Tag Archives | Marijuana

“Crossfaded”: What happens when you’re drunk and stoned at the same time?

By Elvert Barnes via Flickr.

By Elvert Barnes via Flickr.

Luckily, Popular Science has the answer.

via Popsci:

The intoxicating effects of alcohol and of marijuana have been widely studied, but their combined effect—getting “cross-faded“—is woefully underexplored scientific territory. Here’s a look at what we know about how pot and booze together affect the brain.

First, the basics: Marijuana contains THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), which acts on the brain’s cannabinoid receptors. Alcohol depresses the central nervous system. Trying to compare the two isn’t even like comparing apples and oranges, says Gary Wenk, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Ohio State University. “It’s apples and vegetables. They’re very different drugs.” An extremely simplified explanation would be to say that THC largely has cognitive effects, like paranoia and a distorted sense of time, while alcohol mainly affects motor skills, making it hard to walk in a straight line and causing slurred speech.

So does combining weed and alcohol just add their respective effects together?

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The Feds Continue to Spread Misinformation About Marijuana

Some cannabis bud, which is well-cured (i.e. dried slowly following a specific procedure). The strain is Sweet Tooth #3

Some cannabis bud, which is well-cured (i.e. dried slowly following a specific procedure). The strain is Sweet Tooth #3

Or maybe it’s more disinformation than misinformation. Either way, I’m guessing that none of you are surprised.

via AlterNet (Please follow the link to read the entire piece):

In her latest blog post, US National Institute on Drug Abuse director Nora Volkow claims that “science should guide marijuana policy.” But if the nation’s top anti-drug doc truly believes that facts, not ideological rhetoric, ought to shape America’s drug policies, why does she feel the need to keep distorting the truth about pot?

Writes Volkow: “Besides being addictive, marijuana is cognitively impairing even beyond the phase of acute intoxication and regular use during adolescence may cause a significant, possibly permanent IQ loss.”

Or, more than likely, it may not. In fact, the very study Volkow relies on to make this questionable claim was publically repudiated in a 2012 review published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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A simple way to counter the paranoia side effect of Marijuana

Close-up of cluster of female cannabis plant by Bokske via Wikimedia Commons

Close-up of cluster of female cannabis plant by Bokske via Wikimedia Commons

As someone who stopped smoking recreationally because of the paranoia/anxiety inducing side effects, this is rather interesting. Maybe I’ll try it out one day.

via AlterNet:

According to a recent report by Marijuana.com, sniffing black peppercorns could be the simple answer to reducing the paranoia effects sometimes felt after smoking pot. By simply smelling or chewing on peppercorns after lighting up, smokers can mitigate these effects, writes Jay Arthur.

Owen Smith writes in Canada’s Cannabis Digest that while at Victoria Cannabis Buyers Club, he witnessed the impact pepper had on pot. “Most patients who have tried this simply took a few sniffs of the black pepper to receive an almost immediate effect,” he wrote. “Others have reported that after chewing on pepper corns they felt relief within an hour, but that may be a delay most would seek to avoid.”

Why would this work?

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Why is the New York Times Pushing Pot?

EP - Detail of a New York Times Advertisement - 1895.jpg

One has to consider that the source of this op-ed by Liz Peek is Republican Party mouthpiece Fox News, but still it’s a question worth asking given the Times’ near-maniacal support of the marijuana legalization movement:

The legalize-pot bandwagon has a new conductor. With the single-mindedness of Hillary Clinton seeking the Oval Office, the New York Times is pushing for legalization of marijuana. The paper has published no fewer than eight editorials or op-eds approving speedy decriminalization of pot in just the past few weeks. What’s it all about?

Let us dismiss conjecture that the Times is gunning for a Public Service Pulitzer, which they have not won for a decade. Instead, two thoughts occur.

First, the Times may view decriminalizing marijuana as the next great progressive wave, following on the heels of same-sex marriage and, in earlier years, abortion rights. A smaller wave, to be sure, but one that liberals (and libertarians) can ride with enthusiasm.

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Anti-Marijuana Ad Positions Marijuana as a Date Rape Drug

Taken from No on 2's Facebook page.

Taken from No on 2′s Facebook page.

What will they come up with next?

via News.Mic:

The news: This has gone too far. In its latest attempt to prevent the legalization of medical marijuana, a Florida group has launched a new campaign that suggests pot — not alcohol or roofies — will be used for date rape.

Sorry, ‘No On 2,’ marijuana is simply not a date rape drug.

Here’s how actual date rape drugs work: Predators slip drugs like ketamines (Special K) or rohypnol (roofies), which typically have no color, smell or taste, into drinks or food when their target isn’t paying attention. The drugs not only make you physically weak but slow down your brain, making you feel confused and sometimes knocking you unconscious, thereby unable to refuse sex.

Marijuana doesn’t work that way. Worse still, misleading ads like these distract people from the fact that a (perfectly legal) drug is the single most commonly used substance to help commit sexual assault — alcohol.

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Could Cannabis-Based Batteries Be The Future?

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Another win for the cannabis industry.

via AlterNet:

On top of its vast medicinal benefits and a “high” that’s safer and mellower than alcohol, what if cannabis could also power a cheap, sustainable super battery and forever change the energy game? It sounds like a far-fetched dream cooked up by Cheech and Chong after a bong rip or three, but it’s possible, according to a team of researchers at the University of Alberta.

During the American Chemical Society’s national meeting in San Francisco on Tuesday, engineering professor David Mitlin (who now works at Clarkson University in New York) presented the findings. The study he led investigates the potential for industrial hemp (the non-psychoactive cannabis plant closely related to marijuana) to aid in the creation of extremely efficient batteries called supercapacitors, or “supercaps.” By heating hemp fibers, the researchers were able to rearrange the plant’s carbon atoms to create thin, two-dimensional sheets, or nanosheets.

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The UN says this country is smoking the most marijuana

No, it’s not the Netherlands or even Jamaica.

Pollinated hemp flowers. By Erik Fenderson, 2006-01-01.

Pollinated hemp flowers. By Erik Fenderson, 2006-01-01.

via AlterNet:

The people of Iceland are the happiest on Earth, according to an academic study reported by the Guardian in 2006. The UN’s latest Human Development Index ranking showed Iceland topping the charts as far as its economic and social issues go (wealth, healthcare, and education). Last month Iceland won another top world ranking: most pot smoked per capita.

The recent United Nations 2014 World Drug Report, which broke down pot use by nation, found that 18 percent of Iceland’s population (meaning 55,000 out of 320,000 people) lit up in 2012 (the year for which the data was collected). That’s more than the average in stereotypically pot-friendly Jamaica; it’s more than Amsterdam’s home country, the Netherlands; and it’s more than the US. (The UN report found 15% pot use in the US.)

In past reports New Zealand topped the list for most cannabis use per capita, closely followed by Canada and the US, as Paul Armentano, deputy director of NORML (National Organization for Reform of Marijuana Laws), notes.

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Avoiding Dumb Marijuana Legalization

The Marijuana Debate: do we follow Colorado?

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The debate surrounding the legalization of marijuana in the US has picked up pace due to the recent results of the Colorado Marijuana experiment, in which the substance was legalized in January in order to see what the economic and social impact would be. Crime rates have lowered and the revenue generated from tax and licensing is predicted to reach $100 million within a year. However, is the approach to this legalization all too commercial? If we proceed with legalizing marijuana in the same manner we did with alcohol after prohibition, will it become just another commercial tool for the government to exploit the public?

How would marijuana make the government money?

As with everything, the government is able to tax alcohol and they can increase or decrease this depending on their needs. For example, recent budget cuts have resulted in states, such as Maryland, raising the sale tax rate on alcohol by 3% in order to increase revenue.Read the rest

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The White House Tries, Fails to Explain Why Marijuana Should Remain Illegal

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Photo: Matt H. Wade. CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

The New York Times and the White House are at odds over legalizing marijuana:

No sooner had the Times published its opening editorials advocating legalization of marijuana than the White House fired back with an unconvincing response on its website. It argued that marijuana should remain illegal because of public health problems “associated” (always a slippery word) with increased marijuana use.

Careful readers will immediately see the White House statement for what it is: A pro forma response to a perceived public relations crisis, not a full-fledged review of all the scientific evidence, pro and con. The White House is actually required by law to oppose all efforts to legalize a banned drug.

Besides, it is hypocritical for the White House, whose chefs brew beer for the president, to oppose legalizing marijuana, which poses far less risk to consumers and society than does alcohol.

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New York Times Editorial Board Backs Legalization of Marijuana

Fremont Solstice Parade 2008 - American joint 01The New York Times editorial board is generally not one to challenge the establishment but in today’s edition it comes out firmly in favor of legalizing marijuana in an editorial article entitled “Repeal Prohibition, Again”:

It took 13 years for the United States to come to its senses and end Prohibition, 13 years in which people kept drinking, otherwise law-abiding citizens became criminals and crime syndicates arose and flourished. It has been more than 40 years since Congress passed the current ban on marijuana, inflicting great harm on society just to prohibit a substance far less dangerous than alcohol.
The federal government should repeal the ban on marijuana.

We reached that conclusion after a great deal of discussion among the members of The Times’s Editorial Board, inspired by a rapidly growing movement among the states to reform marijuana laws.

There are no perfect answers to people’s legitimate concerns about marijuana use.

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