but bitches and money.”

Those three ideas may seem distant from one another, but if you set them up and draw lines between them, that’s triangulation.

Read the rest
Continue Reading