Tag Archives | Mondo 2000

Tech Time Warp of the Week: Before WIRED, There Was the Eccentric Mondo 2000

mondologo

One friend of disinformation, Klint “Klintron” Finley who writes for a legendary tech mag (Wired) writes about another, Ken “RU Sirius” Goffman, the editor of its precursor, Mondo 2000:

When WIRED launched in 1993, few people had seen anything like it. Unlike other computer magazines, it focused on people instead of machines. It was colorful—psychedelic even—at a time when computers were beige boxes made by and for the sort of people that Dilbert was about. But WIRED wasn’t totally alone.

Before WIRED, there was Mondo 2000, a magazine that fused counterculture and technology together into a surreal glossy magazine that first appeared on newsstands in 1989. A typical issue would cover everything from DIY micro-satellites to smart drugs to weird bands like The Residents.

“Mondo 2000 is here to cover the leading edge in hyperculture,” an introduction by editor Ken “R.U. Sirius” Goffman and publisher Allison “Queen Mu” Kennedy announced in the first issue.

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Cypherpunk Pioneers Warn of a “Coming Surveillance Dystopia”

Twenty years of cypherpunk* get mixed reviews in this article by the former editor of Mondo 2000 (the pre-web technology magazine which William Gibson remembers as “a focus of something that was happening”). The editor describes the 1992 conversation in which Jude Milhon first coined the term cypherpunk, and how Julian Assange posted his first words on the Cypherpunk mailing list in 1995 — “I am annoyed…”

But nearly 20 years later, contemporary cypherpunk now finds itself on the verge of what Assange calls “a postmodern surveillance dystopia, from which escape for all but the most skilled individuals will be impossible.” On the one hand, EFF co-founder John Gilmore argues today that cypherpunk “did reshape the world” by freeing encryption from government control, while threat analyst Adrian Lamo warns that “The biggest threat to our privacy is our own limited understanding of how little privacy we truly have.”

Last September the ACLU even warned that “federal law enforcement agencies are increasingly monitoring Americans’ electronic communications, and doing so without warrants, sufficient oversight, or meaningful accountability.” And this article even notes that for $10 million, one South African company “will sell you a turnkey system that can intercept all communications in a middle-sized country!”

*Wikipedia article on cypherpunk.… Read the rest

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