Tag Archives | Magnets

Watch Neodymium Magnets Crush Stuff In Slow-Mo

Stick your finger in there, I dare ya.

If you’re wondering what the hell a neodymium magnet is (like I was), it’s “the most widely used type of rare-earth magnet, is a permanent magnet made from an alloy of neodymium, iron and boron to form the Nd2Fe14B tetragonal crystalline structure.” It’s the strongest type of permanent magnet currently available (at least, commercially).

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Magnets Can Influence Heat and Sound

Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered how to control heat with a magnetic field. An experiment proved that the phonon--the elementary particle that carries heat and sound--has magnetic properties. This artist's rendering, based on computer simulations, depicts a phonon heating solid material. Atoms of the material, shown in orange, are joined with flexible atomic bonds, shown as springs. The phonon imparts heat by colliding with the center atom, creating a vibration in the springs. The trail of the passing phonon is marked with increased magnetic field intensity, shown in green. The figure in the lower right shows the direction of the applied magnetic field. The researchers found that a sufficiently strong magnetic field can cause phonons to collide with each other and be deflected off-course, which slows the flow of heat through the material. Credit: Image by Renee Ripley, courtesy of The Ohio State University.

Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered how to control heat with a magnetic field. 
Credit: Image by Renee Ripley, courtesy of The Ohio State University.

I think my stereo’s speakers proved that last one, but anyway, via ScienceDaily:

Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered how to control heat with a magnetic field.

In the March 23 issue of the journal Nature Materials, they describe how a magnetic field roughly the size of a medical MRI reduced the amount of heat flowing through a semiconductor by 12 percent.

The study is the first ever to prove that acoustic phonons — the elemental particles that transmit both heat and sound — have magnetic properties.

“This adds a new dimension to our understanding of acoustic waves,” said Joseph Heremans, Ohio Eminent Scholar in Nanotechnology and professor of mechanical engineering at Ohio State. “We’ve shown that we can steer heat magnetically.

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Gay Marriage is Scientifically Impossible Because Magnets

img-thingMagnets: How Do They Work? If you’re attempting to prove that gay marriage is scientifically impossible then the answer is not very well. Not. Very. Well. A Nigerian student has attempted to use magnets to “scientifically” prove that gay marriage is impossible.

Death and Taxes:

A bar magnet is a horizontal magnet that has the North Pole and the South Pole and when you bring two bar magnets and you bring the North Pole together you find that the two North Poles will not attract. They will repel, that is, they will push away themselves showing that a man should not attract a man. If you bring two South Poles together you find that the two South Poles will not attract indicating that same sex marriage should not hold. A female should not attract a female as South Pole of a magnet does not attract the South Pole of a magnet.

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‘Magnetic Bubbles’ Found Around Solar System Edge

Photo: NASA

A digital image of the newly theorized 'foam zone'.

Is our solar system a ‘cosmic jacuzzi filled with magnetic bubbles’? The outer shield of our solar system was thought to be smooth, like soda gone flat, but new theory believes it may foam-like filled with “bubbles.” From National Geographic:

The edge of the solar system may be a frothy sea of giant magnetic “bubbles,” a new NASA study says.

The new findings may mean that our system’s magnetic barrier—once thought to be a smooth shield—may be letting in more harmful cosmic rays and energetic particles than previously thought.

The new “foam zone” theory is based on a computer model created using data from NASA’s twin Voyager spacecraft, both launched in 1977 and currently about 10 billion miles (16 billion kilometers) from Earth.

In 2007 Voyager 1 recorded dramatic dips and rises in the amount of electrons it encountered as the craft traveled through the heliosphere—the “force field” that surrounds the entire solar system and is created by the sun’s magnetic field.

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