JP Morgan Chase









In yesterday’s New York Times, William D. Cohan refines what was once a confusing and fringe theory about JP Morgan and HSBC’s involvement in silver market manipulation into a very plausible scenario, tying in the cloak and dagger elements of the story with the currently unfolding class action lawsuits in several states.

Once again, the Xtranormal.com platform is being put to good use to elucidate exactly what’s happening:

Each segment has information that I found useful, especially the fact that there is actually no physical silver left in circulation — nice touch. Part II is here and part III available here.

Part IV is here, and after the creators accidentally deleting the original voices, the bear in the overalls is now sounding strangely like John Lennon.

Another source of information and a more detailed breakdown on basic market manipulation and arbitrage is available here. The site that appears to be the sponsor/creators of the Xtranormal videos silvergoldsilver.blogspot.com is less clear, but has information as well…


Max Keiser, financial analyst and host of RT’s Keiser Report, and Texas radio host Alex Jones are telling their listeners and fans to buy silver. Ostensibly the reason is to destroy the value of the JP Morgan bank. The cynic in me wonders if Alex and Max have an existing position in silver that they’d like to see increase in value. Anyone have any real insight?

According to Keiser, the goal of the “Crash JP Morgan – Buy Silver!” campaign is to force JP Morgan to cover its negative bets…



More shenanigans from our beloved mega-banks, concerning this Facebook contest :

J_P_Morgan

via the NY Times

JPMorgan Chase & Company is coming under fire for the way it conducted an online contest to award millions of dollars to 100 charities.

At least three nonprofit groups — Students for Sensible Drug Policy, the Marijuana Policy Project and an anti-abortion group, Justice for All— say they believe that Chase disqualified them over concerns about associating its name with their missions.

The groups say that until Chase made changes to the contest, they appeared to be among the top 100 vote-getters.

“They never gave us any indication that there was any problem with our organization qualifying,” said Micah Daigle, executive director of Students for Sensible Drug Policy. “Now they’re completely stonewalling me.”

Three days before the contest ended, Chase stopped giving participants access to voting information, and it has not made public the vote tallies of the winners.

“This is a problem of accountability,” said David Lee, executive director of Justice for All. “Simply publish the votes and let us see that the 100 organizations named as winners won.”