London













In a story straight from a 20th Century comic, sun rays reflecting off the curved glass of a London skyscraper nicknamed the Walkie Talkie building have melted a parked car. From BBC…


In 2010, Londoner Gemma Atkinson was restrained, handcuffed, and threatened with arrest for an “act of terror” after using her phone to film police as they engaged in a random stop-and-frisk of her boyfriend. She launched a legal battle, and, with the money from a settlement, produced the following short film about her experience and how to resist police abuse of power:



Hey London atheists, did you go to church today? The UK’s first atheist church is now holding services in Islington reports the Islington Gazette: Stand-up comedians Sanderson Jones and Pippa Evans will…


This past June, the Chilean arts group Los Casagrande dropped more than 100,000 poems, printed on scraps of paper, from a helicopter above central London in a performance titled the Bombing of Poems. They have done the same in Warsaw, Berlin, and Santiago — all cities which have been bombed during wartime.

Local government approved of the Bombing of Poems as a jubilant spectacle anticipating the pomp of the Olympic festivities to come, but the stunt’s meaning may be more ambiguous. Was the poetry drop an emergency measure in an era in which funding the arts has been deemed no longer possible, and the metropolis is dominated by finance? Is it a commentary on the blanketing of the city with propaganda?









783784-nPerformance art with an undertone of torture seems to be big right now — so at least it’s being put to good use in an animal rights protest shocking passersby in central London. The Herald Sun writes:

A young woman agreed to be tortured in full public view to try and end animal testing. Jacqueline Traide endured ten hours of injections, being smothered in different lotions, and irritants being squirted into her eyes as part of a world-wide campaign by Lush and The Humane Society International.

The stunt took place in a Lush store window on London’s Regent Street, one of the UK’s busiest shopping precincts. Passers-by were stunned by the display, with many stopping to take photos and record the gruesome spectacle with their phones.