Marriage





Davecat lives with his wife and mistress, both dolls, and thinks synthetic partners are ideal for those who don’t want to deal with humans’ inconsistencies. (Atlantic article.) Davecat met his future wife,…


Collectors Weekly reminds us that “traditional” marriage isn’t what conservative pundits have made it out to be. Despite the fondness among certain politicians and pundits for “traditional marriage,” a nostalgic-sounding concept that…


astrological signsThis news could shake up a lot of people’s worlds. Smithsonian Magazine writes:

A team from the University of Manchester analyzed 10 million marriages, using census data from the U.K. and inferring astrological signs from couples’ birth dates.

Astrologists have ideas about which signs make the best matches—a Sagittarius is better off with a Leo or Aquarius than a Cancer. But the University of Manchester team found that lonely hearts who worry about the zodiac are wasting their time.

The study concludes: “This research shows that astrological sign has no impact on the probability of marrying – and staying married to – someone of any other sign.”




New York Times-bestselling author and Tea Party activist Jerome Corsi, whose political analysis is featured at 1776 Nation and WorldNetDaily, delivers the election year bombshell. Unearthed photos from young adulthood show Barack Obama sporting a wedding band-style ring, the final piece in a puzzle which points to one thing: a hush-hush marriage to his male Pakistani roommate, with whom Corsi says Obama was suspiciously “chummy”. Corsi also doubts that our president actually attended Columbia University, despite teachers’ and students’ recollections of his presence:


Via CTV News:

More than a century’s worth of matrimony wasn’t enough to keep them together.

After 115 years as an item, two tortoises at an Austrian zoo have decided to call it quits.

Trouble began recently when Bibi and Poldi started to pester one another in the cage they’ve shared at the Klagenfurt Austrian Zoo, where they’ve resided for 36 years.

The two hulking creatures grew up together and, until now, have been inseparable. But now, the star-crossed tortoises refuse to share a cage with one another. “We get the feeling they can’t stand the sight of each other anymore,” Zoo Director Helga Happ told Austrian Times.




Very interesting perspective from Garry Wills in the New York Review of Books given the current media circus regarding President Obama’s personal support of same-sex marriage: Why do some people who would…



t1larg.like.button.fbViolence stemming from the inevitable confusion over marital duties in the internet age, via Yahoo! News:

A 36-year-old Texas man has pleaded not guilty to battery charges after allegedly attacking his estranged wife for failing to “Like” a status update he posted to Facebook.

Benito Apolinar had posted an update to his Facebook page about the anniversary of his mother’s death. Angry that the post had elicited no response from his wife of 15 years, he confronted her after dropping off their children at her home in Carlsbad, New Mexico on Tuesday.

“That’s amazing everyone ‘Likes’ my status but you, you’re my wife. You should be the first one to ‘Like’ my status,” he allegedly told her before punching her in the cheek and pulling her hair.




Monkey HorrorHumanity, look out. There is no way by causing this action, it will turn out well for all of humanity. Via the Huffington Post:

In the small village of Talwas, Rajasthan, Raju, a well-known cigarette smoking monkey, and his bride Chinki were married, according to Stuff.

Raju had become a local celebrity after Ramesh Saini, a rickshaw driver, adopted him three years ago when he found the monkey unconscious.

He’s been a surrogate son to the childless Ramesh ever since.

“I want to enjoy the feelings of a son’s marriage through Raju’s wedding.” Ramesh told the publication. “We will welcome the bride in our house … after the wedding with all rituals.”


Via the Huffington Post:

The number of children living apart from their fathers has more than doubled in the last fifty years, from 11 percent in 1960 to 27 percent in 2010.

That’s one of the key findings from a new report on fatherhood in the United the States that was released Wednesday by the Pew Research Center’s Social & Demographic Trends project — just in time for Father’s Day.

The findings paint a grim picture of many fathers’ lack of involvement in their children’s lives, using data from over 10,000 people to determine the percentage of “absent” or “non-resident” fathers in America, which the report defines as those who do not live with their children.

A decline in marriage rates may be partially to blame. In 1960, 72 percent of the adult population was married; that share had dropped to 52 percent by 2008. Eighty seven percent of children ages 17 and younger were living with two married parents in 1960 compared with 64 percent in 2008.

According to the report’s co-author Gretchen Livingston, an increase in divorce rates over the last half-century may also play a role.






New Zealand’s Sunday Star Times carries the most disturbing personal tragedy I’ve read about in a very long time: An HIV-positive man injected his wife with his own blood while she slept,…