Tag Archives | Jimmy Carter

Former President Jimmy Carter Uses Snail Mail to Thwart NSA Spies

PIC: NARA (PD)

PIC: NARA (PD)

During a recent appearance on Meet the Press, President Jimmy Carter prefers snail mail over email when it comes to sensitive communications with foreign leaders because he suspects the NSA monitors his email. Perhaps he’s right, but what makes him think that Washington’s spooks won’t intercept and steam open his physical correspondence, too?

Via Slate:

Because of privacy concerns, former President Jimmy Carter has returned to snail mail to avoid surveillance. Carter told NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday that he thinks the NSA may be monitoring his email.

“I have felt that my own communications were probably monitored,” he said. “And when I want to communicate with a foreign leader privately, I type or write the letter myself, put it in the post office and mail it. … I believe if I sent an email, it will be monitored.”

Carter said in the interview that he thought the government has “abused our own intelligence agencies.”

Read the rest at Slate or watch the video after the jump.

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Jimmy Carter: End the Global War on Drugs

DEA AgentsI doubt any other former (or current) president(s) will make this statement. Jimmy Carter writes in the New York Times:

In an extraordinary new initiative announced earlier this month, the Global Commission on Drug Policy has made some courageous and profoundly important recommendations in a report on how to bring more effective control over the illicit drug trade. The commission includes the former presidents or prime ministers of five countries, a former secretary general of the United Nations, human rights leaders, and business and government leaders, including Richard Branson, George P. Shultz and Paul A. Volcker.

The report describes the total failure of the present global antidrug effort, and in particular America’s “war on drugs,” which was declared 40 years ago today. It notes that the global consumption of opiates has increased 34.5 percent, cocaine 27 percent and cannabis 8.5 percent from 1998 to 2008. Its primary recommendations are to substitute treatment for imprisonment for people who use drugs but do no harm to others, and to concentrate more coordinated international effort on combating violent criminal organizations rather than nonviolent, low-level offenders.

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