Tag Archives | image

Meet the Man Who Created the Most Radical Hero in Comics

Via Wired.com

Genius_1

The cover of Genius #1, art by Afua Richardson, story by Marc Bernardin and Adam Freeman.

Ed.—Today marks the release of Genius #1, the first in a five-part comic-book miniseries about a young woman from South Central L.A. who unites the city’s gangs and attempts to secede from the U.S. As one of our resident comics lovers said, it’s “fast-moving, smart, and appropriately cynical”; it’s also the rare instance of a black heroine, co-written and drawn by black creators, in a mainstream comic book. We asked co-writer Marc Bernardin (a veteran who’s done books for Marvel, been a deputy editor at Playboy, and written for the TV show Alphas) to write a piece charting his childhood voyage through the nerd-culture landscape—a landscape that rarely felt like a place he belonged.

Pop culture wasn’t made for me.

I noticed that even as a kid, growing up in the Bronx in the 1970s.

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Your Brain Sees Things You Don’t

spoonVia ScienceDaily:

University of Arizona doctoral degree candidate Jay Sanguinetti has authored a new study, published online in the journal Psychological Science, that indicates that the brain processes and understands visual input that we may never consciously perceive.

The finding challenges currently accepted models about how the brain processes visual information.

A doctoral candidate in the UA’s Department of Psychology in the College of Science, Sanguinetti showed study participants a series of black silhouettes, some of which contained meaningful, real-world objects hidden in the white spaces on the outsides.

Saguinetti worked with his adviser Mary Peterson, a professor of psychology and director of the UA’s Cognitive Science Program, and with John Allen, a UA Distinguished Professor of psychology, cognitive science and neuroscience, to monitor subjects’ brainwaves with an electroencephalogram, or EEG, while they viewed the objects.

“We were asking the question of whether the brain was processing the meaning of the objects that are on the outside of these silhouettes,” Sanguinetti said.

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