Tag Archives | hip-hop

ODB, STDs, and Government Cheese

ODBDid “the Government” kill the Ol’ Dirty Bastard?  From RockStarMartyr.net:

Ol’ Dirty Bastard’s slurring, incoherent “singin’ rappin’” rhymes hit the mic so hard, you have to wipe oozing spittle off your face after listening to his deranged tracks. He spoke the tough truth from the mean streets, delving into the dark crevices of ghetto crackhouses and bitch’s booties, coming out the other side covered in doodoo brown and flashing a steel grille grin all the while. Some believe that the big “G” government” took notice and were highly pissed about it.

Raised in the housing projects of Brooklyn, ODB broke out with the “world domination” scheme masterminded by his cousins, RZA and GZA, whose hip hop exploits are succinctly described by Dirty’s biographer, Jaime Lowe:

“The foundation of Wu-Tang is in its lore, its urban mythology, its appropriation of kung fu, chess, Buddhism, Islam, bible studies, cartoons, comics, Staten Island; anything they came across was woven into an intricate web of culture and identification and a constructed community that bordered on cult.… Read the rest

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Datamining Hip-Hop’s History

Duncan Geere reports for Wired :
An artist named Tahir Hemphill wants to datamine 30 years of hip-hop lyrics to provide a searchable index of the genre’s lexicon. The project analyzes the lyrics of over 40,000 songs for metaphors, similes, cultural references, phrases, memes and socio-political ideas. For each, it registers a date and a geographical location. Hemphill has raised more than $8,000 in funding for the project on Kickstarter, from 349 people. The idea is so that important questions can be answered, like who was the first to mention “haters,”...
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Urban Superheroes: Wu-Tang Clan

wutang4From Nick Pell at Red Star Times:

Hip-hop was an early love of mine. When I was but a wee lad not much music excited me. But the sounds of Run-DMC and (don’t laugh) The Fat Boys were groups I loved at a very early age. By the time I was an adolescent my sounds were the usual mish-mash of a kid searching for what he liked–Bad Religion, Nirvana, The Ramones. Still, I’ll never forget the first day that I heard The Wu-Tang Clan at a friend’s house after school. From the crude humor of the “Torture” skit to the soulful strains of “Can It All Be So Simple,” I was hooked. So began a love affair with nine men from New York that has endured for over half my life. The Wu-Tang Clan were, are and always will be more than just another hip-hop crew. They are nothing less than real life urban superheroes.… Read the rest

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