Hipsters




ccn66

Apologies for the lateness of this show, I (The Ken) have been ill.

This week: The Big Dog is off the chain, yeah that’s right, Ken’s hosting again. That’s really all you need to know….no?…ok, this week we discuss The latest activistprank from the Yes Men, New moons and hipsters, Hack your face!, Kim’s analogue dream tape, Stuff, The weirdness of Mandella’s interpreter, Brazilian football is Smash TV, Nintendo gayness, and Florida’s cache of medieval weapons.

PersonnelKim Monaghan, Frater Isla, and Ken Eakins





I think the evolution of the new lefty urban hunter goes something like this: 2006: Reads Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma, about the ickyness of the industrial food complex. Starts shopping at a…



PART ONE: WHAT IS A HIPSTER, AND WHY DOES EVERYONE HATE THEM? or: YOU’RE SO FAKE (AND SO AM I) My name is Tuna Ghost and I have a confession: I’m a…


Mark Greif writes an obituary of hipster culture for New York Magazine: If I speak of the degeneration of our most visible recent subculture, the hipster, it’s an awkward occasion. Someone will…


Is “Christian Hipster” an oxymoron? Not according to Brett McCracken, author of Hipster Christianity: When Church and Cool Collide, writing at CNN:

I grew up within conservative evangelical Christianity, and I’m thankful I did. But throughout my youth – and indeed, even now, at 27 – there are things about it that made me bristle. Things like televangelism, angry political picketing, boycotts, horrible Christian movies, copycat Christian music, anti-intellectualism, hyper-politicized discourse, “Left Behind” hysteria about the “end times,” and “hell houses” (don’t ask).

For many of my peers who grew up within this peculiar milieu, it was enough to sour them on Christianity entirely (lamentable, but understandable). But for many others, it simply urged them to rediscover the heart of the faith and explore Christian identity in terms that felt more pertinent to the world around them.

This impulse among younger generations of Christians has led to, among other things, a subculture which we might call “Christian hipsters.” They are Christians who seek to cultivate a strong aesthetic sensibility and intellectual rigor, things that were largely put on the back burner in the church of their youth. They are sooner found at Radiohead or Arcade Fire concerts than at Christian music shows, prefer contemporary art galleries to Thomas Kinkade showrooms, and exercise Christian “fellowship” through conversations about Sartre over fair-trade coffee or a round of craft beers…