Tag Archives | Laugher Yoga

Laugh For Long Life

Lee Berk. Source: Loma Linda Univ.

Lee Berk. Source: Loma Linda Univ.

Anyone who has seen Albert Nerenberg’s film Laughology knows that there are health benefits to laughing as much and as often as possible. Further scientific proof of the merits of Laughter Yoga, Laughtercize and just plain old laughing is reported by Discover Magazine:

Researchers have long known that laughter boosts the immune system, lowers cholesterol and blood pressure, and reduces stress. In a preliminary new study, psychoneuro-immunologist Lee Berk and his team at Loma Linda University in California show that the parallels between laughing and exercise go even further: Shifts in appetite hormones following a case of the giggles resemble the effects of a moderate session at the gym.

Berk measured blood levels of ghrelin, a hunger-regulating hormone, before and after 14 study participants watched 20 minutes of humorous TV (selected from a menu including Saturday Night Live, Bill Cosby’s stand-up, and Seinfeld). He then compared the data with hormone levels recorded before and after the test subjects watched the distressing opening battle scenes of Saving Private Ryan.

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Laughter Yoga Is For Everyone

Free Laugher Yoga in NYC

Free Laugher Yoga in NYC

Next month disinformation is releasing a new film from documentarian Albert Nerenberg, Laughology. It’s the fourth film we’ve distributed for Albert and we have a lot of faith in him, even if we had never heard of Laughter Yoga before.

It turns out it’s massive and the public library next door to our office in New York has free classes, so a few of us went along. If you can get over the embarrassment factor, it actually does seem to work. The New York Times has just discovered the same thing:

I was in a vile, despicable mood when I arrived at laughter yoga. It was Wednesday, and my brain felt torn in one too many directions; the usual, only worse. Laughter seemed a remote possibility.

I waited patiently inside a nondescript office at 40th Street and Broadway among a group of wildly divergent strangers, with only my skepticism to keep me company.

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