Tag Archives | Insects

Male insect roars like a lion while walking on leaf

“Two types of mirid bug engage in roaring duels, possibly to establish dominance or attract females, but how they make the noise is unknown.”

via New Scientist:

They are rather diminutive to be kings of the jungle, but two species of mirid bug make sounds similar to the roars of big cats. These calls have never before been heard in insects, and we’re not sure why, or how, the insects produce the eerie calls.

The roars are too weak to be heard by humans without a bit of help. But Valerio Mazzoni of the Edmund Mach Foundation in Italy and his team made them audible by amplifying them using a device called a laser vibrometer. The device detects the minute vibrations that the bugs produce on the leaves on which they live.

“When you listen to these sounds through headphones you’d think you were next to a tiger or lion,” Mazzoni.

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America’s most lethal animal

Animal attacks have been in the news a lot. Late last year, a 22-year-old student in New Jersey was killed by a black bear he had been photographing. This summer, swimmers off the coast of North Carolina have suffered a record number of shark attacks, several of which resulted in amputations. And early in July, a 28-year-old Texas swimmer who ignored warning signs was killed by an alligator.

Of course, not all human-killing animals are so large. Each year, dozens of Americans die due to bites by venomous snakes, lizards and spiders. Other small animals such as ticks and fleas, though not naturally outfitted with their own lethal weaponry, can nonetheless kill by transmitting deadly infections, such as Powassan virus.

Worldwide, the animal responsible for by far the greatest number of human deaths is just such an insect that transmits a deadly infection: the mosquito.… Read the rest

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If You’re a Darwin’s Bark Spider, Eating Pussy Could Save Your Life

spiderWhy am I posting this? Well, because if you follow my writing you’ll recall that I’m always going on about both worshipping the sacred feminine and communicating with extra dimensional forms of insectile hive mind intelligence. We all remember how Terence McKenna’s psilocybin deity came across as a praying mantis and Whitley Strieber’s grey alien master was a super freaky sex spider right? No? Well, I’ll keep reminding you. Anyway, when looking at these things from an Occult perspective, you find that the concept of a culture dominated by a more feminine current is metaphorically fleshed out over and over in the insect kingdom. This is but another fun example (from New Scientist):

“Darwin’s bark spiders are a rather enigmatic species, but even we were in for a surprise when we observed their peculiar courtship behaviour,” says Kralj-Fiser.

The team observed that females mate with multiple males, and that males are ultra-competitive as a result.… Read the rest

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Which Life Form Dominates Earth?

Springtails can be smaller than a pinhead (Credit: Sinclair Stammers / NPL)

Springtails can be smaller than a pinhead (Credit: Sinclair Stammers / NPL)

Nic Fleming Via BBC:

We humans tend to assume we rule the Earth. With our advanced tool making, language, problem solving and social skills, and our top predator status, we like to think of ourselves as the dominant life form on the planet.

But are we?

There are organisms that are significantly more numerous, cover more of the Earth’s surface and make up more of its living biomass than us. We are certainly having major impacts in most corners of the globe and on its other inhabitants.

But are there are other living things that are quietly having greater, more significant influences? Who or what is really in charge?

If world domination is a numbers game, few can compare with tiny six-legged, shrimp-like springtails, or Collembola. Ranging from 0.25-10mm in length, there are typically around 10,000 per square metre of soil, rising to as many as 200,000 per square metre in some places.

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100-Million-Year-Old Predatory Cockroach Found in Amber

Manipulator modificaputis gen. et sp. n. (Manipulatoridae fam.n.) holotype SMNS Bu-116 (deposited in the Stuttgart Museum of Natural History) from the Cretaceous Myanmar amber. A – left view, B – dorsal view, C – detail on the forewing articulation, D – forewing surface hexagonal structure. Scales 0.5 mm. Photo credit: Geologica Carphatica

Manipulator modificaputis gen. et sp. n. (Manipulatoridae fam.n.) holotype SMNS Bu-116 (deposited in the Stuttgart Museum of Natural History) from the Cretaceous Myanmar amber.
A – left view
B – dorsal view
C – detail on the forewing articulation
D – forewing surface hexagonal structure. Scales 0.5 mm.
Photo credit: Geologica Carphatica

It’s the stuff of nightmares: a predatory cockroach (which hunted at night, of course) was recently found preserved in amber. The cockroach and its kin coexisted with dinosaurs and was found near a mine in Noije Bum, Myanmar.

This predator bears a striking resemblance to a praying-mantis. Scientists, Peter Vršanský from the Geological Institute in Bratislava, Slovakia, and Günter Bechly from the State Museum of Natural History in Stuttgart, Germany, say that its long legs and and long neck indicate that these critters were adept hunters.

“The specimen is one of dozens of preserved insects found in the area, making it the most important site of dinosaur-age amber in the world,” says Vršanský.… Read the rest

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Meet The Asian Giant Hornet. Soon.

PIC: Mgigantius (CC)

PIC: Mgigantius (CC)

Warmer weather and international trade are introducing these thumb-sized hornets to new habitats around the globe. They’re already in Europe. Next stop? Maybe a shrub or old tree stump near your home!

In recent years, Vespa m. populations have exploded in parts of China, where 42 people died and more than 1,600 were injured from hornet attacks in 2013, alone.

Attracted by human sweat, and disturbed by human activity (particularly running), the hornets vigorously defend their territory, chasing people up to 600 feet and stinging them multiple times with their very toxic venom that can cause: “Anaphylactic shock and renal failure. One of the victims . . . said she has spent two months in a hospital undergoing 13 dialysis treatments. . . . She has 200 stiches, but still cannot move her legs. She told . . . a news agency . . . ‘They hit right at my head and covered my legs.

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The Food Of The Future? UN Report Spurs Growth Of Insect Farms

Teleogryllus_oceanicus_female

PIC: Rymiduff (CC)

Who wants seconds?

I keep a reptile that eats crickets, so I’m forced to house them on my property. There’s nothing more foul than those things. Enjoy your bugs, Ohioans.

A TWITCHING mass of European house crickets clings to a maze of meshed cardboard in a tent about the size of a minivan. They are inside their new home, an abandoned warehouse in Youngstown, Ohio, where they will prosper until being killed, ground into “flour” and baked into cookies and tortilla chips.

These are the first insects in the US to be farmed for human consumption. Big Cricket Farms, the company running the warehouse, is working with insect food start-up Six Foods in Boston, who will make the cricket chips (pictured right) – which they call “chirps” – and cookies. They are among many adventurous eaters hoping to carve out a niche for a protein-rich, environmentally friendly food source that could transform the modern diet.

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Giant Hornets Kill 42 People In China

giant hornets

The New York Times reports:

Swarms of giant hornets have killed 42 people in Shaanxi Province and injured more than 1,600 in recent months, according to Xinhua, the official news agency. Government officials have yet to figure out why their attacks have been so widespread and deadly.

Officials said on Thursday that emergency response teams were working to locate and destroy the nests of Asian giant hornets, the species involved in the attacks. Their venom is highly toxic and can cause shock and renal failure.

Hornet attacks have been reported elsewhere in China as well. Last month, a swarm attacked a primary school in the Guangxi Autonomous Region in southern China, injuring 30 people, including 23 children.

Up to two inches long, the brown and gold Asian giant, or Vespa mandarinia, is the world’s largest hornet species.

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Crop Circle Pre-Cog Dude Chillaxes with the Grasshopper People

grasshopperpeopleI must confess that as much as I read about things like crop circles and U.F.O.’s in my youth, I haven’t honestly kept tabs on much of it for the last decade. I suppose I just sort of hit a wall, or moreover, the whole thing strikes me like a plea from deep within us to explore genetics and psi phenomenon rather than our current consumerist/materialist obsessions, which are obviously a dead end. I’ve never read a single report about an abductee who claims that the “aliens” (don’t buy the extra-terrestrial hypothesis at all) gave any sort of flying fuck about all the fancy technology we’re so impressed with.

Anywho, this is the sort of story I always found the most fascinating in U.F.O. lore (recommended to me on Facebook, friend me) – the bizarro outlying stories which hint at the limitless potentiality of the human imagination. Like the guy from Holland who predicts crop circles in advance and hangs out with hilarious grasshopper people, who for some reason are quite fond of turtlenecks:

 

The awareness that a new crop circle is either forming (or is about to) at the precise moment Dutch medium Robbert van den Broeke “sees” in his “mind’s eye” either the pattern of the new crop circle and/or the exact field where it will be found has been carefully recorded every year since he was 15 years old (he is now 32).… Read the rest

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Billions of Cicadas About to Overrun U.S. East Coast

I have visions of African locust swarms, but apparently being outnumbered 600 to 1 by cicadas shouldn’t worry residents of the East Coast of America as all these insects are looking for is sex. From AP via Black Mountain News:

Any day now, billions of cicadas with bulging red eyes will crawl out of the earth after 17 years underground and overrun the East Coast. The insects will arrive in such numbers that people from North Carolina to Connecticut will be outnumbered roughly 600-to-1. Maybe more.

Scientists even have a horror-movie name for the infestation: Brood II. But as ominous as that sounds, the insects are harmless. They won’t hurt you or other animals. At worst, they might damage a few saplings or young shrubs. Mostly they will blanket certain pockets of the region, though lots of people won’t ever see them.

“It’s not like these hordes of cicadas suck blood or zombify people,” says May Berenbaum, a University of Illinois entomologist.

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