Mind




Look at the cosmos as a pool where the greatest depths are the most inclusive. Look at the cosmos as expanded dimensions of consciousness and existence. As we move closer to the surface,…


Former neuroscientist Sharon Darwish believes that neuroscientists can already read minds, which is a bit of a stretch IMO, but here’s her reasoning at the Guardian: As a former neuroscientist, a question…








 Princeton Engineering Anomalies ResearchPresenting a much-needed Kickstarter to save the Twin Peaks-esque headquarters of the Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research (PEAR) program.

PEAR ran fascinating experiments using strange and fantastic devices with the goal of detecting collective consciousness and the physical manifestation of mental projection:

Operated at Princeton University from 1979 to 2007, PEAR is internationally renowned for its studies of human/machine anomalies and the role of consciousness in the construction of physical reality. Its legacy is now being carried forward by International Consciousness Research Laboratories (ICRL), a not-for-profit organization, which will house the proposed museum in its Princeton, NJ, headquarters.

Designed to study the potential vulnerability of engineering devices and information processing systems to the anomalous influence of the consciousness of their human operators, machines that will be in this exhibit were based on some form of random physical noise that produced a statistical output distribution, which was automatically recorded on hard copy and in a computer file.



Via Utne Reader, Jennifer Dumpert explains oneirogens, substances taken for dream enhancement and manipulation: • Mugwort: Promotes lucid dreams, “astral travel,” and visionary dreams. Contains thujone, the most active ingredient in absinthe….










Via Gizmodo, you can now truly see someone thinking:

A team of Japanese researchers has captured, for the first time ever, a movie which shows how thoughts form in the brain. OK, so it’s a thought forming in the brain of a zebrafish. But this is a fundamental leap forward in our understanding of how brains work.

The researchers used a new technique to record the footage: a super-sensitive fluorescent probe that detects neuron activity. We see neurons glowing when they’re active—and the cascade of light you see in this video is the neuronal response of a zebrafish responding to the presence of its prey.


After serving in the Korean War, working at United Nations, and establishing a career as an artist, Ingo Swann devoted himself to cultivating super-sensory powers and attempting to prove their legitimacy. Remote…


British neuropsychiatrist Peter Fenwick researches how consciousness changes as we approach death. In this TEDx talk, he explores the altered states on the edge of death and explains how to engage in a peaceful and satisfying end to earthly existence: