Tag Archives | History

NYMZA Aeros – Charles Dellschau and The Secret Airships of the 1850’s

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Charles A.A. Dellschau (1830 – 1923), untitled watercolor on paper c. 1898 – 1900 approx. 8 x 10 inches.

 

NYMZA Aeros – Charles Dellschau and The Secret Airships of the 1850’s

by Jimmy Ward & Pete Navarro
Posted on 15 May 2015 by Olav Phillips

Have you heard of Schultz’ Hydrowhir Auto, also known as the “Cripel Wagon”? If not, perhaps you have heard or read somewhere about Peter Mennis’ “Aero Goosey”? How about Schoetler’s “Aero Dora”, which was built in 1858 and was destroyed in a fire which consumed the town of Columbia, California that same year? Chances are you never heard or read about any of the above or the many other “Aeros’, or aircraft that were designed and actually built and flown
by members of the Sonora Aero Club around the middle of the last century in California.

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Emory Douglas: The Art of The Black Panthers


Emory Douglas: The Art of The Black Panthers from Dress Code on Vimeo.

Emory Douglas was the Revolutionary Artist and Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party. Through archival footage and conversations with Emory we share his story, alongside the rise and fall of the Panthers. He used his art as a weapon in the Black Panther Party’s struggle for civil rights and today Emory continues to give a voice to the voiceless. His art and what The Panthers fought for are still as relevant as ever.

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MORBID ANATOMY MUSEUM: Do The Spirits Return? From Dark Arts to Sleight of Hand

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Morbid Anatomy Museum Opens Third Exhibition Featuring Rarely Seen Artifacts

Related to Early Stage Magic and the Occult

The Morbid Anatomy Museum launches a new exhibition: Do The Spirits Return?: From Dark Arts to Sleight of Hand in Early 20th Century Stage Magic

Brooklyn, NY — On April 11, the Morbid Anatomy Museum launched its third exhibition devoted to the surprising relationships between 19th and early 20th century stage magic and the religion of Spiritualism, the pleasures of horror, the empowerment of women and the role of the devil, as exemplified by the life and work of Howard Thurston (1869-1936). The exhibition features stunning and rarely exhibited original stage props, posters, photographs, artworks, letters, books, and even the fabled “Luxor Mummy,” all drawn from the collection of Brooklyn native Rory Feldman. The show was curated by Morbid Anatomy Museum creative director Joanna Ebenstein and programmer in residence Shannon Taggart.

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A Disinformation Compendium — Doktor Johannes Faust’s Magia naturalis

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Doktor Johannes Faust’s Magia naturalis et innaturalis : oder, Dreifacher Höllenzwang, letztes Testament and Siegelkunst, nach einer kostbar ausgestattenten Handschrift in der Herzogl. Bibliothek zu Koburg vollständig und wortgetreu hrsg. in fünf Abtheilungen..

Translation:

Doctor Johannes Faust’s Magia naturalis et innaturalis: or, Triple hell compulsion Last Testament and Seal Art, after a preciously ausgestatt ducks handwriting in the Ducal. Library Coburg ed fully and faithfully. .. in five divisions

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The Art and Magic of Austin Osman Spare

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Over at Cvlt Nation, Mick has curated and written a brief but informative history of Austin Osman Spare and his work.

via Cvlt Nation:

[In 1906] Spare published his first political cartoon, a satire on the use of Chinese wage slave laborers in British South Africa, which appeared in the pages of The Morning Leader newspaper. During this same time, he was working diligently on A Book of Satyrs, which included nine satirical illustrations ridiculing the Church and politics. In 1907, Spare created his most infamous piece, ‘Portrait of the Artist.’ This black and white self-portrait was later purchased by Jimmy Page.

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NSA’s Big Defenders Cash Big NSA Checks

Kevin Dooley (CC BY 2.0)

Kevin Dooley (CC BY 2.0)

via Lee Fang at The Intercept:

The debate over the NSA’s bulk collection of phone records has reached a critical point after a federal appeals court last week ruled the practice illegal, dramatically raising the stakes for pending Congressional legislation that would fully or partially reinstate the program. An army of pundits promptly took to television screens, with many of them brushing off concerns about the surveillance.

The talking heads have been backstopping the NSA’s mass surveillance more or less continuously since it was revealed. They spoke out to support the agency when NSA contractor Edward Snowden released details of its programs in 2013, and they’ve kept up their advocacy ever since — on television news shows, newspaper op-ed pages, online and at Congressional hearings. But it’s often unclear just how financially cozy these pundits are with the surveillance state they defend, since they’re typically identified with titles that give no clues about their conflicts of interest.

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A Disinformation Compendium: Imagines Deorum – The Religion of the Ancients

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Imagines Deorum, Qui ab Antiquis Colebantur: in quibus simulacra, ritus, caerimoniae, magnaq[ue] ex parte veterum religio explicatur

Translation:

Images of the gods, who were worshipped by the ancients, in which the images, rites, ceremonies, a grand spectacle of a part of the religion of the ancients is explained.

by Cartari, Vincenzo, b. ca. 1500; Du Verdier, Antoine, 1544-1600

Published 1581

Colophon: Lugduni, Excudebat Guichardus Iullieron Typographus, mense Sextilis, ann. 1581
Portrait of the translator, Antoine Du Verdier, illustration facing p. 1
Headpieces; initials; portraits; printer’s device
Printer’s device on title page–Cf. Silvestre
NUC pre-1956
Baudrier, H.L. Bib. lyonnaise
Silvestre. Marques typographiques — Includes a compendium of the various images of the gods (p. [2-26]) and an index (p. [27-56]) at the end

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What if the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster never happened?

STS-51-L crew: (front row) Michael J. Smith, Dick Scobee, Ronald McNair; (back row) Ellison Onizuka, Christa McAuliffe, Gregory Jarvis, Judith Resnik.

STS-51-L crew: (front row) Michael J. Smith, Dick Scobee, Ronald McNair; (back row) Ellison Onizuka, Christa McAuliffe, Gregory Jarvis, Judith Resnik.

For people of a certain age, the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster is one of those events where one remembers where they were and what they were doing, not unlike JFK’s assassination or the morning of September 11, 2001.

It was the worst space program disaster since Apollo 1, resulting in the deaths of all astronauts aboard the Challenger. Or so we have been led to believe.

The official details of the disaster are fairly straight forward, as the Wikipedia entry attests:

The Space Shuttle Challenger disaster occurred on January 28, 1986, when the NASA Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger (OV-099) (mission STS-51-L) broke apart 73 seconds into its flight, leading to the deaths of its seven crew members, which included five NASA astronauts and two payload specialists. The spacecraft disintegrated over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Cape Canaveral, Florida at 11:38 EST (16:38 UTC).

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