Tag Archives | Los Angeles

‘It Never Ends': LAPD Homicide Detective Tweets Photo of Dead Body

Sal LabarberaSimone Wilson writes on LA Weekly:
Local arts blog LA Taco is fuming over the "callous" Twitter activity of LAPD Homicide Detective Sal LaBarbera. (As of December 2007, according to the Los Angeles Times, La Barbera was "a 20-year homicide veteran who heads the Watts homicide squad in LAPD's South Bureau.") LaBarbera is certainly active on Twitter -- throwing out RTs, #FFs and hashtags like he was born to the social-media generation. (The detective is also big on @ing journalists from local news stations and the Times.) His handle on the medium is pretty impressive for a weathered murder cop... ... and right out ahead of other police departments' slow struggle to incorporate social media into their investigative work.
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What Walkable Los Angeles Would Look Like

Suppose Los Angeles were like Paris, New York, et cetera, with dense, narrow, two-lane streets rather than wide, barren five-lane ones? Artist David Yoon conducted a “fantasy urban makeover in photographs” to show exactly this. On Narrow Streets LA, click on (actual) shots of Japantown, Santa Monica, Downtown, Melrose Avenue (below, real on left and photoshopped on right), and tons of other locations to reveal the far more pleasing, charming, and inviting narrowed versions — a fantastical vision of the non-car-dominated Los Angeles that never was but could have been:

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“Invisible Beam” Weapon To Be Used In Prisons (Video)

Amy Dusto writes on Discovery News:
Prison guards could soon stop fights with a harmless tool that shoots a laser-like beam, video game-style, down into a room where trouble is brewing. The Assault Intervention Device (AID), funded by the National Institute of Justice, is still large and unrefined but will soon be installed for trial in at least one prison, the Pitchess Detention Center in Los Angeles County. The AID directs an energy beam, which is in the invisible millimeter wavelength, that penetrates just deep enough beneath the skin to make the target's pain receptors shout. The sensation is a burn like touching a hot stove or an iron. It only lasts up to 3 seconds — the AID controls automatically shut the beam off to prevent shooting for longer without resetting the trigger finger. The beam can hit a target about 100 feet away, and is about as wide as a CD. According to Raytheon, the device's manufacturers, it causes no actual damage to nerves or skin. This video shows the sharp reflex caused by an AID hit, and the unscathed hit receivers.
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The Occult Symbolism of the Los Angeles Central Library

LA LibraryThanks to veteran disinfonaut Nimrod Erez for sending us along this story from Vigilant Citizen:

Throughout the history of Western Civilization, libraries have been the repositories of nations’ accumulated knowledge and the epicenters of their culture. Central libraries, more than being big buildings containing books, are important landmarks designed with impressive architecture and filled with symbolic art. The Los Angeles Central Library is certainly no exception. An in-depth look at the art found at the Library is quite a revealing one: It describes the occult philosophy of those in power. We will look at the Central Library’s history and the hidden meaning of its architecture.

Built in 1926, the Central Library is an important landmark of downtown Los Angeles. It is the central piece of one of the largest publicly funded library systems in the world, the Los Angeles Public Library (LAPL). Most touristic pamphlets describe the building’s design to be inspired by ancient Egyptian and Mediterranean Revival architecture.

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Brian Butler: The Wickedest Man In LA

Good to see one-time disinfo-collaborator Brian Butler being recognized as an occult expert. He was recently profiled by Charles Russell (of The Hills fame) in the Huffington Post:
Brian Butler speaks with the soft ease and quiet smirk of someone who either knows something you don't or simply doesn't care. There's some unseen force that compels him to create some of the most haunting installations employing film and music with the likes of Kenneth Anger and Vincent Gallo. He is more unflinchingly dedicated to the validity of his craft than the most rabid of people.
42 second trailer for Night of Pan directed by Brian Butler. Features Vincent Gallo and Kenneth Anger.
However, it is not today, which concerns him for he appears to exist outside the dimensional constraints of time. I sat down with him recently to discuss his new works being shown internationally, dispel the nasty rumors of him hypnotizing and hexing the masses...
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Secret Caves of the Lizard People

lizardpeopleSo now we know where David Icke got his reptilian conspiracy concept! From the wonderful world of Strange Maps:

This map is an essential ingredient of a story that has ‘Indiana Jones’ written all over it: secret caves, a lost civilisation and above all, a treasure trove of gold in unimaginable quantities. And all this in the ground below the present-day metropolis of Los Angeles.

Below are two extracts from the LA Times of 29 January 1934, in the first of which reporter Jean Bosquet details the incredible story of G. Warren Shufelt, a mining engineer, who had been told of the underground city and its treasures by a wise old Indian, had consequently located it via ‘radio X-ray’ and was currently sinking shafts into the ground to reach it.

The second extract explains the whereabouts of the putative underground city on the map, and provides the legends for a few photos showing Shufelt hard at work.

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L.A. Agrees to Limit Medical-Marijuana Dispensaries

What do you think, should there be limits on how many medical marijuana outlets a city has, and where they can be situated? Tamara Audi reports on an effort to do just that in Los Angeles, for the Wall Street Journal:

The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday delayed a vote on a much-anticipated medical marijuana ordinance, asking planning officials to return next week with information on how many dispensaries could be closed because they are near homes, schools and public gathering sites.

Council members indicated a vote could come in January on the draft ordinance, which would provide guidelines to greatly reduce the number of marijuana storefronts and push them out of neighborhoods and into industrial areas. The City Council agreed Tuesday to limit the number of dispensaries to 70.

When the state passed a law allowing for medical-marijuana cooperatives in 2004, Los Angeles never set forth guidelines for how they should operate.

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