Kony 2012

Very compelling read from Jakob Schiller on WIRED’s Raw File below. (Also, worth reading this Washington Post article if you have not come across it): The video calling for a national campaign…



Via Warscapes, Dinaw Mengestu explains that the viral video’s appeal is that “the real star of Kony 2012 isn’t Joseph Kony, it’s us”: Kony 2012 is the most successful example of the…



Clearly, many people of all political stripes are seeing through the hoax put forward by KONY 2012 to legitimize another grand military adventure, now in Africa under AFRICOM.

Rap News Episode 12: YES WE KONY. It’s March, and the Internet delivers 2012′s first globe-consuming meme: the unstoppable, Stop-Kony 2012 video, which has highlighted the plight of African child soldiering like never before. But is it really good? Is it really bad? Or is the world really more complex than ‘good guys’ and ‘bad guys’?…



Nearly 70 million people have watched Kony 2012, but almost none of them have been Ugandans, since internet access in their country is spotty. Thus a charity held a public screening so that actual victims of the civil strife could see the video. The reaction? Extremely negative, as the viewing began with eager anticipation and culminated with people hurling rocks at the screen in disgust over the video’s self-congratulatory nature, its focus on a white American and his young son, and its perceived use of Ugandans as props in a promotional campaign for Invisible Children:


For all the cynicism of this photo-comic, I thought it was hilarious (click image to view or here): _______________________



In response to the KONY 2012 saga, the Awareness 2012 Campaign has been unrolled. No doubt in collaboration with marketing campaigns organized by leading corporations, through social media, it aims to make young people more aware: