Tag Archives | Machine Learning

Jürgen Schmidhuber to do AMA on reddit /r/MachineLearning

"Structure of the Universe" by NASA, ESA, and E. Hallman (University of Colorado, Boulder) - http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/hst_img_20080520.html. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Structure of the Universe” by NASA, ESA, and E. Hallman (University of Colorado, Boulder) – http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/hst_img_20080520.html. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Jürgen Schmidhuber will be hosting an AMA (Ask Me Anything) on the subreddit, /r/machinelearning, this Wednesday (March 4) at 10am EST.

From Schmidhuber’s website:

Since age 15 or so, Prof. Jürgen Schmidhuber’s main scientific ambition has been to build an optimal scientist through self-improving Artificial Intelligence (AI), then retire. He has pioneered self-improving general problem solvers since 1987, and Deep Learning Neural Networks (NNs)since 1991. The recurrent NNs (RNNs) developed by his research groups at the Swiss AI Lab IDSIA & USI & SUPSI (ex-TU MunichCogBotLab) were the first RNNs to win official international contests. They recently helped to improve connected handwriting recognition, speech recognition, machine translation, optical character recognition, image caption generation, and are now in use at Google, Microsoft, IBM, Baidu, and many other companies.

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Google’s Virtual Brain Goes On YouTube And Looks For Cat Videos

Kaibara87 (CC)

Sounds like Google’s virtual “brain” consisting of 16,000 networked computers does a pretty good job of enjoying the same dumb stuff that humans do. John Markoff reports for the Sydney Morning Herald:

Inside Google’s secretive X laboratory, known for inventing self-driving cars and augmented reality glasses, a small group of researchers began working several years ago on a simulation of the human brain.

There Google scientists created one of the largest neural networks for machine learning by connecting 16,000 computer processors, which they turned loose on the internet to learn on its own.

Presented with 10 million digital images found in YouTube videos, what did Google’s brain do? What millions of humans do with YouTube: looked for cats.

The neural network taught itself to recognise cats, which is actually no frivolous activity. This week the researchers will present the results of their work at a conference in Edinburgh, Scotland.

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