Tag Archives | History

Holocaust Archaeology: A Harrowing Investigation into Treblinka

It’s hard to believe that Holocaust denialism is still a thing but this is the internet. And it is still a thing.


Forensic Magazine offers a profile of a forensic archaeologist searching for clues at the infamous Treblinka concentration camp:

For Caroline Sturdy Colls, a British archaeologist, what lies in that soil at Treblinka tells the story of perhaps the greatest crime of the 20th century. She tells part of that story in a new book, and an exhibit at the site, both unveiled this year.

Sturdy Colls and a colleague excavating the site at Treblinka.

Sturdy Colls and a colleague excavating the site at Treblinka.

“I view the Holocaust as a crime,” she toldForensic Magazine in an exclusive interview. “You can consider the sites [across Europe] as one big crime scene…

“There’s almost a social responsibility, to forensic archaeologists in particular who have got the skill sets in terms of investigating crimes, to apply those to the investigation of the Holocaust,” she added.

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A Short Vision (1956)

This short animated film is Peter and Joan Foldes’ second and last film together. Its bleak subject – the end of the world caused by a nuclear apocalypse – reflects a widespread preoccupation in 50s Britain which would soon lead to the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND). The film is composed mostly of still drawings, creating a terrifying effect amplified by a sombre commentary spoken in the style of the Bible. The film had a very strong impact on audiences, in particular across the Atlantic, where it was shown on primetime television to millions of American viewers and reportedly produced one of the biggest reactions since Orson Welles’ ‘War of the Worlds’ broadcast in 1938. (Christophe Dupin)

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If Women Ruled the World – Is a Matriarchal Society the Solution?

woman to woman
Steve Taylor, Ph.D, via Waking Times:

Is a matriarchal society the solution to our problems?

I’ve just returned from Crete, where I visited the ancient palace of Knossos, and the archaeological museum in Heraklion, where thousands of the artifacts and artworks of ancient Crete are displayed.

The most striking thing about the culture of ancient Crete (or Minoan culture, as it is often called) is how prominent women are. They are everywhere in Minoan artwork, on pottery, frescoes and figurines (small stone statues). They are shown as priestesses, goddesses, dancing and talking at social occasions, in beautiful dresses with their breasts on show. There is a striking fresco of a beautifully dressed woman surrounded by a group of half-naked dancing men.

It is clear that – as many archaeologists have agreed – this was a society in which women had very high status; at least as high as men.

Some archaeologists believe that the Minoans worshiped a goddess, and that women were the main religious leaders.

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When Nuclear Energy Almost Took to the Skies

"NB-36H with B-50, 1955 - DF-SC-83-09332" by USAF - U.S. Defenseimagery.mil photo no. DF-SC-83-09332. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons.

Back in the 1950s, under the threat of communist apocalypse, the US military had plans for a long-range bomber using the energy of nuclear decay heat to stay aloft for weeks at a time. The Convair X-6 was a design to use a radical, high-temperature, molten-salt-fueled-and-cooled reactor (MSR), and made nuclear-powered aviation come quite close to reality. This program, called NEPA (Nuclear Energy for the Propulsion of Aircraft), like its space-faring cousin-project NERVA, was ultimately a sink for around 7 billion US taxpayer dollars before it was cancelled by Eisenhower. But it actually resulted in the development of a radical type of reactor (MSR) that still could be used to safely generate massive amounts of electricity. More on that later.

The Convair X-6 bomber prototype, which carried a working nuclear reactor and heavy radiation shielding for the pilots (105,000 pounds of lead alone), was test flown nearly a dozen times in 1957.… Read the rest

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‘This Goes All the Way to the Queen’: The Puzzle Book that Drove England to Madness


Jess Zimmerman via Hazlitt:

There were more and more signs every time Ron Fletcher went to Rodborough Common. First, he found empty bottles of Haigh whiskey under a hawthorn bush—Haigh, like Haigha, the name of the March Hare in Lewis Carroll. Hare. There were more in the trash bin, along with bottles of Idris lemonade—when he took them away, they replenished themselves as if by magic. Of course, someone could be a heavy drinker of whiskey and lemonade, but everyone knows Idris is an ogre in Welsh mythology, and he plays a harp, and the trash bin was near a bench dedicated to one Fred Harper. It all connected. Ron found nothing in the hole in the tree with the blue ribbon—a blue ribbon just like the one on the Penny-Pockets Lady’s apron in the book—but on the bench he found a letter. It seemed to be a love letter from a man to another man, but that was only a front.

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Missing 24-year-old found alive and well 30 years after man confessed to her murder

petra 1

Well this is bizarre.

Louise Kelly via Independent:

A 24-year-old woman who went missing from her home in 1984, sparking a 31-year-long murder mystery, has been found alive and well.

Computer science student Petra Pazsitka vanished without a trace from her home in Germany three decades ago and was officially declared dead in 1989.

Her disappearance led to an extensive investigation, with nationwide appeals, searches and video reconstructions of her last known actions.

It is understood she left her student flat in Braunschweig and went to the shop and the dentist.

Friends claimed she then boarded a bus with the intention of going to visit her parents – but never arrived at their home.

A man who had previously been convicted for the rape and murder of a 14-year-old girl in the area confessed to Petra’s murder.

However, he later retracted his confession and Petra’s body was never found.

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Chocolate Nam

Sometimes, a ride just speaks for itself. Meet Chocolate Nam…

Choc Nam

It’s mid-day and I’m cruisin’ Haight-Ashbury. The sun is high and it is yet another perfect, beautiful San Francisco day. (Yawn.) The street is bustling with thrift store shoppers, retail workers and mid-western tourists congregating for snaps of themselves flashing peace signs below the famous intersecting street signage that marks this infamous corner. Post-selfie, it’s on to gawk at all the 60’s memorabilia glowing in black lights, as bongs and tie-dye emanate psychedelic from a multitude of head shops. And with leashed cats on their shoulders and unleashed pit-bulls at their sides, dirty-colorful neo-hippie runaways hawk pot vivacious to all that pass.

I drive past… and am immediately struck by the vision of an older black man at the peak of fashion, as he hobbles into the street to flag me with his black and silver-gilt cane on high.… Read the rest

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The oldest case of decapitation in the Americas

Remains of a ceremonial burial: The images show the shape of the burial pit (left) and the arrangement of the hands over the skull (right).

Remains of a ceremonial burial: The images show the shape of the burial pit (left) and the arrangement of the hands over the skull (right).

Researchers have found evidence that the practice of decapitation among Native Americans dates back way further than previously thought. In Lapa do Santo (east-central Brazil), newly found evidence of human decapitation dates back more than 9,000 years.

via Max Planck Institute:

Few Amerindian habits impressed the European colonizers more than the taking and displaying of human body parts, especially when decapitation was involved. Although disputed by some authors, it has become widely accepted that decapitation was common among Native Americans across the entire continent. The archaeological evidence confirms that the practice has deep chronological roots. In South America, the oldest decapitation occurred in the Andes and dates to ca. 3000 years before the present. Since all other South American archaeological cases occur in the Andes (e.g., Inca, Nazca, Moche, Wari, Tiwanaco) it was assumed that decapitation was an Andean phenomenon in both its origins and in its most unambiguous expression.

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Time Travel & The Multiverse – Many Worlds: Many Timelines


Marie D. Jones & Larry Flaxman – New Dawn via Waking Times:

Time travel has enchanted and intrigued us since the earliest days of fiction, when authors such as H.G. Wells, Samuel Madden, Charles Dickens and Enrique Gaspar y Rimbau stretched and challenged our imaginations with images and tales of men and women who invented amazing machines and devices that could take them back in time, or forward into the future. Because of the restrictions of light speed, and the paradoxes of going back to the past without damaging the future timeline, and a host of other obstacles and challenges, we, in fact, have remained stuck in the present.

Our scientific knowledge and technological achievement has yet to catch up to the limitless dreams of our imaginations. But perhaps just because we have yet to achieve time travel in our universe, in our particular point along the cosmic arrow of time, doesn’t mean it isn’t achievable… and maybe the key is the universe itself.

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