Tag Archives | kickstarter

Jodorowsky Gets Kickstarter Green-Light

Jodo Young

Over the weekend, Alejandro Jodorowsky’s recent Kickstarter campaign made its goal of $300,000 and was closing in on $385,000 with three days to go at the time of this posting. It looks to me like it might end up just beyond the $400,000 mark.

My girlfriend and I supported the campaign to make Endless Poetry a reality, and I’ve been posting to the film’s poetry archive via Twitter. I don’t write poetry as often as I do critical writing, songwriting, blogging etc. I usually feel moved to actually practice poetry with more attention in the fall, but this year that didn’t really happen.

I’m really happy that this Jodorowsky archive has popped up as its given me a framework and a set of rules for writing poems and I’ve found it to be completely engaging. People think writer’s block denotes a lack of ideas, but, in fact it’s usually an abundance of ideas that stops the process, and it’s often limits and lacking that finally stoke the fires again.… Read the rest

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Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Endless Poetry

Dinero Poetico

Alejandro Jodorowsky is one of my favorite filmmakers, but that won’t come as a surprise to anyone who follows my posts. I’ve seen all of the master’s films and was particularly excited by last year’s release of both The Dance of Reality and the documentary Jodorowsky’s Dune. The former was Jodo’s most recent feature film and the elegiac tone of the movie felt a bit like a summing up of a life and a career, and a few friends of mine even opined that they thought it would be the great magician’s last illusion.

Not so.

Taking a page from the younger set, Jodo has a new Kickstarter campaign underway to fund his next cinematic project. Here’s the skinny…

After a 23 yearlong absence, the director of cult classics El Topo (1969) and Holy Mountain (1973) made his comeback in film direction in 2013 with The Dance of Reality. The film was based on the first part of Alejandro Jodorowsky’s homonymous autobiographical book, depicting his childhood years in Tocopilla, Chile.Read the rest

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Japanese Media, Psychedelic Yokai, and Graphic Novels

My cinematic graphic novel TRETA-YUGA—the sequel to my breakout success KALI-YUGA—is now live on Kickstarter. In light of this, I thought I’d note the ways in which Eastern lore has profoundly influenced my work in graphic novels.

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From my original article at Reality Sandwich:

The Japanese have always had a distinct way of portraying supernatural encounters with otherworldly beings. The infiltration of J-horror into the stale domain of Hollywood was an early sign of amnesiac Westerners longing to learn of the old ways. Supernatural encounters with the other (often the demonic Yokai), in whatever horrific way they are experienced in media, is seen by the Japanese as a way of gleaning knowledge from forgotten ancestry and learning the delicate threads of fate. It is in these darkly psychedelic, shadow healing encounters with the Gods that mortals are forced to reconsider the meaning of time, matter, and being.

Scholar Noriko T.

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An Interview with Indie Comic Guru David Brown

The 88 intense (and complete!) pages of Chewler has been called “The ultimate indie comic discovery. Bizarre, artistically inventive, visually orgasmic boasting a hilariously comedic story line about drunks, super-computers, aliens and a dead Nazi dictator.”

I mean it has extra dimensional 3rd eye aliens, how can fellow Disinfonauts not be interested?


David as a fellow indie comics creator, I can sympathize with the struggle to get stuff out there that doesn’t have capes, and I love the fact that your new work Chewler is so damn trippy. I’m thrilled that this zany indie comic [now live on Kickstarter] has been receiving all around positive reviews and reception and continues to gain support.

So, my first question is, why comics? Why not a novel or some other medium to tell this story in?

David M. Brown (DB): My background in writing is screenplay which is a lot like writing comics, really.… Read the rest

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‘Beep’, A Documentary About the History of Sound in Video Games

h/t Laughing Squid

“Beep is the definitive documentary film of game sound from the mechanical arcades through to today’s orchestras.”

via Beep‘s Kickstarter page:

We have a really unique opportunity to do this film right now. Nearly all of the people involved in early video games are still alive. We can’t go back and interview early film composers, but we can interview game sound designers and composers from the early days. That opportunity won’t last forever. We need to document this incredible history while we can. We’re going to be keeping all the extra footage that doesn’t make it into the film, and make it available to researchers and fans, so everyone can have access to this important historical information, now and for the future!  We’ve brought on board an archivist and librarian who are going to help us out with archiving and making these recordings available to you.

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‘Reading Rainbow’ the Most Successful Kickstarter Campaign of All Time

reading-rainbowI can still sing the entire Reading Rainbow theme by heart.  Um.. Not right now, though.

As it turns out, there are a lot of people who want LeVar Burton teaching kids how to read. The Reading Rainbow remake has just become the most popular Kickstarter project, ever — it broke the record with over 91,600 backers on June 30th. That puts it ahead of legendary efforts like the OUYA game console, the original Pebble smartwatch and the Veronica Mars movie, and it still has roughly two days left to go as of this writing.

Not that Burton and crew are content with those numbers, mind you. To spur additional pledges, they’re offering new perks that include signed art prints and library visits for the bigger spenders. It’s not certain that Reading Rainbow will reach its next big objective of 100,000 backers, but we wouldn’t rule out a last-minute push that puts it over the top.

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A Campaign To Preserve The Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research Lab As A Museum

 Princeton Engineering Anomalies ResearchPresenting a much-needed Kickstarter to save the Twin Peaks-esque headquarters of the Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research (PEAR) program. PEAR ran fascinating experiments using strange and fantastic devices with the goal of detecting collective consciousness and the physical manifestation of mental projection:
Operated at Princeton University from 1979 to 2007, PEAR is internationally renowned for its studies of human/machine anomalies and the role of consciousness in the construction of physical reality. Its legacy is now being carried forward by International Consciousness Research Laboratories (ICRL), a not-for-profit organization, which will house the proposed museum in its Princeton, NJ, headquarters. Designed to study the potential vulnerability of engineering devices and information processing systems to the anomalous influence of the consciousness of their human operators, machines that will be in this exhibit were based on some form of random physical noise that produced a statistical output distribution, which was automatically recorded on hard copy and in a computer file.
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Five Corporation-Crushing Disruptive Technologies That Will Empower the Masses

disruptive tech headerEveryone knows we are at the mercy of huge corporations in multitude of ways.  Just look at Big Oil.  We are wildly dependent on them as not only individuals, but as a nation and a world.  Though Exxon stands atop the global economic podium, the technology sector isn’t far behind.  Apple made nearly as much in profits in 2012’s fourth quarter as Exxon (a ridiculous $8.2 billion).  Let’s bring that number down to Earth a bit.  Americans are spending an average of $444 per household per year on Apple products alone.  For further evidence, just look around your living room, or better yet, consider the origin of the screen you’re currently staring at.  Chances are, one swollen oligopoly or another made all the pieces of technology you’ve surveyed in the last few seconds.

However, chinks in the armor of these untouchable behemoths are beginning to take shape, leading some, like MIT’s Neil Gershenfeld to question the sustainability of today’s techno giants.… Read the rest

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