medical research


I’m getting ready to go to the bank and cash my check and have so many hundred dollar bills that I won’t be able to close my wallet. So what have a…



The “new AIDS” is one scary headline. Marilynn Marchione reports for AP via Yahoo News: Researchers have identified a mysterious new disease that has left scores of people in Asia and some…



The fact that the United States government has experimented with new drugs on military recruits is well known, but the fact that it has consistently failed to take care of the damaged patients should be causing outrage. David S. Martin reports for CNN:

The moment 18-year-old Army Pvt. Tim Josephs arrived at Edgewood Arsenal in 1968, he knew there was something different about the place.

“It just did not look like a military base, more like a hospital,” recalled Josephs, a Pittsburgh native. Josephs had volunteered for a two-month assignment at Edgewood, in Maryland, lured by three-day weekends closer to home.

“It was like a plum assignment,” Josephs said. “The idea was they would test new Army field jackets, clothing, weapons and things of that nature, but no mention of drugs or chemicals.”…




Shirley S. Wang reports on the increasing clinical use of placebos for the Wall Street Journal: Say “placebo effect” and most people think of the boost they may get from a sugar…


800px-Back-decompressionPopping pain killers may not be the answer, not if you can isolate and alter the gene which regulates chronic pain. Via Reuters:

British scientists have identified a gene responsible for regulating chronic pain, called HCN2, and say their discovery should help drug researchers in their search for more effective, targeted pain-killing medicines.

“Our research lays the groundwork for the development of new drugs to treat chronic pain by blocking HCN2.”

Scientists from Cambridge University said that if drugs could be designed to block the protein produced by the gene, they could treat a type of pain known as neuropathic pain, which is linked to nerve damage and often very difficult to control with currently available drugs.

“Individuals suffering from neuropathic pain often have little or no respite because of the lack of effective medications,” said Peter McNaughton of Cambridge’s pharmacology department, who led the study.



Maureen Langlois reports on the amazing healing powers of dolphins, for NPR: Dr. Michael Zasloff, a surgeon and researcher at Georgetown University, is famous for discovering compounds in the skin of frogs…


Here’s a great real world example of why math is important kids! From the Wall Street Journal:

Scientists using a powerful mathematical tool previously applied to the stock market have identified an Achilles heel in HIV that could be a prime target for AIDS vaccines or drugs.

The research adds weight to a provocative hypothesis—that an HIV vaccine should avoid a broadside attack and instead home in on a few targets…