Tag Archives | Movies

Help Dario Argento Make A Movie Starring Iggy Pop

Two venerable icons of counterculture, Dario Argento and Iggy Pop want to make a movie together and they’re crowd funding it at Indiegogo:

THE_SANDMAN_POSTERHere’s the pitch:

Friends! Romans! Countrymen –– lend us your… eyes — while you still have them, that is — and look over our Indiegogo campaign, to ensure that The Maestro (of Terror), Dario Argento, and The Godfather (of Punk) Iggy Pop have free reign to make this next horror film a true masterpiece for the ages!

Beware The Sandman!

Maybe other places, you’ve heard about other kinds of Sandmen — forget everything you’ve heard. This guy doesn’t put sand in your eyes so you drift peacefully to sleep — don’t you wish! This Sandman is the real deal, going back to the dark, original German legend: the REAL Sandman was someone who stole the eyes of any children that wouldn’t just close them and go to sleep… then he’d go feed them to his hungry children on the moon.… Read the rest

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What Movies Are You Watching This Weekend?

Still from The Zero Theorem.

Still from The Zero Theorem.

Do any of you Disinfonauts have movie plans for the weekend? Two films I’ve been highly anticipating are opening tonight: The Zero Theorem by Terry Gilliam and Tusk by Kevin Smith. Though, I’m not sure if I’m going to be able to get to a theater in the next few days. I did, however, finally finish reading The Trial by Franz Kafka and am hoping to find some time to watch Orson Welles’ version on Netflix. Do you have anything you want to check off your Netflix queue? Or any recommendations for me to add to mine?

I did catch As Above, So Below a couple of weeks ago. I’m probably one of the only people left who still has hope for the found footage subgenre, but I usually end up disappointed. As Above, So Below’s storyline had a lot of potential as Paris’ catacombs are fascinating, and I was excited to see how the filmmakers would utilize them.… Read the rest

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John Alan Simon Discusses His Movie of Philip K. Dick’s ‘Radio Free Albemuth’

The cerebral Adi Tantimedh interviews John Simon's concerning his movie adaption of Philip K. Dick's Radio Free Albemuth, at Bleeding Cool:
I first wrote about the movie version of Philip K. Dick’s Radio Free Albemuth last year when I came across its Kickstarter campaign to raise money to self-distribute in cinemas and saw it at a screening at Lincoln Center in New York. Since then, my estimation of the movie has risen in its resonance and relevance to the times. It’s opening in ten US cities this week and On Demand. I spoke to writer-director John Alan Simon recently about the movie. I was curious about the decision to film the book over Dick’s long list of other novels. “Ive had a close-to-lifelong interest in Philip K. Dick,” said Simon. “I read him in college and earmarked mentally two novels that I felt a real affinity to one day adapt and try to produce as feature films. One of them was Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said, the other was Radio Free Albemuth. At the time when we were initially talking to the agent for the estate, I didn’t really know the autobiographical aspect of Radio Free Albemuth. The novel had been published ten years after Philip K. Dick’s death, around 1985. It just wasn’t that well known yet about Dick’s actual visionary experiences with the entity that he called VALIS, or Vast Active Living Intelligent System, as he termed it in Radio Free Albemuth.”...
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My Brain has Melted- Author and High-Ranking Freemason Robert W. Sullivan Blasts a Torrent of Hidden Knowledge Into Your Ears.

OMG, THEY'RE TOTES WATCHING US RIGHT NOW

OMG, THEY’RE TOTES WATCHING US RIGHT NOW!

Author and 32nd degree Freemason, Robert W. Sullivan discusses the influence of ancient mysteries, ceremonies, sages and astral bodies on the very foundation of America.

I remember it well- the first time I heard the phrase “Freemason”.  Sure, in hindsight, it came from an uneducated idiot at a college party, but it was enough to make me rush to Google for enlightenment.  My 20-year-old brain couldn’t believe what it had read.  Masons seemed to be the stuff of fiction.  A shadowy cabal of powerful men linked to basically every major event that lead to the establishment of the United States.  It was well known- George Washington, Ben Franklin and and a slew of other founding fathers we worship were members of this secretive fraternal order shrouded in creepy symbols, weird phrases and secret handshakes.  How could I not have known this?  Then I came across the claims that masons were devil worshipers, prayed to idols and practiced black magic.
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Transcendence is Real

Transcendence2014PosterDo you believe in transcendence, about which Wikipedia says “In religious experience transcendence is a state of being that has overcome the limitations of physical existence and by some definitions has also become independent of it. This is typically manifested in prayer, séance, meditation, psychedelics and paranormal ‘visions'”?

Gearing up for tomorrow’s release of the Johnny Depp movie Transcendence, the Daily Dot claims that it ain’t just sci-fi, it’s “terrifyingly real”:

This Friday, a movie called Transcendence will arrive in theaters. Directed by Christopher Nolan’s go-to cinematographer, Wally Pfister, and penned by first-time screenwriter Jack Paglen (whose script appeared on the infamous Black List), Transcendence is being sold as Hollywood’s next sci-fi epic. So far, reviews haven’t been kind (although they’re still rolling in), and box office predictions have been tepid.

The movie follows Johnny Depp’s Dr. Caster’s journey from being fatally shot to uploading his mind into a supercomputer, where he achieves the all-knowing, all-powerful state he’s only dreamed about before.

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An Esoteric Take on The Big Lebowski

The Big Lebowski

More than a movie The Big Lebowski is the kind of miracle that, more rarely than occasionally, slips through the cracks of the Hollywood machinery. That’s because the Coen Brothers’ previous film, Fargo, earned seven Academy Nominations and won two, for best original screenplay and best actress in a leading role, Frances McDormand, incidentally Joel Coen’s wife. So, with a lot more clout behind them, the Coen Brothers embarked on their next project, The Big Lebowski, in which the leading role of the Dude is sublimely played by Jeff Bridges. The Dude, by the way, was inspired by a real man, Jeff Dowd, a publicist who helped the Coen Brothers in launching Blood Simple, their first film.

In the Dude we find the archetype of the slacker, i.e, according to the definition in the dictionary,  an educated young person who is antimaterialistic, purposeless, apathetic, and usually works in a dead-end job.… Read the rest

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Glenn Beck Developing ‘Edison vs. Tesla’ Movie

Nikola TeslaThe story of Thomas Edison taking all the glory while creative genius Nikola Tesla died alone and in poverty in the New Yorker Hotel room that was his final home certainly seems like a great premise for a movie, but can Glenn Beck be trusted to do it justice? Gizmodo gushes excitedly at the prospect:

Former Fox News TV personality Glenn Beck is really sick of talking about politics. So what rustles his jimmies these days? The mythologized feud between Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison. Beck even has a movie in production about Edison that he hopes will “expose the truth” about this “bad man.”

From National Review:

Another film will “expose the truth” about Thomas Edison, a villain Beck thinks has gotten a break from historians and whose real story demonstrates our flawed understanding of the 20th century. Though remembered as “this nice, kind of, good old Thomas,” Beck explains, “he was really a bad man who was electrocuting animals.” Edison,”was absolutely on the wrong end, and luckily for him the story ended happily with his name being taken off his own company and given to GE,” he says.

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Get Ready For The Mirage Men

MM-AD-336x280-preThe new movie Mirage Men‘s subtitle is: “How the US government created a myth that took over the world.” A promising topic for any disinfonaut, surely, but it really has some bona fides that make us recommend it to you.

Way back in the dark ages of the year 2,000 an insatiably curious and cool alternative journalist arrived in New York to cover an all-day marathon of counterculture called disinfo.con, featuring the likes of Robert Anton Wilson, Marilyn Manson, Grant Morrison and Kenneth Anger, among many, many others. His name was Mark Pilkington and he has gone on to write for numerous newspapers and magazines and has published several books including our own Far Out: 101 Strange Tales From Science’s Outer Edge. Mark’s been working on Mirage Men for years; nominally he’s the writer, but believe me he was an instrumental part of the team that made this film, and you should check it out.… Read the rest

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Almost Everything In ‘Dr. Strangelove’ Was True

Dr strangelove peter sellersRemember Eric Schlosser, the Fast Food Nation author? Well he’s also a great journalist and this week  in The New Yorker he takes a look at the command and control of nuclear weapons, positing that the nuclear craziness of the classic Peter Sellers movie Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb was actually pretty much true:

This month marks the fiftieth anniversary of Stanley Kubrick’s black comedy about nuclear weapons, “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.” Released on January 29, 1964, the film caused a good deal of controversy. Its plot suggested that a mentally deranged American general could order a nuclear attack on the Soviet Union, without consulting the President. One reviewer described the film as “dangerous … an evil thing about an evil thing.” Another compared it to Soviet propaganda. Although “Strangelove” was clearly a farce, with the comedian Peter Sellers playing three roles, it was criticized for being implausible.

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