Tag Archives | Hunter S. Thompson

Hunter S. Thompson’s Daily Drug and Drink Routine

H/T Dangerous Minds

Taken from HUNTER: The Strange and Savage Life of Hunter S. Thompson by E. Jean Carroll:
You can get a free copy here.

3:00 p.m. rise
3:05 Chivas Regal with the morning papers, Dunhills
3:45 cocaine
3:50 another glass of Chivas, Dunhill
4:05 first cup of coffee, Dunhill
4:15 cocaine
4:16 orange juice, Dunhill
4:30 cocaine
4:54 cocaine
5:05 cocaine
5:11 coffee, Dunhills
5:30 more ice in the Chivas
5:45 cocaine, etc., etc.
6:00 grass to take the edge off the day
7:05 Woody Creek Tavern for lunch-Heineken, two margaritas, coleslaw, a taco salad, a double order of fried onion rings, carrot cake, ice cream, a bean fritter, Dunhills, another Heineken, cocaine, and for the ride home, a snow cone (a glass of shredded ice over which is poured three or four jig­gers of Chivas)
9:00 starts snorting cocaine seriously
10:00 drops acid
11:00 Chartreuse, cocaine, grass
11:30 cocaine, etc, etc.

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Hunter S. Thompson’s Superb Advice on How to Find Your Purpose and Live a Meaningful Life

Hunter S. Thompson graffiti 2Maria Popova takes a look at the advice of Hunter S. Thompson given in a letter to a friend when he was 20-years-old. From Brain Pickings:

As a hopeless lover of both letters and famous advice, I was delighted to discover a letter 20-year-old Hunter S. Thompson — gonzo journalism godfather, pundit of media politics, dark philosopher — penned to his friend Hume Logan in 1958. Found in Letters of Note: Correspondence Deserving of a Wider Audience (public library) — the aptly titled, superb collection based on Shaun Usher’s indispensable website of the same name — the letter is an exquisite addition to luminaries’ reflections on the meaning of life, speaking to what it really means to find your purpose.

Cautious that “all advice can only be a product of the man who gives it” — a caveat other literary legends have stressed with varying degrees of irreverence — Thompson begins with a necessary disclaimer about the very notion of advice-giving:

To give advice to a man who asks what to do with his life implies something very close to egomania.

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How Hunter S. Thompson and Psilocybin Influenced the Art of Ralph Steadman

ralph-steadman-fear-and-loathing-in-las-vegas-by-hunter-s-thompsonOpen Culture revisits the influence of Hunter S. Thompson on the art of Ralph Steadman.

Via Open Cuture.

Though the two men only occasionally collaborated over their long friendship, the work of Kentucky-born “gonzo” journalist Hunter S. Thompson and that of British illustrator Ralph Steadman enjoy a cultural symbiosis: Thompson’s style of writing puts you in the mind of Steadman’s style of drawing, and vice versa even more so. At this point, I have a hard time imagining any suitable visual accompaniment to the simultaneously clear- and wild-eyed sensibility of Thompsonian prose — “I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone,” he famously said, “but they’ve always worked for me” — other than the bold strokes and violent blotches with which Steadman renders visions of highly controlled madness. The clip above, from Alex Gibney’s documentary Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson, explores the origins of their aesthetic and psychological partnership.

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William S. Burroughs: Paint it Blacker

As many readers of these here illuminated letters surely know, the great author/Beat ghost/junky/exterminator William S. Burroughs also added the title of “painter” to his resume before his death in 1997. He began painting in his later years while living in Lawrence Kansas, but his relationship with painting and painters began much earlier.

I like to trace Burroughs’ origins as a painter back to his 1959 meeting with Brion Gysin. Gysin was also a polymath and his written work is as underrated as his paintings were during his lifetime. Gysin died in 1986 and while his sometimes-stunning prose has yet to be reconsidered, the publication of a few great books and the organizing of gallery retrospectives have seen his visual art getting the respect it deserves all these years later. Of course, Burroughs was way ahead of the curve: “I don’t think I’d seen painting until I saw the painting of Brion Gysin,” he once snarled.… Read the rest

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Clark “Gonzomentary” on Film Threat and LA Web Fest

From Gonzomentary.com

What results from Warwick’s footage is a “gonzomentary,” a mix of fourth-wall busting filmmaking, mockumentary, Gonzo journalism and whatever else can be added into the mix, which includes: Uncle Binky the pedophile clown; a Christian producer/investor who wants the film to contain no swearing, no drinking and no drugs, right before she has a crisis of faith and becomes a mime; a silent film; Tito the drug dealer, who is actually a British actor (David Proch) stuck in a Method acting Hell and Warwick’s own descent into madness while chronicling the adventures of Clark and J.C. And penises. Lots of penises.

Clark: A Gonzomentary Part 1 is a whole bucket of crazy, and I really enjoyed it for all of its insanity. At no point did I really have a grasp on what I was watching, as it constantly turns in and over on itself. Even when I’d come up with a criticism to lodge at it, the film itself would find a way to address it.

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Hunter S. Thompson: A Day in the Life

I couldn’t find a date on this AP article (above) which chronicles a day in the life – and in the cups – with Hunter S. Thompson. His love of Chivas on full display, Thompson also stresses the importance of a big breakfast – what else would one expect from a proud son of the Bluegrass State?

I found this through Julia Segal’s Tumblr.

There is definitely a drinking game spin-off begging to stumble through this impossible-seeming itinerary.

While you’re at it, check out this cover letter a young Thompson wrote to the Vancouver Sun in 1958,

Stay Awake!

Joe

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Clark: A Gonzomentary

In the spirit of mockumentaries like Spinal Tap, Hunter S Thompson's Gonzo style, and the art world in general, Clark is an indie web series that has been ravaging the minds of viewers for months now. To make things more confusing, the actors are going on camera presenting their method as heavily based on occultism and gnosticism. It's not clear where the line between fiction and reality is, but it seems a fun ride for the hale at heart.
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Rare Hunter S. Thompson Documentary Surfaces on YouTube

It's been nearly 5 years since The Good Doctor said adiós and pulled that silver trigger, bringing Gonzo to an end for good - or so one would think. Since his suicide at his Colorado ranch, Thompson seems more present than ever. A number of competing biographies have filled the stores, several new films about the man have flickered into the theaters, DVD shelves and bit torrent sites, and nary a week goes by that we don't stumble across some bit of news regarding the troubled production of the Johnny Depp film of Hunter's first novel,  The Rum Diary. In the midst of all the hubbub, I overlooked a grimy little treasure: The Crazy Never Die. Crazy' is an odd film with a strange provenance that gives the viewer a front-row seat at a rather lucid 80's-era university lecture by Thompson.
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