Tag Archives | Martin Luther King Jr.

What the Corporate Media Won’t Tell You about MLK | Interview with Drs. Jared Ball and Wilmer Leon

Abby Martin hosts a discussion on the ‘whitewashing’ of the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. speaking with Howard University Professor Dr. Wilmer J. Leon, and Morgan State University Professor Dr. Jared A. Ball, about the aspects of MLK’s life that the corporate media overlooks.

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The FBI’s Letter To Martin Luther King Jr. Urging Him To Commit Suicide

The anonymous note ends, “King, there is only one thing left for you to do. You know what it is. You are done. There is but one way out for you. You better take it before your filthy, abnormal fraudulent self is bared to the nation.” Via Letters of Note:

In November of 1964, fearful of his connection to the Communist Party through Stanley Levison, the FBI anonymously sent Martin Luther King a threatening letter, along with a cassette that contained the fruits of a 9 month surveillance project — allegedly incriminating audio recordings of King with women in various hotel rooms.

[View the rest at Letters of Note]… Read the rest

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The Martin Luther King You Don’t See on TV

You Are STILL Being Lied To: The NEW Disinformation Guide to Media Distortion, Historical Whitewashes and Cultural MythsThis classic essay on MLK by Jeff Cohen and Norman Solomon is included in the disinformation anthology You Are STILL Being Lied To:

It’s become a TV ritual: Every year in mid-January, around the time of Martin Luther King’s birthday, we get perfunctory network news reports about “the slain civil rights leader.”

The remarkable thing about this annual review of King’s life is that several years — his last years — are totally missing, as if flushed down a memory hole.

What TV viewers see is a closed loop of familiar file footage: King battling desegregation in Birmingham (1963); reciting his dream of racial harmony at the rally in Washington (1963); marching for voting rights in Selma, Alabama (1965); and finally, lying dead on the motel balcony in Memphis (1968).

An alert viewer might notice that the chronology jumps from 1965 to 1968. Yet King didn’t take a sabbatical near the end of his life.

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Martin Luther King Jr. On Being Awake For The Revolution

Via the New Inquiry, from the Oberlin College Commencement Address in 1965:

I’m sure that you have read that arresting little story from the pen of Washington Irving entitled Rip Van Winkle. The thing that we usually remember is that Rip Van Winkle slept 20 years. But there is another point in that story that is almost always completely overlooked: he slept through a revolution. When Rip [awoke and] looked up at the picture of George Washington, he was completely lost; he knew not who he was.

There are all too many people who, in some great period of social change, fail to achieve the new mental outlooks that the new situation demands. There is nothing more tragic than to sleep through a revolution. There can be no gainsaying of the fact that a great revolution is taking place in our world today. It is a social revolution, sweeping away the old order of colonialism.

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King: I Have a Dream. Obama: I Have a Drone

Martin Luther King Jr with medallion NYWTSA simple twist of fate has set President Obama’s second Inaugural Address for January 21, the same day as the Martin Luther King Jr. national holiday.

Obama made no mention of King during the Inauguration four years ago — but since then, in word and deed, the president has done much to distinguish himself from the man who said “I have a dream.”

After his speech at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in August 1963, King went on to take great risks as a passionate advocate for peace.

After his Inaugural speech in January 2009, Obama has pursued policies that epitomize King’s grim warning in 1967: “When scientific power outruns moral power, we end up with guided missiles and misguided men.”

But Obama has not ignored King’s anti-war legacy. On the contrary, the president has gone out of his way to distort and belittle it.

In his eleventh month as president — while escalating the U.S.… Read the rest

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What Tony Bennett Said About 9/11 Martin Luther King Jr. Would Have Also

TonyBennettJazz singer Tony Bennett, a WWII veteran and pacifist, speaking about 9/11 and American militarism on the Howard Stern Show comments, ”But who are the terrorists? Are we the terrorists or are they the terrorists? Two wrongs don’t make a right. They flew the plane in, but we caused it … Because we were bombing them and they told us to stop.”

Martin Luther King Jr. would have agreed with Tony exposing US history leading to 9/11.

As Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., in his world shaking sermon, “Beyond Vietnam — a Time to Break Silence”, recounted to us the history of the lies, from 1945 onward, used to trick Americans into supporting the Vietnam war, today he would be exposing the lies that have concealed secret arrangements for CIA covert crimes against humanity in the Middle East, Africa and elsewhere in the world since 1953 — arrangements that always originate within a dominant financial element that rules our society through ownership and manipulation of 98% of all electronic and print media sources of information.… Read the rest

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Martin Luther King Jr.’s Life Advice Column

6-2008-04-dr-martin-luther-king-jrCould history’s greatest minds help you with your mundane daily problems? Perhaps not.

From 1957 to 1958, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. penned “Advice for the Living”, a feature for Ebony magazine in which he answered readers’ questions on everything from the atom bomb to capital punishment to dating and how to catch a nice young man. (Make sure you have the “radiating personality, a pleasant disposition, and that feminine charm
which every man admires.”)

King recommends playing gospel music rather than rock, as rock ‘n’ roll “so often plunges men’s minds into degrading and immoral depths”. He tells how to gain self confidence. His admirable strategy of love and passive resistance seems to function a bit strangely when put to use in situations such as when a friend hits you on the head with an iron pole.… Read the rest

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Murder in Memphis: Classic Out There Podcasts on MLK

Hey guys, I hope you enjoy this little nugget from my archive of past podcasts. 

Out There Radio: Episode 28 – Murder in Memphis

This episode is the first of two dealing with the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. In this first part, we deal with the events leading up to the assassination, including FBI surveillance and harrassment of Dr. King. Included in this episode is Dr. King’s “Beyond Vietnam” speech, in its entirety, recorded on April 4, 1967 (one year to the day before he was murdered).

Out There Radio: Episode 29 – Murder in Memphis, pt. 2

This episode is the second of two dealing with the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. This episode features a short discussion about the Military Commissions Act of 2006, followed by the second part of our look at the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr.… Read the rest

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MLK On Being Maladjusted

On his blog, Juan Cole highlights a speech that Martin Luther King Jr. gave at Western Michigan University on December 18, 1963, in which he extolled the virtues of being a misfit. It rings truer than ever in 2010:

Modern psychology has a word…”maladjusted.” Certainly, we all want to avoid the maladjusted life. In order to have real adjustment within our personalities, we all want the well-adjusted life in order to avoid neurosis, schizophrenic personalities.

But I say to you, my friends, as I move to my conclusion, there are certain things in our nation and in the world which I am proud to be maladjusted and which I hope all men of good-will will be maladjusted until the good societies realize. I say very honestly that I never intend to become adjusted to segregation and discrimination.

I never intend to become adjusted to religious bigotry.

I never intend to adjust myself to economic conditions that will take necessities from the many to give luxuries to the few.

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