Tag Archives | Horror

New Psychedelic Vampire Sexploitation from Director Phil Mucci

Longtime readers are probably aware of my fondness for the uber trippy metal videos of director Phil Mucci, whose work I stumbled on last autumn through one of my all time favorite bands Monster Magnet (more on them soon). As a matter of fact, if you haven’t read my top 5 list of his micro-films or the interview he was kind enough to do with me earlier in the year, I highly recommend checking those out ASAP.

In the meantime, dig on his new gore-tastic short for the song Sorrow by the amazingly dialed-in metal outfit Huntress. The whole thing is sort of a mash-up between the classic 70s sexploitation flick Vampyros Lesbos and the bleak as fuck Witchfinder General, which I synchronously ended up watching several months back. Another way of putting that would be, it’s awesome. Props to Phil and his crew at Diabolik and maybe, just maybe, we’re inching closer to someone finally giving this guy the keys to a full length.… Read the rest

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Original Psycho Door from Wisconsin Funeral Home Up for Auction


The iconic door from Norman Bates’ home in Psycho will be going up for auction next week with an estimated buying price of anywhere from $20-$30,000.

Up until recently, the Dallmann-Kniewel Funeral Home Rib Lake, Wisconsin was using it as the front door.

Charlie Hintz via Cult of Weird:

At the end of this month, Profiles in History will be auctioning off a trove of Hollywood history. Many are props from beloved horror movies – things like a monster from Ghoulies, the Hellraiser puzzle box, Herman Munster’s head, the mask of Frank the Bunny from Donnie Darko.

But one in particular is worth taking a closer look at, not only because it is a great piece of film history, but because it has an odd connection to the story it was used to portray…The original door from the house of Norman Bates in the 1960 Hitchcock classic Psycho.

And up until recently, it was being used as the front door of the Dallmann-Kniewel Funeral Home in Rib Lake, Wisconsin.

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Remembering Wes Craven

Cinema lost a giant last night as horror master Wes Craven passed away from brain cancer. Craven was a powerhouse in the horror world, bringing us classics such as The Last House on the Left, The Hills Have Eyes, and the Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream franchises.

While we horror aficionados will lament his passing, we can rest assured that his legacy will live on.

Notable Quotes:

“I believe the cinema is one of our principal forms of art. It is an incredibly powerful way to tell uplifting stories that can move people to cry with joy and inspire them to reach for the stars.”

“I think there is something about the American dream, the sort of Disneyesque dream, if you will, of the beautifully trimmed front lawn, the white picket fence, mom and dad and their happy children, God-fearing and doing good whenever they can, and the flip side of it, the kind of anger and the sense of outrage that comes from discovering that that’s not the truth of the matter, that gives American horror films, in some ways, kind of an additional rage.”

“The horrors of retirement.… Read the rest

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The Dunwich Horror by H.P. Lovecraft

Narrated by Caden Clegg

Via Chilling Tales For Dark Nights on YouTube:

“The Dunwich Horror,” written in 1928 and first published in Weird Tales in April 1929, is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft, and takes place in the isolated, desolate and decrepit village of Dunwich. It revolves around Wilbur Whateley, the hideous son of Lavinia Whateley, a deformed and unstable albino mother, and an unknown father. Strange events surround Wilbur’s birth and precocious development. He matures at an abnormal rate, reaching manhood within a decade. Locals shun him and his family, and animals fear and despise him. All the while, his sorcerer grandfather indoctrinates him into certain dark rituals and the study of witchcraft. Various locals grow suspicious after Old Whateley buys more and more cattle, yet the number of his herd never increases, and the cattle in his field become mysteriously afflicted with severe open wounds.

You can read along here.Read the rest

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Horror Occult Geekery: The Psychedelic Secret of Dario Argento’s SUSPIRIA

This article contains spoilers for the 1977 film SUSPIRIA.

Watch it.

Preferably while comfortably dosed up on your favourite psychedelic substance.


I’ve been an ardent fan of the shadowy occult strangeness found in late 70s-early 80s Italian horror flicks for a good chunk of this incarnation, for reasons I used to find hard to fathom.

I’ve often felt too that there was some concrete textual core shared between a lot of these movies, specifically the films that came in the wake of the briefly popular “Giallo” subgenre. Giallo, a genre where POV killers adorned with black leather gloves go on fetishised killing sprees as clueless detectives scratch their heads in an artistically blood-spattered wake. In which the camera was the killer.

These post-Giallos, mainly of Argento’s own making, but also the more ethereal Zombie films of Lucio Fulci, i.e. Gates of Hell (aka City of The Living Dead) and The Beyond (aka Seven Doors of Death), seem to share some dark strand of DNA between them.… Read the rest

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How to Survive a Slasher Film

If you’re at all interested in slasher films, I recommend checking out the mockumentary, “Behind the Mask: The Rise of Leslie Vernon.” It does an excellent job deconstructing slasher movie tropes and themes, while also being wholly entertaining (and funny).

Romeo Vitelli, Ph.D writes at Psychology Today:

Ever since John Carpenter’s horror classic film, Halloween first premiered in 1978, the slasher film has been a familiar staple for horror movie viewers. In the decades that followed, there have been an astonishing number of slasher films though they all tend to follow the same basic formula.

This includes scenes of graphic violence, usually featuring a (typically female) protagonist attempting to stay alive while a faceless evil stalked and killed all the other victims, often in bizarre and creative ways. Despite the gratuitous violence and  stereotypical cliches relating to sexism, slasher films have a strange popularity with movie audiences and have even made unlikely film stars out of relentless killers such as Freddy Krueger and Jason Voorhees.

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