Tag Archives | MDMA

This Year’s Halloween Scare Tactic — Ecstasy For the Kiddies

As Disinfonauts have already noted recently, Halloween is a time of dread, fear, and danger. For the precious children, that is.

This year is no different. Well, it’s a little different. This year’s villainous blackguards are giving Ecstasy to your precious dumplings.

I want some Ecstasy. Can I have the skully bit?

I want some Ecstasy. Can I have the skully bit?

The Free Thought Project calls out this nonsense for what it is:

Halloween looms on the horizon like a rising Harvest Moon, and with its approach comes the perennial onslaught of scare stories about drug fiends trying to poison “The Children.”

The Jackson, Mississippi Police Department was one of many that used their Facebook page to disseminate a warning about Ecstasy pills that were deviously disguised to look like children’s candy. The message contained a photo of what appeared to be an assortment of what appeared to be Pez-style hard candies in various shapes and colors.

“If your kids get these for Halloween candy, they ARE NOT CANDY!!!”bellowed the Facebook post, which was composed by someone dangerously addicted to punctuation marks.

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The Therapeutic Power Of MDMA w/ Dr. Ben Sessa ~ ATTMind Radio Ep. 10

headshot ben sessa w textDr. Ben Sessa is a leader in the field of Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy (particularly MDMA) in the UK. Specializing in psychiatry, child psychiatry, and pharmacology, he’s been using his medical degree to research psychedelics for the last 10 years.

Join us in this episode as we go into the current face of psychedelics in academia, the life cycle of childhood trauma to PTSD, the potential of psychedelics to treat PTSD, as well as the neurophysiological mechanisms and potentials of not only MDMA but also LSD, Psilocybin, and Ketamine.

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Can Ecstasy Replace Xanax?

“Is America ready to embrace Molly?” asks Dr. Jay Michaelson at Daily Beast, suggesting that it could follow the path of rapid mainstream acceptance that we’ve recently seen with marijuana:

In 1980, “Ecstasy” was “Empathy.”


That was one of the original street names for MDMA, now better known as Molly, and it speaks volumes about what the drug actually does: by increasing the amount of serotonin in the bloodstream, it acts like a turbo-charged SSRI (the leading form of antidepressant). Sure, it makes you feel happy—but equally important to its devotees, it makes you feel open.


Now, science is catching up. A study published this week in the journal Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry is part of a spate of research arguing that MDMA could have psychotherapeutic benefits: this time, to treat symptoms of social anxiety, particularly in autistic adults.

To longtime friends of Molly, this is about as revelatory as learning that a gin and tonic can relieve social anxiety.

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DEA approves study using MDMA for anxiety in seriously ill patients

Henry Riley (CC BY 2.0)

Henry Riley (CC BY 2.0)

Amid growing support for the therapeutic use of psychedelics, the DEA has approved a clinical trial that uses MDMA to treat anxiety.

Renee Lewis has the story at Al Jazeera:

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has approved the first clinical trial using MDMA along with psychotherapy to treat anxiety among people with life-threatening illnesses, researchers told Al Jazeera on Tuesday, adding that public support for the therapeutic use of psychedelic drugs is rapidly growing.

“The tide has changed for psychedelic research,” said Brad Burge, the communications director for the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), a California-based nonprofit research group that studies medicinal uses for psychedelics and marijuana and is sponsoring the study. The DEA approved the project on Friday, he said.

Unlike Ecstasy or Molly — names for MDMA sold on the street and often mixed with dangerous adulterants — pure MDMA has been proved “sufficiently safe” when taken a limited number of times in moderate doses, MAPS says on its website.

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Why I Don’t Do Psychedelics Very Often Anymore

sunwaves1Hey Disinfonauts, I think I’ve mentioned this before, but everyone should absolutely check out this Divine Spark book that Graham Hancock just put out. It’s a great roundup of essays exploring the mind’s limitless imaginal potentiality as presented to us by the psychedelic experience (I’m pretty sure that sentence makes sense). The fact that psychedelic research is finally gaining more mainstream acceptance is, much like marijuana legalization, not something I ever thought I’d see in my lifetime. Back in my early 20’s I got popped for acid possession and was scoffed at for wanting to study these things as a psychology student. As bleak and out of touch as the world can seem at times, there are some deliciously weird things afoot. Let us never lose sight of that, or harp on the fact that this essay already appeared on the site a few years back. Is there ever a bad time to re-read through my stuff (or to read my book which you can grab super cheap)?… Read the rest

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Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) on Reddit

Screen shot 2015-02-12 at 11.42.01 AM

The folks at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) did a Reddit AMA yesterday. I’ve curated some of the more informative questions and answers, but you can read the entire thread here.

MAPS introduces themselves with this lengthy but informative opening:

We are the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), and we are here to educate the public about research into the risks and benefits of psychedelics and marijuana. MAPS is a 501(c)(3) non-profit research and educational organization founded in 1986 that develops medical, legal, and cultural contexts for people to benefit from the careful uses of psychedelics and marijuana.

We envision a world where psychedelics and marijuana are safely and legally available for beneficial uses, and where research is governed by rigorous scientific evaluation of their risks and benefits.

Some of the topics we’re passionate about include;

  • Research into the therapeutic potential of MDMA, LSD, psilocybin, ayahuasca, ibogaine, and marijuana
  • Integrating psychedelics and marijuana into science, medicine, therapy, culture, spirituality, and policy
  • Providing harm reduction and education services at large-scale events to help reduce the risks associated with the non-medical use of various drugs
  • Ways to communicate with friends, family, and the public about the risks and benefits of psychedelics and marijuana
  • Our vision for a post-prohibition world
  • Developing psychedelics and marijuana into prescription medicines through FDA-approved clinical research

List of participants:

  • Rick Doblin, Ph.D., Founder and Executive Director, MAPS
  • Brad Burge, Director of Communications and Marketing, MAPS
  • Amy Emerson, Executive Director and Director of Clinical Research, MAPS Public Benefit Corporation
  • Virginia Wright, Director of Development, MAPS
  • Brian Brown, Communications and Marketing Associate, MAPS
  • Sara Gael, Harm Reduction Coordinator, MAPS
  • Natalie Lyla Ginsberg, Research and Advocacy Coordinator, MAPS
  • Tess Goodwin, Development Assistant, MAPS
  • Ilsa Jerome, Ph.D., Research and Information Specialist, MAPS Public Benefit Corporation
  • Sarah Jordan, Publications Associate, MAPS
  • Bryce Montgomery, Web and Multimedia Associate, MAPS
  • Shannon Clare Petitt, Executive Assistant, MAPS
  • Linnae Ponté, Director of Harm Reduction, MAPS
  • Ben Shechet, Clinical Research Associate, MAPS Public Benefit Corporation
  • Allison Wilens, Clinical Study Assistant, MAPS Public Benefit Corporation
  • Berra Yazar-Klosinski, Ph.D., Clinical Research Scientist, MAPS

For more information about scientific research into the medical potential of psychedelics and marijuana, visitmaps.org.

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Here’s What Your Eyes Look Like When You Take Different Drugs

via Vice:

Eyes are the window to your soul, and that doesn’t stop being true no matter how many illegal substances you consume on a night out. But can your eyes really tell when you’re actually on something? From pupils the size of a needlepoint to huge black holes with barely visible irises, we snapped our way through Berlin’s nightclubs to see if people’s eyeballs could tell us the night’s story. How much does the size of your pupils actually have to do with the substances you’ve taken?

The stuff in drugs that makes you relaxed, happy or just really awake not only manipulates the neurotransmitters in your brain, but can also affect physiological processes in your body. This includes the muscles in your eyes that are responsible for making your pupils bigger (to let in more light, for example), or smaller.




To see more eyes and read more, go here: http://www.vice.com/read/can-you-tell-what-drugs-someones-on-just-by-looking-at-their-eyes-876

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Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy and the Power to Heal

Shroder_Tom_AcidTest_cover_expandedAttitudes towards the healing powers of psychedelics seem to be changing, says Tom Shroder, the author of a new book on the subject. And, according to some researchers, their incredible efficacy is due to their ability to unleash the mind’s own “innate healing intelligence”.

The award winning journalist and ex-editor of The Washington Post Magazine spoke to The Eternities podcast about his latest work, Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy and the Power to Heal, which looks at the history of psychedelic therapy from the fifties to the present day.

He said, “Our system, as biased as it might have been against psychedelics, certainly was based on [a] belief that science could prove something, and science [has been] proving the efficacy of these drugs … in clinical conditions. They’re plenty safe enough. In fact, they’re much safer than most other drugs used in psychiatry. So, you can’t argue with the science.”

One of the three main figures in the book is Dr Michael Mithoefer, a psychiatrist at the forefront of psychedelic therapy research.… Read the rest

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Why Psychedelics Are So Important To Veterans

Psychedelic dingbats.png

By Hendrike (CC)

Tom Shroder, author of Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy, and the Power to Heal, tells the story of Nick, a veteran haunted by PTSD in an interview with The Daily Beast in which he relates why psychedelics are so important to veterans, and the roadblocks researchers face getting it to them:

LSD, an illicit drug with a serious stigma, was once the darling of the psychotherapy world.

Synthesized by Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann in 1938, the two decades following its birth were populated with study after study showing positive effects. With its ability to reduce defensiveness, help users relive early experiences, and make unconscious material accessible, it proved tremendously successful in therapy.

In a plethora of studies from the 1950s, researchers found the drug, and other psychedelics in its family, to be successful in treating victims of psychosomatic illnesses ranging from depression to addiction. With fear and hesitation stripped away, psychologists could help their patients dive headfirst into a painful memory, feeling, or thought, and work through it.

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