Tag Archives | History

What if the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster never happened?

STS-51-L crew: (front row) Michael J. Smith, Dick Scobee, Ronald McNair; (back row) Ellison Onizuka, Christa McAuliffe, Gregory Jarvis, Judith Resnik.

STS-51-L crew: (front row) Michael J. Smith, Dick Scobee, Ronald McNair; (back row) Ellison Onizuka, Christa McAuliffe, Gregory Jarvis, Judith Resnik.

For people of a certain age, the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster is one of those events where one remembers where they were and what they were doing, not unlike JFK’s assassination or the morning of September 11, 2001.

It was the worst space program disaster since Apollo 1, resulting in the deaths of all astronauts aboard the Challenger. Or so we have been led to believe.

The official details of the disaster are fairly straight forward, as the Wikipedia entry attests:

The Space Shuttle Challenger disaster occurred on January 28, 1986, when the NASA Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger (OV-099) (mission STS-51-L) broke apart 73 seconds into its flight, leading to the deaths of its seven crew members, which included five NASA astronauts and two payload specialists. The spacecraft disintegrated over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Cape Canaveral, Florida at 11:38 EST (16:38 UTC).

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The Enduring Mystery of the Dyatlov Pass Incident

This much is certain: On the night of February 2, 1959, nine experienced hikers died on the eastern slopes of Kholat Syakhl under highly questionable circumstances. The rest is conjecture, speculation, and mystery.

The ‘Dyatlov Pass Incident’ as it has come to be called is named after the leader of the hiking expedition, Igor Dyatlov.

Initially the group consisted of ten hikers, but Yuri Yefimovich Yudin, the lone survivor,  took ill and had to turn back.

The Dyatlov party prepares to leave on the fateful expedition that would be their last.

The Dyatlov party prepares to leave on the fateful expedition that would be their last. Yuri Yudin, the lone survivor, gets a goodbye hug.

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A Disinformation Compendium: The Prophecies on the Antichrist, End of the World, and the Apocalypse of the Abbot Joachim

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A Disinformation Compendium: The Prophecies on the Antichrist, End of the World, and the Apocalypse of the Abbot Joachim

Vaticinia, sive, Prophetiae Abbatis Ioachimi, [and] Anselmi Episcopi Marsicani; cum imaginibus aere incisis, correctione, et pulcritudine, plurium manuscriptorum exemplari ope, et variar imagin tabulis, et delineationibù, aliis antehac impressis longè praestantiora; quibus Rota, et Oraculum Turcicum maxime considerationis adiecta sunt; una cum praefatione et adnotationibus Paschalini Regiselmi

Translation:

The predictions of , or, the Abbot Joachim of prophecy , [and] the Bishop Anselm Marsicani ; with statues of the air muscles are cut, his amendment, and beauty, it by means of a copy of a number of manuscripts , and to vary the images of the instruments, and delineationibù , when printed, the other far more excellent than the past ; which the wheel , and Oracle Turkish especially considering there were added ; together with the preface, notes and introduction Paschalini Regiselmo

Published 1600

by Joachim, of Fiore, ca.… Read the rest

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Liquid Mercury Found Under Pyramid at Teotihuacan — Because Everyone Loves Ancient Astronaut Theory

The headline reads: “Liquid Mercury Found Under Pyramid At Teotihuacan Could Indicate Royal Tomb”. That’s pretty weird, in and of itself, right? Mercury? Deadly, deadly mercury? What in the world are ancient Mesoamericans doing with mercury?

Teotihuacan

Just because they call it the History Channel…

The myth and mystery surrounding the pyramids at Teotihuacan is already filled to brimming with weirdness, controversy and rancor.

A veritable slugfest of Mainstream vs. Fringe science ensues at the mere mention of the name Teotihuacan and the rancor only grows when shit starts to get weird. Holy Quetzalcoatl Batman!

Well, it just got even weirder. Scrambling to come up with a theory that doesn’t involve space-faring alien overlords, Battlestar Galactica’s series finale or that dude with the crazy hair, the Big Brains @Science!™ have come up with all sorts of equally silly theories, as you shall see. Just because nobody’s found any skeletal remains of ancient Mesoamerican priests who’ve died from mercury poisoning shouldn’t make you throw down the Bullshit card, right?… Read the rest

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The Questions People Asked Advice Columnists in the Early 1700s

abfd02514Apparently people were slightly less banal in 1703 than they are today. At least, the folks who felt compelled to write-in questions.

Adrienne Lafrance at The Atlantic compiled her favorite questions and answers found in The Athenian Mercury Oracle, printed in 1703.

Here are a few (via The Atlantic):

Q: What is anger?
A: Anger is a passion of the irascible appetite caused by apprehension of a present evil, which may be repelled, but with some difficulty.

Q: Why is thunder more terrible in the night time?
A: In the dead of night, noises are rendered more distinct and consequently more terrible by the universal stillness everywhere else.

Q: In what space of time do you think the whole mass of blood circulates through the body!
A: ‘Tis probable in much shorter time than many have imagined… It will be circulated six or seven times over through the heart in the space of an hour.

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The Religion With No Name

This head of Odysseus was discovered in 1957 on the west coast of Italy between Rome and Naples, on the grounds of the former villa of the Roman Emperor Tiberius at Sperlonga. The original sculpture likely dates to the 1st century BC. Source: Wikimedia Commons

This head of Odysseus was discovered in 1957 on the west coast of Italy between Rome and Naples, on the grounds of the former villa of the Roman Emperor Tiberius at Sperlonga. The original sculpture likely dates to the 1st century BC.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Brian C. Muraresku via grahamhancock.com

“The man of a traditional culture sees himself as real only to the extent that he ceases to be himself. Plato could be regarded as the outstanding philosopher of ‘primitive mentality’ – the thinker who succeeded in giving philosophic currency and validity to the modes of life and behavior of archaic humanity.”1

Mircea Eliade

The Real Hippies

What’s become of religion these days? Seriously. More than a billion people across the planet are religiously unaffiliated. That includes one in every five Americans and Europeans, and – believe it or not – almost half of the British public. Impressive as those numbers are today, just imagine the future of the Western world.

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We Stand to Lose Everything

Aaron Dames writes for Divided Core.

 

We are like butterflies who flutter for a day and think it is forever.
— Carl Sagan

As the 100th anniversary of World War I rolls around, dignitaries and diplomats are commemorating the costly victories and tragic losses of that brutal and gaseous four-year melee which resulted in the deaths of somewhere between ten to sixteen million people. World War I set the stage for its horrific sequel, World War II, which showcased another four years of agonizing mayhem, replicated genocides, and the creation of a Hell on Earth. Millions of people died on battlefields, in death camps, and of disease, starvation, and lack of sanitation in galactic pits of unfathomable misery and suffering. World War II then set the stage for the Cold War, in which the United States, the Soviet Union, and eventually other jingoistic nuclear powers, held humanity hostage through aggressive threats of apocalyptic war.… Read the rest

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The past is not sacred: the ‘history wars’ over Anzac

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Marilyn Lake and Henry Reynolds’ What’s Wrong With Anzac? NewSouth

Peter Cochrane, University of Sydney

The Gallipoli centenary provides a unique opportunity to reflect on the many wartime legacies – human, political, economic, military – that forged independent nations from former colonies and dominions. The Conversation, in partnership with Griffith Review, has published a series of essays exploring the enduring legacies of 20th-century wars.


The term “history wars” is best known in Australia for summing up the fierce debate over the nature and extent of frontier conflict, with profound implications for the legitimacy of the British settlement and thus for national legitimacy today.

That debate, though hardly resolved, is now taking something of a back seat to a public controversy focused on Australia’s wars of the 20th century and particularly on the war of 1914–18, called the Great War until the Second World War redefined it as the First.… Read the rest

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Hubble Space Telescope: 25 Years Exploring the Cosmos

Hubble captured this mountain of dust and gas rising in the Carina Nebula. The top of a three-light-year tall pillar of cool hydrogen is being worn away by the radiation of nearby stars, while stars within the pillar unleash jets of gas that stream from the peaks. Photo by NASA, ESA, and M. Livio and the Hubble 20th Anniversary Team (STScI)

Hubble captured this mountain of dust and gas rising in the Carina Nebula. The top of a three-light-year tall pillar of cool hydrogen is being worn away by the radiation of nearby stars, while stars within the pillar unleash jets of gas that stream from the peaks. Photo by NASA, ESA, and M. Livio and the Hubble 20th Anniversary Team (STScI)

Jasmine Wright and Margaret Myers Via PBS.org:

Hubble’s contributions to space exploration are countless. Its images, explains Hubble Space Telescope Senior Project Scientist Jennifer Wiseman, have shown the first definitive detection of supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies. They also have provided measurement of the expansion rate of the universe, and detection (along with ground-based telescopes) of acceleration in that expansion, caused by mysterious “dark energy” that appears to be pushing the universe apart.

“Hubble will go down in history as having changed the textbooks by totally revolutionizing humanity’s view of the universe, and our place in it,” Wiseman says.

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Debunking the Debunkers of October Surprise

81oYiGW8hKL._SL1350_Y’know how a bunch of Republicans sent a letter to Iran a few weeks ago?  It got me thinking about history…

Robert Parry, writing at Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting in 2013:

Editor’s Note: This is an excerpt from investigative reporter Robert Parry’s new book, America’s Stolen Narrative. One of the book’s storylines examines corporate media’s role in squelching investigation into whether Ronald Reagan’s presidential campaign in 1980 went behind President Jimmy Carter’s back to contact Iranian officials then holding 52 Americans hostage, a controversy dubbed the October Surprise.

When the possibility of a serious October Surprise investigation emerged in the latter half of 1991, an intimidating phalanx of powerful players was arrayed against it, from Ronald Reagan’s many defenders, to the sitting President George H.W. Bush, to David Rockefeller’s business and government circles, to past and present officers in the CIA, to the Israeli government.

If Congress conducted a tough-minded investigation, there was no telling where it might go and who might be harmed.

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