Tag Archives | History

The life and death of the creative computer virus

QG2mL8f-QEz9j-JrVe7cmQ-defaultRhett Jones via Hopes&Fears:

The early 90’s were a renaissance for a certain type of computer virus. Today, we think of a virus as an insidious thing that hides and wreaks various forms of havoc like destroying a nuclear facility; never peaking its head up intentionally. But there was a time when viruses were more playful and made their presence known with creative and occasionally funny graphics or animations via “payloads.” We recreated the payloads of old school viruses featured in the “wanted list” from Central Point’s ’91 anti-virus ad in high-res glory. “You could get by with an anti-virus program. Then again, so could these,” the ad warns. Check ’em out (below) from the safe confines of your browser window, downloadable for your creative remixing needs.

While early computer viruses were certainly capable of destruction and minor havoc, they were often designed simply for the hackers’ own amusement and to deliver what’s known as a “payload.”It might be a message that tells you that cybertron69 has owned you, or it might be an elaborate animation with a political message.

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Was the Chicago fire the result of a comet impact?


As someone who lives in Michigan, I agree that there are indeed some very weird natural phenomena on the great lakes which could use more study. Testament to the argument that nothing is ever said and finished in science.

Contrary to popular folklore, the Chicago fire is not the worst in U.S. history. It was not even the worst to occur on October 8 that year. The same evening—in fact, at the same time, about 9:30—a fierce wildfire struck in Peshtigo, Wisconsin, over 200 miles to the north of Chicago, destroying the town and a dozen other villages. Estimates of those killed range upward from 1200 to 2500 in a single night. It was not the Chicago fire but the simultaneous “Peshtigo Fire” that was the deadliest in U.S. history.

And there is more. On the same evening, across Lake Michigan, another fire also wreaked havoc. Though smaller fires had been burning for some time—not unusual under the reported conditions—the most intense outburst appears to have erupted simultaneously with the Chicago and Peshtigo fires.

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Mary Bell: Child Killer

In 1968, 11-year-old Mary Bell strangled two boys, aged three and four, in Scotswood, an inner-city suburb of Newcastle upon Tyne.

via Wikipedia:

Independent accounts from family members strongly suggest that Mary’s mother, 17-year-old prostitute, Betty had more than once attempted to kill Mary and make her death look accidental during the first few years of her life. Her family was suspicious when Mary ‘fell’ from a window, and when she ‘accidentally’ consumed sleeping pills. On one such occasion, an independent witness saw Betty giving the pills to her daughter as sweets. Mary herself says she was subjected to repeated sexual abuse, her mother forcing her from the age of four to engage in sexual acts with men.

On 25 May 1968, the day before her 11th birthday, Mary Bell strangled four-year-old Martin Brown in a derelict house. She was believed to have committed this crime alone. Between that time and a second killing, she and a friend, Norma Joyce Bell (1955–89; no relation), aged 13, broke into and vandalised a nursery in Scotswood, leaving notes that claimed responsibility for the killing.

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Psy-Op: Executive Order Creates an Orwellian Policy of Enlightenment and Propaganda


This article originally appeared on Activist Post.

By Daisy Luther

The ink is still wet on a brand new executive order that reads like a cross between the Reich’s Ministry of Enlightenment and Propaganda and George Orwell’s Ministry of Truth.

Of course, in true propagandist form, President Obama isn’t calling it anything related to Nazi Germany or a dystopian novel.   He’s calling it “Using Behavioral Science Insights to Better Serve the American People.”

To-may-to. To-mah-to.

Whatever you want to call it, prepare to be the subject of manipulation and behavioral experiments. This is a giant, official national psy-op and they’re announcing to us that they’re doing it.

What’s a Psy-Op?

Psychological Operations or PSYOP are planned operations to convey selected information and indicators to audiences to influence their emotions, motives, objective reasoning, and ultimately the behavior of organizations, groups, and individuals. (source)

(You can learn more about the use of Psy-Ops in this US Army procedural manual.)

The beginning of the Executive Order explains:

A growing body of evidence demonstrates that behavioral science insights — research findings from fields such as behavioral economics and psychology about how people make decisions and act on them — can be used to design government policies to better serve the American people.

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The Age of Finance Capital—and the Irrelevance of Mainstream Economics

The Greek Tragedy: A Labyrinth of Debt
Ismael Hossein-Zadeh writes at CounterPunch:

Despite the fact that the manufacturers of ideas have elevated economics to the (contradictory) levels of both a science and a religion, a market theodicy, mainstream economics does not explain much when it comes to an understanding of real world developments. Indeed, as a neatly stylized discipline, economics has evolved into a corrupt, obfuscating and useless—nay, harmful—field of study. Harmful, because instead of explaining and clarifying it tends to mystify and justify.

One of the many flaws of the discipline is its static or ahistorical character, that is, a grave absence of a historical perspective. Despite significant changes over time in the market structure, the discipline continues to cling to the abstract, idealized model of competitive industrial capitalism of times long past.

Not surprisingly, much of the current economic literature and most economic “experts” still try to explain the recent cycles of financial bubbles and bursts by the outdated traditional theories of economic/business cycles.

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The Tragic Death of Jumbo the Elephant


On this day in 1885, P.T. Barnum’s famous circus elephant, Jumbo, died when he was struck by a train saving the dwarf elephant, Tom Thumb.

Charlie Hintz at Cult of Weird tells the story:

On September 15, 1885, Jumbo was struck and killed by a freight train while the circus was unloading on the rails in Canada. As Barnum told the story, Jumbo was trying to save a dwarf elephant named Tom Thumb from the oncoming train when it hit him, instead. Tom Thumb survived with nothing more than a broken leg.

Jumbo, however, was dragged by the train 300 feet down the track before it derailed. He held Scotty’s hand with his trunk as he laid dying. It only took a few minutes. During the cleanup, Scotty reportedly flew into a rage when he discovered a souvenir collector had cut off part of Jumbo’s ear.

Taxidermists from Ward’s Natural Science Establishment in Rochester, New York, where Carl Akeley was apprenticing at the time, soon arrived.

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The A=432 Hz Frequency: DNA Tuning and the Bastardization of Music


Brendan D. Murphy via Waking Times:

GA=440Hz: Not Quite Music to My Ears

Humankind is the largely unwitting victim of afrequency war on our consciousness that has been waged for decades, if not millennia. The goal has clearly been to keep us as gullible and subservient as possible, through multifarious means.

In modern history in particular, there has been what Dr. Len Horowitz has referred to as the strategic “militarization” of music. This happened in 1939 when the tuning of the note ‘A above Middle C’ to 440 Hz was adopted in the world of music. In 1910 an earlier push to effect the same change was met with limited success. Three decades later, the British Standards Institute (BSI) adopted the A=440Hz standard following staunch promotion by the Rockefeller-Nazi consortium—“at the precise time WWII preparations were being finalized by the petrochemical-pharmaceutical war financiers.”[i] This was the year that A=440 became the international standard.

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Here’s How the Crew of the 1813 Shipwreck in Alaska Survived

"Russian Sloop-of-War Neva" by Drawn by Capt Lisiansky, engraved by I. Clark. (Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons)

“Russian Sloop-of-War Neva” by Drawn by Capt Lisiansky, engraved by I. Clark. (Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons)

National Science Foundation via EurekAlert:

Working closely with the U.S. Forest Service and the Sitka Tribe of Alaska, an international team of researchers funded by the National Science Foundation has begun to piece together an archaeological and historical narrative of how the crew of the wrecked 19th century Russian-American Company sailing ship Neva survived the harsh subarctic winter.

“The items left behind by survivors provide a unique snapshot-in-time for January 1813, and might help us to understand the adaptations that allowed them to await rescue in a frigid, unfamiliar environment for almost a month,” said Dave McMahan of the Sitka Historical Society.

McMahan is the principal investigator for the NSF award, which was made by the Arctic Sciences Section in NSF’s Division of Polar Programs.

The wreck of the frigate Neva, which occurred near the city of Sitka, has been surrounded by stories and legends for two centuries.

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Canada’s secret plan to invade the U.S. — in 1921

Defence Scheme No. 1: A Canadian lieutenant fashioned a five-pronged plan of attack against the U.S. in 1921. Courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press

Defence Scheme No. 1: A Canadian lieutenant fashioned a five-pronged plan of attack against the U.S. in 1921. Courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press

In 1921, Canadian lieutenant, Buster Brown, proposed “Defence Scheme No. 1.,” which was actually a plan for a “full-on invasion” of the United States. In response, US then drafted its own: “War Plan Red.”

Not surprisingly, the tensions were really between the US and Britain. Canada was just the middle man.

Tracy Mumford via MPRNews:

Obviously, it never came to fruition. The tensions driving the potential invasion were actually between the U.S. and Britain. Canada was simply a proxy. After World War I, Britain owed the U.S. a tremendous amount of money — approximately $22 billion — and there were intense disagreements over the payment terms.

The disagreements were heated enough for the U.S. to draft a plan of its own in 1930, which it dubbed “War Plan Red.”

“Americans at that time, everybody seemed to think it was just a matter of time before Canada would be absorbed into the U.S.,” Lippert said.

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