Tag Archives | Music

What kind of metal is this? Why, I believe it’s Thelemite!

Disinfonauts,

heislegend-heavyfruitI am pleased as punch to see that my favorite band, He Is Legend, are due to release their 4th full length album “Heavy Fruit” on August 19th.  Their style of rock weighs heavy with whiskey, cigarettes, and magick overtones.  Over the course of their career, their sound has progressed with a kind of southern fried metal that satisfies on a visceral level while conveying well articulated lyrics.  Many themes in the new record revolve around the witchery of them womenfolk in all of their good and malevolent ways.  Schulyar Croom’s voice is like gilded razor wire as he swaggers through track after track.  I hope you enjoy their new work as much as I do and pick up a copy of their album, come August 19th.

 

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July 23rd, 1973 – A Chaos Magick Film

Like Chapel Supremesus of Facebook for info on future shows/films

Artist’s Statement:

Modern masters like Alan Moore have often said that “art is magick because art transforms consciousness.” Although there are an increasing amount of psychedelic bands and visual artists working in the medium, none that I’m currently aware of take to their craft with the specific intent of potentially inducing spiritual epiphany in the viewer/listener, which is what the Occult films of Chapel Supremesus (myself and Dean Swanson) strive for. It’s a path I personally started treading at around age 19 by throwing cut-up, mind-fuck mixes together with a $100 sampler and a cheap cassette 4 track. At the time I was years away from my Occult awakening, but crafting bedroom auditory sorcery solely for the purpose of warping my own internal microverse struck me as the most natural way of communing with the great beyond that I could think of.… Read the rest

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The Irreverent, Allegorical, Satirical, Psychedelic Opus That is Closure in Moscow’s Pink Lemonade.

Journey deep down the rabbit hole with Closure in Moscow and their allegorical, psychedelic opus that’s soaked in a perfectly balanced brine technology and satire.

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pink lemonadeThere’s no group of creatives that has it tougher than today’s musicians. Their craft is exceedingly simple to steal, consume, judge, then cast aside like yesterday’s Hot n’ Ready crust (what this shockingly red handed dork who looks like he went straight from a wedding to reviewing a 5 dollar pizza doesn’t tell you is that it’s the most inexcusable food of all time).

To be fair, we have a right to be skeptical. The vast majority of today’s music is formulaic, predictable, shallow, devoid of any deeper meaning and often crafted for the sole purpose of grabbing the attention of the nearest industry turd. Then there are bands like my guests, Closure in Moscow.

Closure has always leaned toward the “all-in” approach with their music, but their latest release, Pink Lemonade, pushes the chips forward like nothing I’ve ever heard before.Read the rest

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Rock N’ Roll Samizdat: Soviet Era Bootleg Records Pressed From X-Ray Film

xrayLaughing Squid shares several remarkable examples of Soviet era audio samizdat. Neat stuff. Kind of spooky looking, too. Click through the link below to see the rest.

With vinyl scare and various western music genres like rock and roll and jazz banned in 1950s Soviet Russia, enterprising music fans would create records using X-ray film discarded by doctors and hospitals. The records were cut with scissors — often unevenly — with a cigarette hole burned through the middle of the platter and the music itself pressed onto the film using a special recording device. The result is a “multimedia” record that, when held up to light, reveals the skeletal structure left over from the film’s original use.

via A Series of Banned Rock and Jazz Records Pressed Onto Discarded X-Rays in 1950s Soviet Russia.

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Defending The Indefensible: David Bowie’s Eighties Career

David-bowie-lets-danceAre you a Bowie fan? I’m a big fan, and have been since I was a little boy who stayed up late one night to watch him perform live on HBO. What tour was this? “Serious Moonlight”. Yes, I can hear you groaning.

As a dedicated Bowie fan myself, I know that you’re more likely than not to cite an album like “Low” or “Hunky Dory” as favorite. Certainly not “Let’s Dance”. You might even prefer to think that an inferior clone stood in for Bowie from 1981 to 1986 while he went back to Berlin to do more heroin and pretend he was a wizard.

That disdain is a fine example of how we condemn him for continuing the chameleon-like musical career that  made him so well known while we praise him for it, and resent his success while bemoaning the lack of “good” music on the radio. Then we’ll turn around and praise the pop sensibilities of whatever ash-choked miserablist steps out of the local college rock station toting a guitar and a properly surly attitude.… Read the rest

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Baby Got Bach: Sir Mix-A-Lot Performs With The Seattle Symphony Orchestra

“Now in its third year, Seattle Symphony’s critically acclaimed Sonic Evolution project creates a bridge between the Symphony and Seattle’s storied reputation as launching pad for some of the most creative musicians on the popular music scene. Each year, in celebration of the past, present and future of our city’s musical legacy, Ludovic Morlot and the Seattle Symphony commission world-class composers to write orchestral world premieres inspired by bands and artists that launched from, or are related to, Seattle.

In addition to writing a brand new composition inspired by Seattle’s own Sir Mix-A-Lot, composer Gabriel Prokofiev also orchestrated two of the legendary rapper’s most famous hits for this year’s concert, including “Baby Got Back,” for which Sir Mix-A-Lot joined Ludovic Morlot and the Orchestra on stage at Benaroya Hall.”

Hat tip: Neatorama

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A Disconcerting Concert: Animus and Anima in Beethoven’s Emperor Concerto

BeethovenMusicologists maintain that, in the history of classical music, the symphony and the sonata are the more ambitious form of composition. In effect, the concerto for one or more instruments and orchestra is inevitably more theatrical, often promoting, rather than music per se, vacuous virtuosity. But Beethoven’s “Emperor” concerto for piano and orchestra elevates the generally facile juxtaposition between soloist and orchestra to an accomplished integration of Animus and Anima, sun and moon, the two opposing elements of the universe in a triumphantly réussi instance of coniunctio oppositorum.

The following — whose style is intended as a tribute to Hector Berlioz’s A Critical Study of Beethoven’s Symphonies — should encourage the reader to go back to the source, i.e., the concerto itself, whether it be the first time you listen to it, or the umpteenth.

Beethoven’s Klavierkonzert No. 5 [Piano Concerto No. 5 in E flat major Op. 73 (“Emperor”)] is the prototype of concerting perfection.… Read the rest

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The Wendy Carlos Multiphonic Keyboard And The Museum Of Imaginary Instruments

The altogether delightful Museum of Imaginary Instruments features not-quite-yet-real musical devices that hover at the boundaries of physical law and the human senses. Take, for instance, electronica pioneer Wendy Carlos’s dream keyboard of the new era:

Wendy Carlos is best known as a pioneer of the synthesizer who reached mass audiences with soundtrack for Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange (1971). While never-before-heard timbres were a stunning feature of these works, Carlos also pursued another avenue opened up by synthesizers: the development of new tunings. Based on a design by R. H. M. Bosanquet from 1875, her proposed generalized keyboard divided the octave into 53 equal steps, strategically arranged so as to make all regular divisions of the octave playable. Carlos wrote. Alas, like the shift to meantone Carlos expected to see as digital synthesizing equipment became more common, the keyboard was not to be.

multiphonic keyboard

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Why Wu-Tang Will Release Just One Copy Of Its Secret Album

wu tangYou have to admit, the latest idea from RZA and the Wu Tang Clan is going to start a debate that’s well worth having: should an album of recorded music be prized as a unique work of art in the same way as a painting? From Forbes:

Somewhere on the outskirts of Marrakech, Morocco, inside a vault housed beneath the shadow of the Atlas Mountains, there sits an engraved silver-and-nickel box with the potential to spawn a shift in the way music is consumed and monetized.

The lustrous container was handcrafted over the course of three months by British-Moroccan artist Yahya, whose works have been commissioned by royal families and business leaders around the world. Soon, it will contain a different sort of art piece: the Wu-Tang Clan’s double-album The Wu – Once Upon A Time In Shaolin, recorded in secret over the past few years.

Like the work of a master Impressionist, it will truly be one-of-a-kind—in lieu of a traditional major label or independent launch, the iconic hip-hop collective will make and sell just one copy of the album.

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A 1969 Visit To The Shoreditch Experimental Music School

Welcome to the Shoreditch Experimental Music School – I would give anything to have had an elementary school experience along these lines. This amazing Peter Fletcher-hosted BBC program from 1969 reveals the cutting edge of experimental art education. Highlights include kids learning about tape loops, a music piece about the concept of heat, and a deeply disturbing masked group performance about cholera death:
Children from infant, secondary modern & comprehensive schools apply methods of contemporary music, including demonstrations of simple tape & electronic techniques. The children discuss with teacher how different sounds may be produced and experiment with electric circuits and loops on the tape recorder.
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