Tag Archives | Mental Health

The male suicides: how social perfectionism kills

Hartwig HKD (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Hartwig HKD (CC BY-ND 2.0)

In every country in the world, male suicides outnumber female. Will Storr asks why. 

Finally, Drummond had everything he’d ever dreamed of. He’d come a long way since he was a little boy, upset at his failure to get into the grammar school. That had been a great disappointment to his mother, and to his father, who was an engineer at a pharmaceutical company. His dad had never showed much interest in him as a child. He didn’t play with him and when he was naughty, he’d put him over the back of a chair and wallop him. That’s just the way men were in those days. Your father was feared and respected. Dads were dads.

It was difficult, seeing the grammar boys pass by the house in their smart caps, every morning. Drummond had always dreamed of becoming a headteacher in a little school in a perfect village when he grew up, but he was only able to get a place at the technical school learning woodwork and bricklaying.… Read the rest

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Confronting Western Views of Mental Wellness and Mental Illness

Dr. John Read, PhD, at the recent ISEPP (Intl. Society for Ethical Psychology and Psychiatry) Conference in Los Angeles, worked for nearly 20 years as a clinical psychologist and manager of mental health services in the UK and USA before joining the University of Auckland (New Zealand) in 1994. While there he published over 100 papers primarily on the relationship between adverse life events and psychosis. In February 2015, Dr. Read took up the post of Professor of Clinical Psychology at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne. He’s on the Executive Committee of the International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis and editor of ISPS’s scientific journal Psychosis. John has co-authored or co-edited 3 books and is also the editor of the widely esteemed book, “Models of Madness: Psychological, Social and Biological Approaches to Schizophrenia” (Routledge, 2004) which has sold over 10,000 copies.

This interview clip is for a film called Crazywise, a documentary that confronts western cultural views of mental wellness and mental illness with ones from elsewhere in the world.

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Malformed: Forgotten Brains of the Texas State Mental Hospital

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Malformed:Forgotten Brains of the Texas State Mental Hospitaljust released in December, documents an obscure piece of history: the “Battle for the Brains” with stunning photography.

Hidden away out of sight in a forgotten storage closet deep within the bowels of the University of Texas State Mental Hospital languished a forgotten, but unique and exceptional, collection of 100 extremely rare, malformed, or damaged human brains preserved in jars of formaldehyde.

Decades later, in 2011, photographer Adam Voorhes discovered the brains and became obsessed with documenting them in close-up, high-resolution, large format photographs, revealing their oddities, textures, and otherworldly essence. Voorhes donned a respirator and chemical gloves, and began the painstaking process of photographing the collection. Desperate to know more about the provenance of the brains, Voorhes, together with journalist Alex Hannaford, traveled down the rabbit hole of the collection’s history.

Sifting through a century’s worth of university documents, the truth-seekers discovered that rival universities had bitterly fought over the collection.

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Depression Distorts People’s Perception of Time, Study Finds

oatsy40 (CC BY 2.0)

oatsy40 (CC BY 2.0)

Depression can lead to time distortion.

via PsyBlog:

Most people experience differences in how time is perceived, with or without depression.

For example, 10 minutes in the dentist’s waiting-room can seem like an hour.

While an enjoyable conversation with a good friend can pass in the blink of an eye.

What a new study finds, though, is that depressed people have a general feeling that time is passing more slowly, or even that it has stopped.

Dr. Daniel Oberfeld-Twistel, one of the study’s authors, said:

“Psychiatrists and psychologists in hospitals and private practices repeatedly report that depressed patients feel that time only creeps forward slowly or is passing in slow motion.

The results of our analysis confirm that this is indeed the case.”

The strange part is what happens when people with depression are asked to judge intervals of time.

For example, they are asked to watch a movie and estimate its length.

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Loneliness and Social Isolation Are Just as Much a Threat to Longevity as Obesity

via Brigham Young University:

Ask people what it takes to live a long life, and they’ll say things like exercise, take Omega-3s, and see your doctor regularly.

Now research from Brigham Young University shows that loneliness and social isolation are just as much a threat to longevity as obesity.

“The effect of this is comparable to obesity, something that public health takes very seriously,” said Julianne Holt-Lunstad, the lead study author. “We need to start taking our social relationships more seriously.”

Loneliness and social isolation can look very different. For example, someone may be surrounded by many people but still feel alone. Other people may isolate themselves because they prefer to be alone. The effect on longevity, however, is much the same for those two scenarios.

The association between loneliness and risk for mortality among young populations is  actually greater than among older populations. Although older people are more likely to be lonely and face a higher mortality risk, loneliness and social isolation better predict premature death among populations younger than 65 years.

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Psychedelic Drug Use ‘Does Not Increase Risk for Mental Health Problems’

Don’t worry acidheads, tripping won’t give you mental problems (in fact it might actually reduce them), per this report at MNT:

An analysis of data provided by 135,000 randomly selected participants – including 19,000 people who had used drugs such as LSD and magic mushrooms – finds that use of psychedelics does not increase risk of developing mental health problems. The results are published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.
Pink Elephants on Parade Blotter LSD Dumbo.jpg

Pink Elephants on Parade Blotter LSD Dumbo by Psychonaught

 

Psychedelics, such as LSD and magic mushrooms, do not increase risk of developing mental health problems, according to the new study.

Previously, the researchers behind the study – from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim – had conducted a population study investigating associations between mental health and psychedelic use. However, that study, which looked at data from 2001-04, was unable to find a link between use of these drugs and mental health problems.

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Daily diary reveals how cannabis use affects people with bipolar

Experiences in real-time. Rafael-castillo, CC BY

Experiences in real-time. Rafael-castillo, CC BY

By Elizabeth Tyler, Lancaster University

Rates of substance use are higher in people with mental health problems compared to the general population and particularly in people with bipolar disorder, with cannabis the street drug most frequently used. Estimates suggest that up to 64% of this group have tried cannabis at least once in their lives, against about 30% of those without the disorder, despite only being about 2% of the overall population.

Specific reasons for the high levels of cannabis use in bipolar disorder are not yet fully understood. Retrospective studies (using case histories and qualitative interviews) suggest that individuals see cannabis as sometimes useful for managing symptoms of mania and depression. However, a number of large scale research studies have found that cannabis use is associated with significantly more manic and depressive episodes.

The daily experience

A study we published in PLOS ONE is the first to explore the use of cannabis in bipolar disorder in daily life.… Read the rest

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“Raping the Gods” Examines the Question: Is Sex Addiction Real?

71dlVRUUuSL._SL1315_Although author Brian Whitney is, without a doubt, a sex addict, he doesn’t like the term.

“I hate it when people call me an addict. Some people think sex addiction doesn’t exist, that it is just a made-up term to excuse bad behavior. Another group thinks that a sex addict is a crazy, out-of-control freak who thinks of nothing but getting laid every second of every day. Then there is a third group that thinks it sounds fun: ‘What are you complaining about, man? You get laid all the time and you think it’s a problem?’”

“I could tell a lot of stories about what I was doing, but I’d rather just say I was really fucked up. My major issue was infidelity. I was often involved in three or four different relationships at once. I got an enormous rush from having multiple sexual partners and lying to all of them.… Read the rest

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Criminologist’s study shows lack of mental health care for prisoners

[AndreasS] (CC BY 2.0)

[AndreasS] (CC BY 2.0)

via ScienceDaily:

New research by a UT Dallas criminologist has found that a substantial number of prison inmates have not received treatment for mental health conditions.

Dr. Nadine M. Connell, assistant professor of criminology in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences (EPPS), analyzed data from 18,185 inmates in state and federal correctional facilities for the study, published in the American Journal of Public Health. Connell worked with co-author Dr. Jennifer M. Reingle Gonzalez, an assistant professor at The University of Texas School of Public Health in Dallas.

Their findings include:

  • 1 in 4 prisoners had been diagnosed with a mental health condition in their lifetime.
  • Fewer than 1 in 5 of those inmates were taking medication for their conditions when they were admitted.
  • Of those, fewer than half of the inmates who reported taking medication at intake were receiving medication for their conditions in prison.
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