Tag Archives | MRI

Magnets Can Influence Heat and Sound

Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered how to control heat with a magnetic field. An experiment proved that the phonon--the elementary particle that carries heat and sound--has magnetic properties. This artist's rendering, based on computer simulations, depicts a phonon heating solid material. Atoms of the material, shown in orange, are joined with flexible atomic bonds, shown as springs. The phonon imparts heat by colliding with the center atom, creating a vibration in the springs. The trail of the passing phonon is marked with increased magnetic field intensity, shown in green. The figure in the lower right shows the direction of the applied magnetic field. The researchers found that a sufficiently strong magnetic field can cause phonons to collide with each other and be deflected off-course, which slows the flow of heat through the material. Credit: Image by Renee Ripley, courtesy of The Ohio State University.

Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered how to control heat with a magnetic field. 
Credit: Image by Renee Ripley, courtesy of The Ohio State University.

I think my stereo’s speakers proved that last one, but anyway, via ScienceDaily:

Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered how to control heat with a magnetic field.

In the March 23 issue of the journal Nature Materials, they describe how a magnetic field roughly the size of a medical MRI reduced the amount of heat flowing through a semiconductor by 12 percent.

The study is the first ever to prove that acoustic phonons — the elemental particles that transmit both heat and sound — have magnetic properties.

“This adds a new dimension to our understanding of acoustic waves,” said Joseph Heremans, Ohio Eminent Scholar in Nanotechnology and professor of mechanical engineering at Ohio State. “We’ve shown that we can steer heat magnetically.

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Brain Scan Can Tell If A Smoker Will Quit

If your New Years resolution is to quit smoking every year, there may be scientific proof as to why you never seem to be able to follow through with it. Or you can keep telling yourself, “I’ll quit tomorrow.” The Vancouver Sun reports:

U.S. researchers have found a way to predict how successful a smoker will be at quitting by using an MRI scan to look for activity in a region of the brain associated with behaviour change.

The scans were performed on 28 heavy smokers who had joined an anti-smoking program, according to the study published Monday in the peer-reviewed journal Health Psychology.

Participants were asked to watch a series of commercials about quitting smoking while a magnetic resonance imaging machine scanned their brains for activity.

[Continues at The Vancouver Sun]

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