Memes




Philip H. Farber is the founder of a system of magical practice that synthesizes elements of magick, neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) and hypnosis to create a “magick about magick,” or Meta-Magick. His book…





In their ongoing manhunt for Christopher Dorner, the former LAPD officer gone murderously rogue, Los Angeles police have twice opened fire on innocent people without warning or reason. Last week, cops shot a woman and her elderly mother driving in a car mistaken for Dorner’s (although both the license plate and the color of the vehicle were wrong). Police later let loose a hail of bullets on a man driving a pickup truck believed to be Dorner’s (although, again, the vehicle make and color didn’t match). In response, Buzzfeed notes, a local meme has been created by people hoping not to be blown away by L.A.’s finest:







Nearly 70 million people have watched Kony 2012, but almost none of them have been Ugandans, since internet access in their country is spotty. Thus a charity held a public screening so that actual victims of the civil strife could see the video. The reaction? Extremely negative, as the viewing began with eager anticipation and culminated with people hurling rocks at the screen in disgust over the video’s self-congratulatory nature, its focus on a white American and his young son, and its perceived use of Ugandans as props in a promotional campaign for Invisible Children:





Is this the first case of government repression to stamp out a meme? First they came for the plankers, then the owl-ers and cone-ers. From the Washington Post: There’s some serious weight…



International Business Times reports: Move aside, Chuck Norris, Ron Paul Facts is now in. Ron Paul, a Texas Congressman and 2012 presidential hopeful, has inspired a fiercely loyal following around the country…




Culture-jamming or internet prank? Decide for yourself: call it “bullshit” or “it’s really f-d up” in the comments below.

WTFMany news outlets are confused exactly what is the point of this video (deal with the ’80s Nintendo video game sounds at your own risk).

I have tried to figure what the hell this is about, the site Know Your Meme did an exemplar job of why the internet media is even talking about this now, and Matt Zoller Setiz on Salon made a good connection where some of the video was sourced from: