Libya




Trevor Snapp writes in VICE Magazine: The Friday after former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak fled Cairo, I strolled through the postrevolution euphoria in Tahrir Square: men and women on their knees reciting…


Scholar Tarak Barkawi argues revolutions are caused by human agency; not telecommunications technologies, in Al Jazeera: To listen to the hype about social networking websites and the Egyptian revolution, one would think…







From the Daily Paul:

“The President does not have power under the Constitution to unilaterally authorize a military attack in a situation that does not involve stopping an actual or imminent threat to the nation.”
— Senator Barack Obama, December 20, 2007

Also, here’s Ron Paul on “Freedom Watch” (I don’t see how Napolitano can remain on Fox News, I think by this time next year, I’ll be he’ll have been kicked out):


Is the bombing of Libya Obama’s Iraq redux? Informed Comment says no, laying out the factors that make the Libyan intervention ethical, non-imperialist, and fundamentally different from Bush’s 2003 invasion. Convincing or…



Now I know Glenn Beck can be quite “eccentric” and he isn’t very popular here. However, I still group him under “alternative” news media as he does stray from the standard governmental spiel. I am not implying that he is correct. All I ask is you listen to what he has to say with an unbiased ear as he makes some interesting connections and predictions.









Libya Is Off the InternetVia BBC News:

As fighting inside the country intensifies, Libya’s links to the net appear to have been completely severed.

Net monitoring and security firms are reporting that no net traffic is entering or leaving Libyan net space.

Renesys said the outage was more than just a “blip” as many sites have been unreachable for more than 12 hours.

Net traffic into and out of the country had been intermittent during recent protests but the cut coincided with a push to oust rebels.

During the early days of the rebellion in Libya, net access was restricted but in early March net traffic started to pick up in areas no longer under the control of Colonel Gaddafi’s government.

Graphs of net activity maintained by Google show a steady rise in traffic to its sites throughout this week. In particular, Libyans were making heavy use of YouTube to post images of the conflict.