Tag Archives | India

Indian Man Is Addicted To Eating Nothing But Bricks

Is this the ultimate hearty, raw diet? Via Metro News:

Pakkirappa Hunagundi suffers from a rare eating disorder and says he is addicted to eating only bricks, gravel and mud. “I only like mud and bricks, nothing else,” he told Barcroft TV. “I will eat it because it is my habit. I need it every day. I can’t stop.”

The 30-year-old has been eating bricks since the age of ten. He now eats up to one brick a day and three kilos of mud and gravel to fulfill his craving. It is believed he suffers from a condition known as Pica, the persistent eating of non-food items with no nutritional value.

Mr Hunagundi has ignored pleas from friends and family to change his diet and now plans to travel across India to show off his brick-eating abilities. He says he hasn’t suffered any ill-effects from his unusual diet.

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Indian College Student Jumps Into Tiger Enclosure Looking For a Fight

PIC: Uncredited tourist/CoverAsiaPress

PIC: Uncredited tourist/CoverAsiaPress

Intoxication and/or psychiatric illness are suspected to have played a role in the man’s decision to challenge two tigers to a cage fight. (You think?) Thankfully, the tigers seemed to have been spooked by the man and left him unharmed.

Via Oddity Central:

College students are known to do the stupidest things at times, but this one just takes the cake. Yashonandan Kaushik, a 23-year-old student of Engineering from Madhya Pradesh, India, actually jumped into a tiger’s enclosure at Gwalior Zoo. The bizarre incident that took place around 5pm on Monday stunned spectators and zoo staff alike. Kaushik completely ignored their cries to come out. He took off his shirt, challenged the tigers to a fight and tried to chase one of the beasts into its cave. Surprisingly, he made it out of the enclosure unharmed.

 

 … Read the rest

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Die-Off of India’s Vulture Population Creates Crisis for Zoroastrian Sky Burials

Pic: Cornelius Brown (PD)

Pic: Cornelius Brown (PD)

India has always been a land with a robust vulture population, owing to its 500 million cattle population (almost half of the world’s 1.3 billion) and the taboo associated with eating beef (80% of the country is Hindu).  However this situation has drastically changed in just a generation.

From 1992 to 2007, the Indian population of some 400 million vultures of 9 species has dropped 99.9% due to the widespread use of a drug used to treat inflammatory disorders and pain in cattle called diclofenac.  The indigenous White-rumped Vulture alone, with a population of some 80 million, was described in 1985 as “possibly the most abundant large bird of prey in the world.”  Today the White-rumped Vulture is listed as Critically Endangered.  Tragically, a vulture that eats the flesh of a cow to whom diclofenac was recently administered quickly perishes from acute kidney failure.

This vulture population collapse has led to severe problems in India from undisposed cattle corpses.  Whereas previously a bull could be cleaned in as little as 20 minutes by a pack of vultures, now the carcass putrifies and may cause water contamination from runoff.  Moreover, the open niche has led to a sharp rise in the numbers of roaming wild dogs.  Whereas vultures are an ecological dead-end for pestilence owing to their super-acidic digestive system, dogs and rats are much more liable to spread disease.  Anthrax, plague, and the most fatal disease known to man: rabies, have seen a marked rise since the beginning of the vulture crisis.  Today in India, 30,000 people die from rabies each year, more than half the world’s total.… Read the rest

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Indian Farmer With Human Tail Worshipped As A God

human tailToday’s accidental religious savior via the Huffington Post:

A 35-year-old tea picker in Alipurduar, India, is getting tailed by followers every day — mainly because the 14.5-inch tail growing out of his back makes them think he’s a living god. Chandre Oraon has had his tail since birth and some Hindus believe it’s a sign he’s an incarnation of a monkey god known as “Hanuman,” Barcroft TV reported.

Worshippers from all over India travel to his home in hopes of touching his tail and getting blessings. One woman, Monika Lakda, said she travelled overnight to see Oraon at his small makeshift shrine, hoping he would be able to cure her nephew’s fever.

About 40 cases of human tails have been reported according to a study by the People’s Journal of Scientifc Research.

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‘Lack of Genocidal Application’ Keeps Science From Exploring Thorium Energy

Thor Donner Arthur Rackham Wagner Rhinegold Rheingold Ring Nibelungern Norse mythology myth German GermanicHow ‘Thor’ May Save the World:

Unbeknownst to most climatologists that decry nuclear energy for its environmental liability (in the form of radioactive waste and potential Chernobyl/Fukushima meltdown), there is a friendly and feasible cousin to the Uranium reactor that uses Thorium (yes named after the Norse god of thunder).

Thorium is an element much more abundant than Uranium in the Earth’s crust (comparable in abundance to Lead), and is already produced industrially as a byproduct of rare-earth-metals mining.  Thorium reactor designs (using liquid Fluoride as coolant) consume atomic fuel far more efficiently than Uranium reactors using pressurized water as a coolant.  Furthermore, these reactors are ‘incapable of meltdown’ and produce hazardous radioactive materials lasting only 300 years as opposed to 10,000 years for Uranium, in relative quantities of 1 ton instead of 35 tons, respectively.  Unlike Uranium reactors, Thorium does not pose a proliferation risk because none of the products or reactants present viable materials for creating an atomic bomb.… Read the rest

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Jodorowsky’s Lost Film

Tusk1980 wasn’t a great year for Alejandro Jodorowsky. Having just barely survived the end of the 1970′s when the film that was to be his magnum opus — an adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic Dune — fell apart for the final time, Jodo was anxious to get back to work. He agreed to make a children’s film.

At first, the idea of the anarchist auteur making a movie for kids might sound odd, but Tusk (Poo Lorn L’Elephant) told a tale about the shared fate of an English girl and an Indian elephant. The story had the kind of spiritual overtones that Jodo had marshaled so furiously in The Holy Mountain and the coming of age tale shared some similarities with El Topo — even the Indian locations promised exotic settings that surely inspired the director.

Alas, a classic it was not meant to be. Tusk is roundly criticized by those who’ve been able to see it — the only home release is an un-subtitled French language version on VHS.… Read the rest

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India Turns To Astrophysicists To Investigate UFOs Along Himalayan Border

ufos

Does the Indian military suspect that alternate dimensions could be part of the answer? Via the Telegraph:

Since the end of last year its security services have been investigating sightings of ‘yellow spheres’ rising over its Himalayan border with China. The mysterious orbs are reported to rise and hover along the horizon for around three hours before fading from sight.

They initially suspected them to be Chinese unmanned aircraft or drones. China’s Army is understood to have strongly denied any drone deployment but India’s Defence Research Development Organisation (DRDO) has so far failed to identify the unidentified flying objects. The objects appeared to be at to high an altitude for its instruments to probe.

To establish exactly the nature and origin of the yellow globes, the defence establishment has now turned to its Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore. Its new director Dr. P. Sreekumar confirmed it was investigating the phenomenon but had yet to unravel the mystery.

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The Explosive Pop Art Cinema Of Pramod Pati

Avant-garde filmmaker Pramod Pati created luscious, poetic, beautifully-scored short films on behalf of the Indian government (sometimes with social-educational purposes such as promoting family planning). Highlights include Abid, below, and 1968′s symbolism-rich Explorer. The Seventh Art provides some background:

Pramod Pati, who died an untimely death at the age of 42, worked for the Films Division of the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in India, which commissioned feature-length and short documentaries as well as short animation films for the purposes of cultural archiving and nationwide information dissemination. The documentaries generally consisted of profiles of artistes practicing traditional forms, educational films for adults, and simple moral tales and basic literacy courses for children.

Although there was an obvious restriction on the type of subjects filmmakers can choose, the Films Division, like the Kanun in Iran, was free from commercial concerns and thus presented a higher scope for formal experimentation for directors.

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