Tag Archives | Interviews

Interview with David Lynch – Transcendental Meditation, “True Detective,” and More

"David Lynch (cropped edit)" by Sasha Kargaltsev - http://www.flickr.com/photos/kargaltsev/3603597312/. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

“David Lynch (cropped edit)” by Sasha Kargaltsev. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

The Daily Beast just ran an awesome interview with David Lynch. I’ve pulled some snippets here, but you should read the whole thing if you’re a Lynch fan!

via The Daily Beast:

I just saw your fantastic ALS Ice Bucket Challenge video.

[Laughs] Oh. Great trumpet playing, huh? I had to do two buckets because two people challenged me, so I thought it should have some music to it. And I’m agreat trumpet player. And for some reason, I wanted to nominate Vladimir Putin. He might want to take part in helping some people.

Were there some demons you were dealing with when you turned to TM? You started on Eraserhead in ’72, and I understand that was a very fraught production early on.

You don’t have to be in bad shape.

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Harmony Korine Interviews Kenneth Anger

Picture of Harmony Korine via Creative Commons.

Picture of Harmony Korine via Creative Commons.

Sorry about having two Harmony Korine posts in one day, but I couldn’t wait to share this one. In the interview, Kenneth Anger touches upon his beliefs in Thelema, his filmmaking style, the missing Malaysian plane, and more.

via Interview Magazine:

To describe Kenneth Anger as a “cult filmmaker” seems requisite but incomplete. The 87-year-old native Angeleno is indeed the writer and director of the surrealist shortsInauguration of the Pleasure Dome (1954-66), Scorpio Rising (1963), and Lucifer Rising (1970-81)—some of the wildest and most profoundly influential experimental films of the last century. But his salacious narrative history of the industry, Hollywood Babylon, originally published in 1960, is also kitsch-famous, a kind of gossip gospel in the land of holy celebrity. His film and video works are in the permanent collections of various museums of modern art. And he is also the most famous living practitioner of Thelema—the ritual-based doctrine dictated to Aleister Crowley by the spiritual messenger Aiwass.

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The Delightful Art of the Macabre: An Interview With Gigi DeLuxe and Ugly Shyla

(L) Gigi Deluxe (R) Ugly Shyla. Gigi pic (c). Ugly Shyla Pic courtesy of Alas Vera.

(L) Gigi DeLuxe (R) Ugly Shyla. Gigi pic courtesy of the artist (c). Ugly Shyla Pic courtesy of Alas Vera (c).

Gigi Deluxe and Ugly Shyla made names for themselves as artists who give us a glimpse into the macabre and delightfully dark corners of art. Their work grants us a perspective into subject matter that is often imitated, never replicated. Gigi DeLuxe lives in Chicago, where she is a tattoo artist, painter and jeweler. Ugly Shyla originally hails from Louisiana and has now moved to Austin, Texas, where she continues to craft dolls and jewelry.

Aonie Anfa: What is your personal mission statement or mantra as an artist? Both of you work in the realm of the occult or traffic in the delightfully strange. What recurring themes or images present themselves in your work and how do those subjects resonate with you personally?

Gigi DeLuxe: I don’t have a personal mission statement or mantra but I do have a favorite quote from Gustave Flaubert that I set as an ideal goal for my daily life.… Read the rest

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DragonCon 2013 Exclusive: The Transmedia of Tomorrow

Exclusive: DragonCon 2013 – The Transmedia of Tomorrow: The Art That Lies To Tell The Truth

01-dragonconlogoFiction and non-fiction, fact and myth, often aren’t opposites.

These lines blend a little more every day. When these things play such a crucial role in our news as well as entertainment media, and in a world where social media platforms are often at the front lines of cultural revolutions, it is increasingly necessary that these things are understood. Join us for a discussion on this topic, along with links to a variety of articles that expand upon and support the limited amount that can be discussed in a 45 minute panel.

This three person panel is a truncated transcript of the initial Dragon*Con discussion, moderated by David Metcalfe. The other two participants were transmedia artist James Curcio and Damien Williams, who you may have caught at one of many other panels at Dragon*Con this year including “How To Be a Comics Scholar,” “Devouring Selfhood: Zombies In Narrative,” “Gender, Race, and Identities in Comics,” and many others.Read the rest

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Interview with Zero and Suicide Squad Writer Ales Kot

Panels from Suicide Squad issue 21

Ales Kot writes comics, amongst other things. His first graphic novel, Wild Children with Riley Rossmo, was published by Image Comics last year. He quickly followed this with Change with Morgan Jeske, also at Image. The “>collected edition was just released by Image last week.

Now he’s writing the superhero series Suicide Squad for DC and his creator owned espionage comic Zero for Image.

I just interviewed him at Technoccult:

Wild Children deals with the education system, you’ve said that Zero is about war and Suicide Squad obviously deals with the prison system. It seems that institutions and the way they affect people is emerging as a major theme in your work. Is that deliberate?

That is an intelligent observation, thank you. The narrative thread you just traced between my works was subconscious more than conscious on a story-to-story level. I am consciously interested in how institutions we create affect our life; institutions that are official and the ones that are hidden deeper within the fabric of our lives, the ones we create within our society and within our heads, sometimes without giving them names or without even realizing their presence.

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Arm Cannons and Futurism, an Interview With the Creators of Light Years Away

Light Years Away comic

Via Technoccult:

After a while, most serialized webcomics start to look the same. Just about every series seems to strike a similar balance of influences from anime and western animation. But not Light Years Away, which draws inspiration from European sci-fi comics by artists like Moebius and Tanino Liberatore.

LYA is set in a world where many — perhaps most — people have cybernetic implants. But there’s a growing, violent anti-implant movement called the Puritans. The first story arc, Escape from Prison Planet, tells the story of Milo, a repeat offender doing time on an off-planet penal colony, where he ends up in the middle of a prison gang war between the Puritans and the implantees. Soon, however, he finds out there’s something bigger going on.

I talked with writer Ethan Ede and artist Adam Rosenlund — the Boise, Idaho based duo behind the series — about webcomics, the future of the series and other projects they have in the hopper.

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An Interview With An Otherkin

legolasWriter Danny Smith shares this interview he conducted with an “otherkin”. I couldn’t help but to notice that the ‘kin states that he worships Corellon, God of the Elves – a deity created for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. Seems like an odd choice, but I suppose if you’re having “flashbacks” of a past-life battle with orcs and describe your “real” self as looking suspiciously like Orlando Bloom’s portrayal of Legolas in Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings,  it stands to say that anything goes. I suppose we all build a personal mythology during the course of our lives, and believing that you’re an elf trapped in a human’s body is no more or less ridiculous than anything else offered by the world’s major religions.

What are Otherkin?

The Otherkin are human-bodied individuals who feel themselves to be, in an essential sense, non-human. Their Innate Species Persona (ISP) might be a mundane, familiar animal, such as a wolf, a cat, or penguin – even a highly unfamiliar being like an elf/faerye, demon, or angel not recognised as having even existed by narrow-minded scientists like Stephen Hawkins.

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Interview Pending: Got Any Questions for Russell Targ?

reality of espThe next episode of the DisinfoCast will feature “remote viewing” researcher and physicist Russell Targ.

We’ll be discussing his book The Reality of ESP, among other matters. If our Disinfonauts have any questions for Targ then I’d be happy to pose as many as I can to him. Leave your questions in the comments section below. Disclaimer: I can’t guarantee I’ll be able to use all of your questions.

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A Question of Art, Aesthetic, and a Body of Work

From an interview with The Dharma of Don, talking with fellow indie author and artist Curcio about the ins and outs of writing, publishing, collaborative artwork and art collectives, and everything in-between!

Don: The Words of Traitors is published under Mythos Media which is your imprint, if I am not mistaken. What other houses have you published under, and have you succeeded with Mythos Media where you felt you struggled with branding under your own name?

James: My first book was released through New Falcon Press, who published Timothy Leary, Robert Anton Wilson, Aleister Crowley, Israel Regardi — it was because of them I think that I got branded an “occult author” although that isn’t really entirely accurate. I’ve worked on several books since then that have been released by Weaponized, which is a UK based imprint.

You will see most of those books also on the Mythos Media website.… Read the rest

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David Byrne’s Multiple-Personality Interview Of Himself

In this media moment lost in the archives of history, Talking Heads front man and weirdo David Byrne organized an interview regarding his band, creative ambitions, and innermost desires. The idea was to adhere to a format "like 60 Minutes on acid", with the questions being asked by female David Byrne, elderly David Byrne, lounge lizard David Byrne, and other disturbing characters:
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