Tag Archives | Internet

Air France Executives Attacked as Carrier Cuts 2,900 Jobs

Airbus | A380-861 | Air France | F-HPJJ | Hong Kong | HKG | VHHH
Mathieu Rosemain via Bloomberg:

Air France executives were forced to flee with their clothes in tatters after workers stormed a meeting at Charles de Gaulle airport in protest at 2,900 planned job cuts.

Human resources chief Xavier Broseta and Pierre Plissonnier, head of long-haul flights, scaled an eight-foot fence to escape, aided by security guards. Broseta emerged shirtless and Plissonnier had his suit ripped to shreds.

Violence erupted Monday as Air France told its works council that 300 pilots, 900 flight attendants and 1,700 ground staff might have to go after failed productivity talks with flight crew. The protest, in which agitators chanted “naked, naked,” is just the latest to turn physical in France, where managers at Michelin & Cie. and Sony Corp. have been held hostage over firings, irate farmers have blocked city streets with tractors and manure and more than 100 Uber Technologies Inc. taxis have been smashed up by rival drivers.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Study: 11% of Americans Think HTML Is an STD

This blows my mind. Back in 2014, a study from VoucherCloud which was published in the LA Times found that about 11% of people thought HTML was an STD. They also found that 23% of people thought MP3 was a Star Wars reboot.

I really hope the numbers have started to decrease.

Jessica Roy via TIME:

Had a particularly raucous night that ended with you doing the walk of shame the next morning? Uh oh, hope you don’t get HTML. Just kidding! HTML is a programming language that’s used to make websites, but according to a new study from VoucherCloudand published by the L.A. Times, 1 in every 9 Americans–or exactly 11%–think HTML is actually a sexually transmitted disease. VoucherCloud surveyed 2,392 people ages 18 or older and, according to theL.A. Times, “were given both tech and non-tech terms and were asked to choose from three possible definitions.” The results?

Read the rest
Continue Reading

‘Citizen Kane’ to ‘Call of Duty’: The rise of video games in universities


Dead Bug Creek, Ashley Pinnick’s final project

Jessica Conditt via engadget:

Picture an art school. Visualize the hallways of a university dedicated to the arts, the classrooms lined with paint tubes, charcoal sticks and nude models. Imagine the galleries where outgoing seniors present their final projects. Consider the thick-framed glasses that sit atop students’ noses as they sketch, sculpt, write and design the things that lurk in their wildest daydreams. Now picture a creation so strange that the school’s professors aren’t sure how to critique it from an artistic angle, let alone how to assign it a grade.

In Pasadena, California, Art Center College of Design graduate Ashley Pinnick faced this problem in her last semester, with her final project: a video game.

Specifically, Pinnick’s project was a quirky exploration game for Oculus’ VR headset called Dead Bug Creek. It was wildly different from her peers’ creations in the Illustration degree program, but not because it was more experimental or nonsensical: It was the only video game on display because Art Center didn’t have a technical video game development program.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

If Women Ruled the World – Is a Matriarchal Society the Solution?

woman to woman
Steve Taylor, Ph.D, via Waking Times:

Is a matriarchal society the solution to our problems?

I’ve just returned from Crete, where I visited the ancient palace of Knossos, and the archaeological museum in Heraklion, where thousands of the artifacts and artworks of ancient Crete are displayed.

The most striking thing about the culture of ancient Crete (or Minoan culture, as it is often called) is how prominent women are. They are everywhere in Minoan artwork, on pottery, frescoes and figurines (small stone statues). They are shown as priestesses, goddesses, dancing and talking at social occasions, in beautiful dresses with their breasts on show. There is a striking fresco of a beautifully dressed woman surrounded by a group of half-naked dancing men.

It is clear that – as many archaeologists have agreed – this was a society in which women had very high status; at least as high as men.

Some archaeologists believe that the Minoans worshiped a goddess, and that women were the main religious leaders.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Time Travel & The Multiverse – Many Worlds: Many Timelines


Marie D. Jones & Larry Flaxman – New Dawn via Waking Times:

Time travel has enchanted and intrigued us since the earliest days of fiction, when authors such as H.G. Wells, Samuel Madden, Charles Dickens and Enrique Gaspar y Rimbau stretched and challenged our imaginations with images and tales of men and women who invented amazing machines and devices that could take them back in time, or forward into the future. Because of the restrictions of light speed, and the paradoxes of going back to the past without damaging the future timeline, and a host of other obstacles and challenges, we, in fact, have remained stuck in the present.

Our scientific knowledge and technological achievement has yet to catch up to the limitless dreams of our imaginations. But perhaps just because we have yet to achieve time travel in our universe, in our particular point along the cosmic arrow of time, doesn’t mean it isn’t achievable… and maybe the key is the universe itself.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

20 Terrible Scientists in TV and Film


Louisa Walker via Den of Geek:

Indiana Jones is a great movie character, but a terrible scientist. Here are 19 more for your consideration…

Scientists can get a bad rap in films and TV. As Sheldon from The Big Bang Theory utters “it’s amazing how many supervillains have advanced degrees.” They are often the source of a lot of the troubles that the heroes face, either through lab accidents or a slight megalomania problem. As science is being increasingly used in films to explain strange goings-on, I thought it worth looking for the examples of scientists in films who give our job a bad name.

So, some ground rules first.

The definition of “worst” in this list can relate to simply being bad at science. However, there is an inherent understanding in the world of science that your work should be conducted to an ethical code. Science in general is geared towards helping people or improving the world, through things such as finding ways to cure diseases or developing technology to make people’s lives easier.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

What I learned about the Internet after 25 years in prison

Old computer / New computer
Michael Santos was incarcerated from August 11, 1987 to August 13, 2012 for his role in the distribution of cocaine. While in prison he made a personal three-part plan:

1. I would work to educate myself,
2. I would work to contribute to society, and
3. I would work to build a support network that would have a vested interest in my success upon release.

He now spends his time writing about his knowledge of the federal prison system. Here’s his latest essay at Kernel Magazine, “What I learned about the Internet after 25 years in prison.”

The Internet did not exist when I began serving my prison sentence in 1987. I didn’t have direct access to the Internet as it became mainstream for many Americans through the “You’ve got mail!” craze of the ’90s. Years would pass, until my release from prison in 2012, before I’d be able to experience the Internet firsthand.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

The CIA and the Media: 50 Facts the World Needs to Know

CIA Logo

Prof. James F. Tracy via Global Research:

Since the end of World War Two the Central Intelligence Agency has been a major force in US and foreign news media, exerting considerable influence over what the public sees, hears and reads on a regular basis. CIA publicists and journalists alike will assert they have few, if any, relationships, yet the seldom acknowledged history of their intimate collaboration indicates a far different story–indeed, one that media historians are reluctant to examine.

When seriously practiced, the journalistic profession involves gathering information concerning individuals, locales, events, and issues. In theory such information informs people about their world, thereby strengthening “democracy.” This is exactly the reason why news organizations and individual journalists are tapped as assets by intelligence agencies and, as the experiences of German journalist Udo Ulfkotte (entry 47 below) suggest, this practice is at least as widespread today as it was at the height of the Cold War.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Mutually Agreed Peace: Ending The Doctrine of Perpetual War

Peace-a-Chance-NukeEthan Indigo Smith via Waking Times:

“Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn’t mean politics won’t take an interest in you.” ~ Pericles

Everything is ultimately political these days, but everything is firstly biological. Yet, ignoring our biology and our humanity, the military-industrial complex, with all its toxic modalities, still claims to operate in our best interests.

The fact is, modern politics has become the imposition of institutional formality where individuals and truth once were. Increasingly favoring institutional privilege over individual rights, politicians on all sides of the game act to reinforce and advance the standing of corporations at the expense of our physical world. They embark on resource wars for profit, destroy our environment for energy, construe zealotry as patriotism, and steer a culture of social competition – not cooperation – all the while hiding behind veils of secrecy and meaningless rhetoric.

It does not matter what caste you were born into, whether you are wealthy or poor, victor or victim of the system; as far as the big picture goes, we live in a world where commerce, politics and war are dominant and inseparable forces.

Read the rest
Continue Reading