Tag Archives | marine biology

Sharks Discovered Inside the Underwater Volcano, Kavachi

Recently, scientists discovered sharks swimming in the underwater volcano, Kavachi. This raises some interesting questions for scientists. Mainly, because the volcano is active, how do the sharks know when it will erupt?

Via the National Geographic YouTube description:

A real life sharkcano? Ocean engineer Brennan Phillips led a team to the remote Solomon Islands in search of hydrothermal activity. They found plenty of activity—including sharks in a submarine volcano. The main peak of the volcano, called Kavachi, was not erupting during their expedition, so they were able to drop instruments, including a deep-sea camera, into the crater. The footage revealed hammerheads and silky sharks living inside, seemingly unaffected by the hostile temperatures and acidity.

Phillips said, “You never know what you’re going to find. Especially when you are working deep underwater. The deeper you go, the stranger it gets.” They knew they would see interesting geology but weren’t sure about the biology.

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Rare “Sea Serpent” Oarfish Found on California Island

PHOTOGRAPH BY TYLER DVORAK, CATALINA ISLAND CONSERVANCY

PHOTOGRAPH BY TYLER DVORAK, CATALINA ISLAND CONSERVANCY

Amazing…

Jane J. Lee via NatGeo:

Another one bites the dust: A dead oarfish has washed ashore on Catalina Island, roughly 22 miles (35 kilometers) off the coast of Los Angeles. It’s the fifth of the mysterious deep-sea creatures to flop onto West Coast beaches within the past year.

Tyler Dvorak with the Catalina Island Conservancy spied the carcass while scanning a beach on the northeastern end of Catalina with binoculars on June 1. “I knew what it was immediately because of the one that washed up last year,” the biologist says.

“It was a pretty weird thing to see,” says Dvorak, who photographed it while his colleague contacted researchers in Los Angeles, who were eventually able to collect parts of the 14-foot (4.3-meter) long animal. (Watch rare video of two live oarfish in Baja, California.)

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How we found world’s deepest fish in the Mariana Trench – and why we must keep exploring

The record-breaker poses for the camera, 8,145m below the waves. Oceanlab, University of Aberdeen, CC BY

The record-breaker poses for the camera, 8,145m below the waves. Oceanlab, University of Aberdeen, CC BY

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
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By Alan Jamieson, University of Aberdeen

It was our 14th expedition to the trenches of the Pacific Ocean, where depths can exceed 10,000m. And it was due to be our last for the foreseeable future.

We had been aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s (SOI) vessel RV Falkor for 30 days. It was almost over. Then, it turned out to be “the big one”.

For this was the expedition in which my colleagues and I discovered a snailfish living some eight kilometres below the waves, deeper than any fish we know of. My colleagues from the University of Hawaii even recovered some in their traps.

In the past six years we have made many discoveries in the depths, such as the missing order of Decapoda (shrimps) that were long thought absent from the trenches but are actually rather conspicuous.… Read the rest

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The Surprising Power of an Electric Eel’s Shock

Doug Letterman (CC BY 2.0)

Doug Letterman (CC BY 2.0)

via The New York Times:

For thousands of years, fishermen knew that certain fish could deliver a painful shock, even though they had no idea how it happened. Only in the late 1700s did naturalists contemplate a bizarre possibility: These fish might release jolts of electricity — the same mysterious substance as in lightning.

That possibility led an Italian physicist named Alessandro Volta in 1800 to build an artificial electric fish. He observed that electric stingrays had dense stacks of muscles, and he wondered if they allowed the animals to store electric charges. To mimic the muscles, he built a stack of metal disks, alternating between copper and zinc.

Volta found that his model could store a huge amount of electricity, which he could unleash as shocks and sparks. Today, much of society runs on updated versions of Volta’s artificial electric fish. We call them batteries.

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Rare Footage of a Black Seadevil (Deep-Sea Anglerfish)

Deep-sea anglerfish are strange and elusive creatures that are very rarely observed in their natural habitat. Fewer than half a dozen have ever been captured on film or video by deep diving research vehicles. This little angler, about 9 cm long, is named Melanocetus. It is also known as the Black Seadevil and it lives in the deep dark waters of the Monterey Canyon. MBARI’s ROV Doc Ricketts observed this anglerfish for the first time at 600 m on a midwater research expedition in November 2014. We believe that this is the first video footage ever made of this species alive and at depth.

h/t Live Science.

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