Tag Archives | interview

William Gibson interview: time travel, virtual reality, and his new book

William Gibson (CC by-sa 2.0)

William Gibson (CC by-sa 2.0)

via The Verge:

Our geography is dissolving into the digital.

Science fiction author William Gibson’s work, from cyberpunk classic Neuromancer to his more recent, less overtly futuristic novels, is usually more concerned with smart cultural analysis than plotting the mechanics of new technology. Gibson has given us a lens to see everything from high fashion to virtual reality, coining the term “cyberspace” to refer to what would soon become a ubiquitous computer network in the real world (“And they won’t let me forget it,” he quipped after being introduced with that factoid in the TV show Wild Palms.)

But time travel is one of the most mechanical genres around — not necessarily in scientific rationale, but in the rigorous attempt to fit together pieces of the past, present, and future without leaving loose ends or, at worst, unresolved paradoxes. And Gibson’s latest novel, The Peripheral, fits at least a few of its tropes.

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Noam Chomsky on Education and Indoctrination

By Kris Arnold via Flickr (cc by 2.0)

By Kris Arnold via Flickr (cc by 2.0)

via AlterNet [Click through to read the entire interview]:

History teacher Dan Falcone and English teacher Saul Isaacson spoke with Noam Chomsky in his Cambridge office on September 16, 2014, about education and indoctrination, the 1960s, the Powell memorandum, democracy, the creation of ISIS, the media and the way “capitalism” actually works in the United States.

Dan Falcone: We’re in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with Professor Noam Chomsky. I am Dan Falcone with Saul Isaacson, and this is actually the third time I’ve visited you. So I wanted to thank you for that. And since I am a teacher, I wanted to start off by continuing on the themes of democracy and education.

I have noticed students making very insightful and uplifting observations in the midst of chaos. For example, they noticed that support for Israel fell out of favor in certain mainstream circles, and that the recent police treatment of unarmed black teenagers in intensifying areas of violence is a crucial matter of concern.

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David Cronenberg: Why Frustrated Novelists Hate the Screenplay

"David Cronenberg at BMC Lab in TIFF Bell Lightbox" by Canadian Film Centre via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

“David Cronenberg at BMC Lab in TIFF Bell Lightbox” by Canadian Film Centre via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

via The Daily Beast [click through to read the entire interview]:

“I couldn’t have written this novel without the Internet,” the film director David Cronenberg says about Consumed, sounding like one of the obsessed characters lifted from its pages.

Published late last month by Scribner, the book details the bifurcated narratives of a romantically and technologically linked journalist couple, one chasing the story of the grisly and cannibalistic murder involving a famous French philosophy couple and their acolytes, the other a relationship between the doctor behind a mysterious sexually transmitted disease and his strange daughter. In between, the novel features many detours: the Cannes Film Festival, 3-D printing, hooked penises, and transmissions from the “insect kingdom” through fake hearing aids. It’s the most Cronenbergian thing you’ll ever experience, and a little awkward to read on the subway.

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Chomsky: U.S. Spawned a Fundamentalist Frankenstein in the Mideast

Young Frankenstein by Insomnia Cured Here via Flickr.

Young Frankenstein by Insomnia Cured Here via Flickr.

via Alternet (originally on TruthOut):

For decades now, Noam Chomsky has been widely regarded as the most important intellectual alive (linguist, philosopher, social and political critic) and the leading US dissident since the Vietnam War. Chomsky has published over 100 books and thousands of articles and essays, and is the recipient of dozens of honorary doctorate degrees by some of the world’s greatest academic institutions. His latest book, Masters of Mankind: Essays and Lectures, 1969-2013, has just been published by Haymarket Books. On the occasion of the release of his last book, Chomsky gave an exclusive and wide-ranging interview to C.J. Polychroniou for Truthout, parts of which will also appear in The Sunday Eleftherotypia, a major national Greek newspaper.

C.J. Polychroniou: In a nationally televised address on the eve of the 13th anniversary of the September 11th attacks on the United States, Obama announced to the American people and the rest of the world that the United States is going back to war in Iraq, this time against the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

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From Twin Peaks to GMOs: An Interview with Artist Jordan Hourie

Dysmorphia

Dysmorphia

I had the pleasure of interviewing Jordan Hourie, a 21-year-old illustration student at the Savannah College of Art and Design. I first came across her work on the Twin Peaks subreddit, where she shared a piece of fan art. After perusing her website, I decided to ask her for an interview.

MG: So why don’t you tell me a little bit of your background to get started. How did you get started with digital painting? What has your progression been?

Well I came to university and didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I tried doing sequential art (comic books) but it turns out that I like reading them a lot more than making them. I ended up in the illustration department because I knew I wanted to draw. The major was vague enough for me to feel comfortable figuring out what I wanted to do. I had never drawn or painted digitally before last fall which is when I took an electronic art class.… Read the rest

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Entheodelic Storytelling: A Conversation with Gabriel D. Roberts

Quest For GnosisPAPERI recently had the distinct pleasure of catching up with my good friend Gabriel D. Roberts, author of The Quest for Gnosis. He is making his first foray into fiction very soon with a new book called The Hermit.

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BR: Gabe, one of the things I like so much about the way you deliver ideas is that it is both honest and raw while also “getting to the heart of things” in a very rapid manner. What were some of the initial things that inspired The Quest for Gnosis?

I wanted to make a fast track for the serious seeker who was tired of the dogmatic mire of big religion and I knew that I alone would fall short of delivering such a tome. It made sense to employ the minds of those very people who shaped and influenced my perspectives. This is a refinement of my own journey that I hope will make it easier for the neophyte to grow.… Read the rest

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David Cronenberg: ‘My imagination is not a place of horror’

David Cronenberg, Genie Awards 2012 by Alan Langford via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

David Cronenberg, Genie Awards 2012 by Alan Langford via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

Cronenberg compares himself to Gergor Samsa? I like him even more.

via The Guardian (Follow the link to read the entire interview):

When the great Canadian film-maker David Cronenberg turned 70 last year he felt, in a word, old. An admirer of Franz Kafka, he said he found himself comparing himself to Gregor Samsa, the protagonist of The Metamorphosis, who wakes up one morning to find – very Cronenbergian – that he’s become a giant beetle.

“You are a new creature,” Cronenberg explains. “Ask anybody who is not advanced in years what they think of 70-year-olds – if they think of them at all – and it’s Alzheimer’s, senile old people and Zimmer frames. Just, ‘Wow, what a burden on the healthcare system.’ Three score and ten, that’s supposed to be it, that’s the biblical age. So there are precedents for considering 70 to be a major moment in your life.”

Once he had come to terms with the shock, though, Cronenberg returned to his work with renewed vigour.

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Interview: John Waters on his “exploitation films for art theaters”

Waters at Pen America/Free Expression Literature, May 2014. © Ed Lederman/PEN American Center via Wikimedia Commons

Waters at Pen America/Free Expression Literature, May 2014.
© Ed Lederman/PEN American Center via Wikimedia Commons

The Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York City is hosting a retrospective of John Waters’ films beginning this week. They are also showcasing “John Waters Presents: ‘Movies I’m Jealous I Didn’t Make‘”:

Here they are—eight extreme, astoundingly perverse, darkly funny, and, most importantly, supremely surprising films that turn me green with envy. Every day I feel inadequate thinking of these fanatically obsessive, ludicrously sexual, unfathomably criminal, melodramatically misguided cinematic gems. Why oh why can’t I make films like these—ones that jolted me out of all cinematic lethargy? Exploitation, art, horror? There’s no such thing as genre when you’ve slipped to the other side of cinema-sanity. See for yourself the movies that drove me beyond the pale of normal movie madness. Jealousy over other directors’ careers is a terrible thing to waste. — John Waters

The series includes CrashFinal DestinationBefore I ForgetKiller JoeThe MotherNight GamesOf Unknown Origin, and Thérèse.… Read the rest

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