Tag Archives | meat

Creepy cloaked figure photographed dropping meat near playground

Why?

Why?

A creepy cloaked figure was photographed outside of an apartment complex in Gastonia, North Carolina. Witnesses claimed that the figure was seen dropping meat near a playground. Police are currently investigating.

Chris Dyches via WBTV:

According to online posts, the mysterious pale figure “sparked fear among locals after it was reportedly caught on camera standing outside an apartment complex in Gastonia, North Carolina, dressed in a dark cloak.”

Police spokesperson Donna Lahser told WBTV that investigators were called out to meet with the manager of the Hudson Woods Apartment complex last Monday about the photo.

h/t Boing Boing.

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Ahimsa for All the Cecil-the-Lions of the World

This post originally appeared on Consciousness is Everything.

The Cecil the Lion issue happening in the news has had a predictably polarizing effect. Here’s what this swami thinks. Below I quote a Facebook friend who prompted me to address the issue:

I don’t understand the desire to kill an animal for sport. It’s not an accomplishment; you’ve got a gun.

cecil3
My response:

I understand it. I disapprove, but I understand. As a kid with a bb gun, a logical leap (even if based on poor logic) of testing my skills was shooting birds. The first time I ever shot a bird, it was a robin. When I had hit it, I ran up to it and picked it up. Seeing and feeling this other creature die in my hands because of me, my stomach sank and I knew everything about it was wrong. But I also had this conflicting sense of urgency to hone hunting and survival skills; for what reason I don’t know.… Read the rest

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The Future Will Be Full of Lab Grown Meat

Here’s another one of those lab-grown meat boosting articles, this time from Gizmodo. I think I’ll stick to tofu.

In 2013, the world’s first lab-grown burger was unveiled to the world. It carried a $330,000 price tag, and apparently, it wasn’t all that tasty. But the scientists behind the idea have been hard at work, and artificial meat that’s both cost-effective and palatable may arrive sooner than we think.

Meat-grinder-30701283801918LoLK

It’s not just cow-free beef burgers on the future menu — several groups around the world are attempting to clone chicken breasts and fish fillets, as well. Why do scientists want to grow meat in vats instead of on animals, and how close are we to actually accomplishing it?

The Big Resource Hog

The arguments for growing so-called ‘cultured’ meat are as wide-ranging as the reasons people decide to become vegetarian or vegan. If you’re not vegetarian or vegan, you’ve probably received a mouthful on this subject from a friend or family member before, so I’m going to keep it brief and focus on the argument cultured meat proponents seem to embrace the most: Sustainability.

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The Mystery of the Kentucky Meat Shower

No, not the third installment of the Magic Mike Trilogy, but something weirder and more wondrous than Channing Tatum’s butt gyrations.

meat

Shower Meat- it’s what’s for dinner. If you’re starving. Or Kentuckian.

Let’s cut the chatter and get right to the- uh- meat of the matter:

According to Today I Found Out,

On March 3, 1876, one Mrs. Crouch was working in her yard in Bath County, Kentucky, making soap, when suddenly “meat which looked like beef began to fall all around her. The sky was perfectly clear at the time.” Falling like large snowflakes and settling all around the 5000 square foot yard, pieces of flesh ranging in size from about two inches square to four, dotted the ground and were even stuck on the fences. When it first appeared, the meat was said to be fresh, and, accordingly, two unidentified (but brave) men even sampled it.

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On the Menu in California: Lion Burgers, Beaver Curry and More

If it moves, Anshu Pathak has probably sold it, writes Elina Shatkin for the California Sunday Magazine. She’s not kidding, he even boasts of selling a lion’s penis for $5,000:

When Anshu Pathak welcomes you into his kingdom, you can count on food being served. It might be wedges of peppery cheddar cheese with romanesco florets and black tahini. It might be beaver curry, barbecued guinea pig, or a wagyu steak as thick as an encyclopedia. The first time I visited his office, in a drab corner of a squat, sunbaked business park 70 miles east of Los Angeles, it was lion burgers.

Promotional t-shirt sold by Exotic Meat Market

Promotional t-shirt sold by Exotic Meat Market

 

Beef patties shrink as they sizzle on the grill, losing up to a quarter of their weight. Lion meat, pale pink and dotted with little white globules of fat, fluffs up when you cook it. I had expected a bold flavor and a tough texture, but it was mild, not at all gamy.

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Vegan diet best for planet

Mikhail Esteves (CC BY 2.0)

Mikhail Esteves (CC BY 2.0)

Lydia Wheeler Via The Hill:

A federal panel that helps set federal dietary guidelines is recommending Americans eat less meat because it’s better for the environment, sparking outrage from industry groups representing the nation’s purveyors of beef, pork and poultry.

The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, a federally appointed panel of nutritionists created in 1983, decided for the first time this year to factor in environmental sustainability in its recommendations. They include a finding that a diet lower in animal-based foods is not only healthier, but has less of an environmental impact.

The meat industry is lashing back, contending the panel has neither the authority nor the expertise to make such a judgment.

“When you talk about the lens of the dietary guidelines it’s just not appropriate for the advisory committee to enter that conversation when they were asked to look at nutrition and health science,” said Kristina Butts, executive director of legislative affairs for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.

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The Top-Secret Food That Will Change the Way You Eat

Welcome to Planeat, where your meat comes from plants. Outside‘s Rowan Jacobsen tells the story of Beyond Meat’s burgers, “More protein than beef. More omegas than salmon. Tons of calcium, antioxidants, and vitamin B… the juicy flavor and texture of the real thing with none of the dietary and environmental downsides”:

I dumped meat a few weeks ago, and it was not an easy breakup. Some of my most treasured moments have involved a deck, a beer, and a cheeseburger. But the more I learned, the more I understood that the relationship wasn’t good for either of us. A few things you should never do if you want to eat factory meat in unconflicted bliss: write a story on water scarcity in the American Southwest; Google “How much shit is in my hamburger?”; watch an undercover video of a slaughterhouse in action; and read the 2009 Worldwatch Institute report “Livestock and Climate Change.”

beast burger

I did them all.

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TB Bacteria May Have Once Helped Break Down Nutrients Needed For Bigger Brains

Sputum sample containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Sputum sample containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Talk about unforeseen consequences: A group of scientists think that tuberculosis started out as a symbiotic bacteria that extracted food nutrients  needed to grow bigger, more powerful brains. Scientific American has an article on the study, but it’s behind a pay wall. I’ve just pulled the abstract from the study they cited, and can remember just enough from my neurological psychology classes to sort of piece it together. Interesting stuff. (Note: The paragraph breaks are my own. I have trouble absorbing information what I read when it’s presented in a giant block of text.)

Meat eating has been an important trigger for human evolution however the responsible component in meat has not been clearly identified. Here we propose that the limiting factors for expanding brains and increasing longevity were the micronutrient nicotinamide (vitamin B3) and the metabolically related essential amino-acid, tryptophan.

Meat offers significant sourcing challenges and lack causes a deficiency of nicotinamide and tryptophan and consequently the energy carrier nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) that gets consumed in regulatory circuits important for survival, resulting in premature ageing, poor cognition and brain atrophy.

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The American Meat Industry Does Some Very Impressive and Terrifying Things

MeatDo you eat meat every day? Then you’re part of the problem. Cyrus Nemati explains at the Chicago Sun Times:

In the past 60 years, the United States has fallen deeply in love with meat. What was once a treat is now expected at every meal to the point where we can get it in a tube. The demand for meat has increased dramatically, and the largest meat companies have found ways to fulfill that demand cheaply. It’s not a surprise that the path to the six cent Chicken McNugget was built at the expense of not only the chickens themselves, but farmers and smaller meat plants. The quest for cheap meat has resulted in a ruthless market that has left 85 percent of supply in the hands of five companies.

This oligopoly has driven the meat industry to do some very impressive and terrifying things. We raise nine billion animals for the slaughter a year.

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Nicholas Kristof’s ‘Mass Meat’ Scandal Story

Lots of meatNicholas Kristof, New York Times columnist, has discovered something that many of us have known for years: Tyson Foods and other agribusiness giants are doing some very, very bad things involving animal husbandry and meat production:

Where does our food come from? Often the answer is Tyson Foods, America’s meat factory.

Tyson, one of the nation’s 100 biggest companiesslaughters 135,000 head of cattle a week, along with 391,000 hogs and an astonishing 41 million chickens. Nearly all Americans regularly eat Tyson meat — at home, at McDonalds, at a cafeteria, at a nursing home.

“Even if Tyson did not produce a given piece of meat, the consumer is really only picking between different versions of the same commoditized beef, chicken, and pork that is produced through a system Tyson pioneered,” says Christopher Leonard, a longtime agribusiness journalist, in his new book about Tyson called “The Meat Racket.”…

…This industrial agriculture system also has imposed enormous costs of three kinds.

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