Tag Archives | Marijuana

Psychoactive Sermon 2: Submission to a Higher Order of Knowing

Join me as I rant about my summoning into the Occult by mysterious 5th dimensional entities and the omnipresence of dualities in spiritual thought. Find out how this relates to the creative polarities of shamanic and western materialist philosophy and why these forces need to increasingly commingle if we’re to evolve heavenward.

Buy an autographed copy of my book, The Galactic Dialogue: Occult Initiations here.

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Never Get Busted Again

Hey Disinfonauts, thought you might like to know that we’ve uploaded Never Get Busted Again: Volume 1 Traffic Stops to YouTube. You can now watch it for free.

Watch Barry Cooper, a former police officer in Texas focusing on narcotics interdiction for eight years, teach you exactly what you need to know to stay out of jail. With over 800 felony and misdemeanor narcotics arrests, DEA training, and extensive experience with K-9s (drug dogs), Barry’s friendly, plain spoken and honest attitude makes it easy and entertaining for you to learn what you need to know.

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Guns and Pot: Which States Are Friendly to Both?

venn

via Reason.com [Follow the link to check out the rest of the analysis and a funny “Guns and Dope Party gif”] :

A Reddit user recently posted a graphic called “The Venn Diagram of Cultural Politics,” showing which states allow at least some citizens to use marijuana, which states recognize gay marriages, and which do both. The chart got us wondering: Which places embrace the personal freedoms beloved by the left and the right? Where can you buy both a vibrator and a Big Gulp? Where can a gay couple not just marry but avoid a high sin tax on the cigarettes they smoke after sex? Where can you carry a gun while passing a joint?

The image below tackles that last question. If you include states that have legalized marijuana for medicinal purposes only, there are now 24 states that permit pot. There are 42 states where an adult non-felon’s right to carry a concealed gun is either unrestricted or subject only to permissive “shall issue” laws.

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The Uber for Pot App

eazeYou just know Eaze, the “Uber for Pot” app, is going to be massive (unless or until Apple quashes it). Story from Pando:

“Uber for pot” exists because of course it does.

Last July, former Yammer executive Keith McCarty took the leap from enterprise software solutions to marijuana tech by launching Eaze, an app that allows patients to order medicinal marijuana within minutes on their smartphone.

It may sound like one of Dave Chappelle’s schemes from the movie “Half Baked,” but McCarty and his team are serious about providing a fast, easy way for people to access medical marijuana. His staff includes a number of executives with a history in health-care, and today the company has announced $1.5 million in funding along with a partnership with SPARC, a San Francisco-based dispensary and nonprofit advocacy collective.

“Our core values are providing an easy, quick way for patients to receive medical marijuana, and SPARC’s been performing that since Day One,” McCarty says.

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Why Legalizing Medical Marijuana Will Make Investors Extremely Wealthy

So-called pot stocks have been a hot investment theme for a while in the OTC (Over The Counter) market, but with articles like this one in Forbes claiming that it’s the next get rich quick idea, perhaps the incentive to legalize will become unstoppable for lawmakers:

I never thought I’d see more people invest in marijuana than smoke it.

But those investments are exactly what’s about to happen given a recent survey from some of the most influential and social analysts in the BioPharma space.  In fact, according to Investing.com and our research, two-thirds (2/3) of the analysts love the potential of the marijuana industry since the $50 Billion market is already developed, albeit illegal.  The process of stepped legalization has started and continuing prospects look promising.

Armstrong Legalize Marijuana 2001

Yet there are dual dilemmas facing public medical marijuana companies in the United States. First, even if it’s legal for in-state cannabis companies, no businesses are federally legalized to sell the plant or the plant’s derivatives in any shape or form. Will the federal government’s tacit overlooking of the national cannabis laws continue?

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3rd Generation Kennedy Fears Marijuana Legalization

Congressional Portrait of Patrick J. Kennedy (D-RI)

Congressional Portrait of Patrick J. Kennedy (D-RI)

via Reason.com:

Former Rep. Patrick Kennedy (D-RI) has just published an op-ed in Ozy titled, “What No One is Saying about Marijuana,” where he sounds the alarm that “Addiction is big business, and with legal marijuana it’s only getting bigger.”

A recidivist drug and alcohol abuser (who has miraculously avoided jail time despite committing crimes while under the influence that would send lesser mortals to prison on felony convictions) arguing for the continued imprisonment of adults choosing to responsibly consume a substance is rich in its own right. But for a third-generation Kennedy to argue against ending marijuana prohibition because major profits will be made off of it is head-exploding irony and hypocrisy.

Perhaps the ex-Congressman missed the just-concluded final season of Boardwalk Empire, which included a major subplot depicting his grandfather, Joseph P. Kennedy, shrewdly anticipating the end of alcohol prohibition and getting in on the ground floor of legally importing liquor into the United States.

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This Is Your Brain on Drugs

A Harvard-Northwestern study has found differences between the brains of young adult marijuana smokers and those of nonsmokers. In these composite scans, colors represent the differences — in the shape of the amygdala, top, and nucleus accumbens. Yellow indicates areas that are most different, red the least. Credit The Journal of Neuroscience

A Harvard-Northwestern study has found differences between the brains of young adult marijuana smokers and those of nonsmokers. In these composite scans, colors represent the differences — in the shape of the amygdala, top, and nucleus accumbens. Yellow indicates areas that are most different, red the least. Credit The Journal of Neuroscience

Want to know what your brain looks like when you smoke weed? If so you’re in luck because some scientists at Harvard and Northwestern University have taken photographs of marujuana-affected brain scans and analyzed what happens. Report via the New York Times:

The gray matter of the nucleus accumbens, the walnut-shaped pleasure center of the brain, was glowing like a flame, showing a notable increase in density. “It could mean that there’s some sort of drug learning taking place,” speculated Jodi Gilman, at her computer screen at the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Center for Addiction Medicine. Was the brain adapting to marijuana exposure, rewiring the reward system to demand the drug?

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How marijuana legalization in Colorado and Washington is making the world a better place

"Marijuana Ambulance" by Hammerin Man via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

“Marijuana Ambulance” by Hammerin Man via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

via Washington Post:

No pressure, Colorado and Washington, but the world is scrutinizing your every move.

That was the take-home message of an event today at the Brookings Institution, discussing the international impact of the move toward marijuana legalization at the state-level in the U.S. Laws passed in Colorado and Washington, with other states presumably to come, create a tension with the U.S. obligations toward three major international treaties governing drug control. Historically the U.S. has been a strong advocate of all three conventions, which “commit the United States to punish and even criminalize activity related to
recreational marijuana,” according to Brookings’ Wells Bennet.

The U.S. response to this tension has thusfar been to call for more “flexibility” in how countries interpret them. This policy was made explicit in recent remarks by Assistant Secretary of State William Brownfield, wholast week at the United Nations said that “we have to be tolerant of different countries, in response to their own national circumstances and conditions, exploring and using different national drug control policies.” He went on: “How could I, a representative of the Government of the United States of America, be intolerant of a government that permits any experimentation with legalization of marijuana if two of the 50 states of the United States of America have chosen to walk down that road?”

As far as policy stances go this is an aggressively pragmatic solution. The federal government lacks the resources and perhaps the political will to crack down on the legalization states, but it also likely doesn’t want to openly admit that it’s allowing regulation regimes that openly contradict the provisions of major treaties.

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New 20-Year Study Shatters Myths About Marijuana Use

Professor Wayne Hall has published the results of a 20-year study of the use of marijuana in the journal Addiction (PDF of Full Study article here), which summarizes his findings as follows:

Adverse effects of acute cannabis use

  • Cannabis does not produce fatal overdoses.
  • Driving while cannabis-intoxicated doubles the risk of a car crash; this risk increases substantially if users are also alcohol-intoxicated.
  • Cannabis use during pregnancy slightly reduces birth weight of the baby.

Adverse effects of chronic cannabis use

  • Regular cannabis users can develop a dependence syndrome, the risks of which are around 1 in 10 of all cannabis users and 1 in 6 among those who start in adolescence.
  • Regular cannabis users double their risks of experiencing psychotic symptoms and disorders, especially if they have a personal or family history of psychotic disorders, and if they start using cannabis in their mid-teens.
  • Regular adolescent cannabis users have lower educational attainment than non-using peers but we don’t know whether the link is causal.
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Legal highs need regulation, not an outright ban

Bans don’t work. matthijs, CC BY-NC-ND

Bans don’t work. matthijs, CC BY-NC-ND

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
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By Matthew Warren, University of Oxford

A few doors down from my house, a man is selling drugs. He has herbs to smoke that could leave me happy and stoned and various white powders to ingest that could keep me partying all night. All this would be totally legal, because he runs my local head shop.

Such easy access means people succumb to buying these drugs. One in five freshers who are starting universities this month have admitted to trying one of these legal highs.

Like many countries, the UK is currently working out how to deal with legal highs, or, to use the proper nomenclature, New Psychoactive Substances (NPS). Over the past decade, the use of NPS has become increasingly common as more and more products and head shops enter the market.… Read the rest

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