Tag Archives | India

‘Lack of Genocidal Application’ Keeps Science From Exploring Thorium Energy

Thor Donner Arthur Rackham Wagner Rhinegold Rheingold Ring Nibelungern Norse mythology myth German GermanicHow ‘Thor’ May Save the World:

Unbeknownst to most climatologists that decry nuclear energy for its environmental liability (in the form of radioactive waste and potential Chernobyl/Fukushima meltdown), there is a friendly and feasible cousin to the Uranium reactor that uses Thorium (yes named after the Norse god of thunder).

Thorium is an element much more abundant than Uranium in the Earth’s crust (comparable in abundance to Lead), and is already produced industrially as a byproduct of rare-earth-metals mining.  Thorium reactor designs (using liquid Fluoride as coolant) consume atomic fuel far more efficiently than Uranium reactors using pressurized water as a coolant.  Furthermore, these reactors are ‘incapable of meltdown’ and produce hazardous radioactive materials lasting only 300 years as opposed to 10,000 years for Uranium, in relative quantities of 1 ton instead of 35 tons, respectively.  Unlike Uranium reactors, Thorium does not pose a proliferation risk because none of the products or reactants present viable materials for creating an atomic bomb.… Read the rest

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Jodorowsky’s Lost Film

Tusk1980 wasn’t a great year for Alejandro Jodorowsky. Having just barely survived the end of the 1970’s when the film that was to be his magnum opus — an adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic Dune — fell apart for the final time, Jodo was anxious to get back to work. He agreed to make a children’s film.

At first, the idea of the anarchist auteur making a movie for kids might sound odd, but Tusk (Poo Lorn L’Elephant) told a tale about the shared fate of an English girl and an Indian elephant. The story had the kind of spiritual overtones that Jodo had marshaled so furiously in The Holy Mountain and the coming of age tale shared some similarities with El Topo — even the Indian locations promised exotic settings that surely inspired the director.

Alas, a classic it was not meant to be. Tusk is roundly criticized by those who’ve been able to see it — the only home release is an un-subtitled French language version on VHS.… Read the rest

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India Turns To Astrophysicists To Investigate UFOs Along Himalayan Border

ufos

Does the Indian military suspect that alternate dimensions could be part of the answer? Via the Telegraph:

Since the end of last year its security services have been investigating sightings of ‘yellow spheres’ rising over its Himalayan border with China. The mysterious orbs are reported to rise and hover along the horizon for around three hours before fading from sight.

They initially suspected them to be Chinese unmanned aircraft or drones. China’s Army is understood to have strongly denied any drone deployment but India’s Defence Research Development Organisation (DRDO) has so far failed to identify the unidentified flying objects. The objects appeared to be at to high an altitude for its instruments to probe.

To establish exactly the nature and origin of the yellow globes, the defence establishment has now turned to its Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore. Its new director Dr. P. Sreekumar confirmed it was investigating the phenomenon but had yet to unravel the mystery.

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The Explosive Pop Art Cinema Of Pramod Pati

Avant-garde filmmaker Pramod Pati created luscious, poetic, beautifully-scored short films on behalf of the Indian government (sometimes with social-educational purposes such as promoting family planning). Highlights include Abid, below, and 1968's symbolism-rich Explorer. The Seventh Art provides some background:
Pramod Pati, who died an untimely death at the age of 42, worked for the Films Division of the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in India, which commissioned feature-length and short documentaries as well as short animation films for the purposes of cultural archiving and nationwide information dissemination. The documentaries generally consisted of profiles of artistes practicing traditional forms, educational films for adults, and simple moral tales and basic literacy courses for children. Although there was an obvious restriction on the type of subjects filmmakers can choose, the Films Division, like the Kanun in Iran, was free from commercial concerns and thus presented a higher scope for formal experimentation for directors.
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India To Recognize Dolphins As “Non-Human Persons”

non-human persons

Are we moving beyond the human/animal binary? Via Environment News Service:

India’s Ministry of Environment and Forests has decided to forbid the keeping of captive dolphins for public entertainment anywhere in the country. In a policy statement released Friday, the ministry said:

“[Their] unusually high intelligence as compared to other animals means that dolphin should be seen as ‘non-human persons’ and as such should have their own specific rights and is morally unacceptable to keep them captive for entertainment purpose.”

The grassroots Federation of Indian Animal Protection Organization, FIAPO, was pleased with the decision. FIAPO spokesperson Puja Mitra called the decision “a huge victory for the dolphins!”

Ric O’Barry, director of the U.S.-based Earth Island Institute’s Dolphin Project, said, “Not only has the Indian government spoken out against cruelty, they have contributed to an emerging and vital dialogue about the ways we think about dolphins – as thinking, feeling beings.”

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Sonia Gandhi’s “Occult” Economics

Picture: Ricardo Stuckert (CC)

Surjit S. Bhalla writes at the India Express:

As we all know, an economic disaster has struck India for the last three years. A halving of GDP growth, a doubling of inflation rates, a 20 per cent depreciation of the rupee, and record current account deficits (latest, 6.7 per cent of GDP) are reflective of the deep rot the Indian economy is in.

The economy numbers are exceptionally bad and worse than most other countries. What, or who, is responsible for making the impossible possible? For sure, it is the Congress-led UPA government. But who within the Congress party? On economic issues, most fingers will point towards the prime minister, Manmohan Singh, an economist of international repute, and joint father of the economic reforms introduced under the leadership of non-Nehru-Gandhi Congressman Narasimha Rao in 1991. But this would be wrong.

For too long we have been made to believe that, within the UPA, the political decisions were made by Sonia and the economic decisions by Singh.

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Most Inappropriate Ad of the Year?

Ford’s India subsidiary is targeting a unique demographic: serial killers.

A new series of magazine ads from the automaker highlights the cavernous trunk space in the new Figo hatchback by showing a trio of bound and gagged young women stuffed inside. Autoblog notes that,

Clearly in bad taste, at least, the Indian source also questions the timing of these risqué Ford ads, as they follow by days new anti-rape legislation passed by the Indian Parliament.

Apparently the Figo isn’t just unsafe for the women trapped in the vehicle’s trunk, though. According to Indian car rating website carsingh.com, the export-model hatchback doesn’t come equipped with standard airbags so it may be a death-defying ride for anyone … whether they’re traveling in it willingly or otherwise.

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Hitler and Frankenstein Running for Office in India

Subir Bhaumik writes at Al Jazeerra:

In a small, hilly state tucked away in India’s remote northeast, Hitler is out to try his luck at politics. So is Frankenstein.

Meghalaya, a predominantly Christian state, will vote for its 60-member state assembly on February 23. Three hundred and forty-five candidates representing several national and regional groupings are in the fray.

One of them is Adolf lu Hitler R Marak, contesting the Bajengdoba constituency in the Garo Hills area.

He has been active in Meghalaya politics for a while, even serving as a minister for a brief spell, before he lost the elections in 2003 to Zenith Sangma.

Five years later, Hitler defeated Zenith to return to the state assembly. And Hitler has had some strangely named company in the state assembly.

Candidates with names like Churchill, Roosevelt and Chamberlain won elections and became members of the Meghalaya state assembly in past years.

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UFOs Sighted Above World’s Largest Oil Refinery In India

Authorities are alarmed by reports and photos of mysterious lights, the Indian Express reports:

One evening a little over a fortnight ago, a mysterious illuminated object appeared without warning in the dark sky above the world’s largest oil refinery in Jamnagar, Gujarat. It circled over the complex before disappearing just as suddenly as it had appeared.

Three days later, the object returned. This time, the process cameras at the Reliance Industries Ltd refinery managed to take a few pictures of the object. It was bright and spherical. RIL has reported the sightings to the government. The Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard have been put on alert, and the defense ministry is beefing up security for the refinery, sources said.

RIL executive director P.M.S. Prasad wrote to Petroleum Minister M. Veerappa Moily: “One unidentified bright object, perceived to be of the size of a volleyball, was seen hovering. It was seen to circle four times before disappearing.”

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