Tag Archives | John E. Mack

Growing Up with John E. Mack

JOHNMACKShould be noted that the day after I posted my critique of Carl Sagan’s The Demon Haunted World, in which I defended the work of the late Harvard psychiatrist John E. Mack, Aeon magazine posted an interesting article by Alexa Clay about growing up with him as her surrogate step dad:

“But as a kid largely ignorant of grander sociological forces, aliens were only one thing: scary. They had large black eyes and androgynous forms. And they were real — like ghosts and witches and monsters. In daylight, I was sceptical (the good little rationalist), but night-time brought with it a tide of magical thinking. I used to lie in bed and worry that maybe I would be abducted. I would even make supplicating promises of better behaviour in the hope of bartering with these outsiders — ‘I’ll be good, just leave me alone.’ In my secular progressive household, aliens offered a moral disciplining authority, an invisible spectator to police my actions.… Read the rest

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If Religion is No Longer Adequate…What About UFOs?

The media is a'buzz with the Office of the Dali Lama's recent statements regarding organized religion. A FaceBook message posted on September 24th presented the following provocation for fundamentalist and arm chair devotees:
" The reality of the world today is that grounding ethics in religion is no longer adequate."
Nor was it ever so, and Buddhism has long held to this fact in its diverse applications of the simple monikor - If you meet the Buddha on the road, kill him. So let's move past any undue shock over those statements and get straight to the UFOs. In 1992 John E. Mack, the noted Harvard Professor who specialized in abduction experiences, had the opportunity to meet with the Dali Lama and discuss his views on the UFO phenomenon. Central to this is Mack's theory, similar to that of Jacques Vallee, that whatever is behind the UFO phenomena, and specifically abduction experiences, is central to changing our perceptions of reality and the progress of our culture. It is interesting to hear Mack discuss the difference in how the Buddhist world view integrates these experiences, juxtaposed with how the 'Western materialist' mindset faces these anomalous encounters:
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