Tag Archives | Music

You Are Heroic, Unending, Mercurial Potential! Featuring Musical Mystic, Chris de Cinque of Closure in Moscow

Chris de Cinque is a well read man with a cheeky, verbose spirit. He also sings for the proggy, satire-soaked, mercurial quintet, Closure in Moscow. Their critically-acclaimed opus, Pink Lemonade (without a doubt one of my favorite records of last year) proves it’s possible to grapple with heavy themes like enlightenment and transhumanism all whilst maintaining a deep sense of fourth-wall breaking sarcasm complete with what sound suspiciously like boner noises (see the full album stream below).



Hear our first conversation with the Closure in Moscow boys here. 

The courage to forsake the armor your persona provides and expose your tender vulnerabilities to other humans is a terrifying, intimidating, yet irreplaceably vital thing. When you do summon up the bravery take that leap, you’re truly doing the no less than holy work of shrinking the gaps between you and your fellow man. Disabling your social forcefield allows compassion and understanding flow.Read the rest

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Music As Medicine

“Biometric trackers are helping scientists tap into the body’s response to songs and sound,” suggesting there is a way to measure whether or not music can function as medicine, reports the Atlantic:

“Because you listened to Drake, how about Future next?”

Sinnliche Töne [Explored]

Photo: Tekke (CC)


Pandora, Spotify, and other music-streaming services try to predict what users might like to listen to, based on their tastes and what’s popular with people near them. People make playlists for certain moods and activities—going to the gym, going to bed. But imagine if those apps could predict exactly which song would be best to help you focus, or to slow your heart rate after a run. (“You seem stressed. How about Sigur Ros?”) And if technology could predict how music affects the body, could it suggest music to treat symptoms of a disease?

That idea is the basis of The Sync Project, a new company based in Boston.

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Cleopatra Records’ Necronomicon of the Occult

The limited edition box-set “includes tracks from The Soft Moon, VOWWS, Bestial Mouths, Magic Wands (remixed by The XX) side by side with classic tracks from Nico, Christian Death, Peter Murphy, Tangerine Dream and Joy Division, as well as many others.” Release date is May 12, 2015.

You can pre-order here.

7” Vinyl (Black, Blue, Red, or Clear)
(Aleister Crowley – Aside: The Pentagram / Bside: The Call of the AEthyr)
5 CD Wallets
(Including non-stop mix by Tamara Sky)
12 Page Full Color Booklet
Pendant & Chain
2 Collectable Postcards

h/t Broadway World

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Space Dragon on Project Bring Me to Life

Selomon and Shannon interview producer and musician Space Dragon on Project Bring Me to Life podcast #46:

Space Dragon is the Executive producer of Drunk Yoga, Bar Wars (rap battle league), and the Imminent Disclosure Festival. He is currently living in Honolulu working as the producer for Quantum University where he does the video content for all of their online classes and degree programs.

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Hip Hop Beats Beatles As Most Influential In 50 Years of Pop Music

If you were asked what was the most important development in pop music in the last 50 years, what would you pick? An evolutionary biologist who normally studies worms looked at 17,000 songs on Billboard’s Hot 100 over 50 years and found that hip hop beats out the British Invasion of 1964, Beatles, Stones ‘n all. From the LA Times:

Forget the Beach Boys, Michael Jackson and Madonna. The most important cultural shift in American pop music began with the explosion of rap in the early 1990s.

Public Enemy 4

The Beatles and the Rolling Stones didn’t spark the British Invasion of the 1960s, but they did fan its flames.

And don’t buy snobs’ complaints about the homogenization of pop. With the exception of a brief period in the 1980s, there’s been plenty of diversity in the charts.

These are the conclusions of engineers and biologists who analyzed 17,000 digitized songs from Billboard’s Hot 100 to produce an evolutionary history of American popular music — no listening required.

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Holly Herndon [Past : Forward]

This post was originally published on four by three magazine by Giuseppe Zevolli.

Are artists, consumers and critics guilty of a stubborn addiction to the past? Or have we become too obsessed with the new?
Music critic Giuseppe Zevolli ties American artist Holly Herndon’s forthcoming album Platform – to be released on May 18th – to the wider phenomenon of nostalgia for the past and the future of music, while confronting her experimental compositions in the here and now.

herndon album coverSan Francisco based electronic musician Holly Herndon does not have much time for nostalgia. In her view it is better spent on reviving the ‘world-making’ potential of music and do away with pre-existing tropes. On her track Unequal, off of her upcoming album Platform [RVNG Intl. & 4AD], a male voice recites:

To change the shape of our future/To be unafraid to break away

A climactic rush of shuddering electronica accompanied by meditative, pitch-errant vocals, the song tackles social inequality, while those two verses – echoing the manifesto-like messages appearing in her video for Interference – could equally be seen to encapsulate her aesthetics as a whole.… Read the rest

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Al-Namrood album artwork

Way More Metal Than You Are.

Do you know what’s totally metal? Being in a Black Metal band, but being unable to perform. Because if you do play a gig, you could wind up with your head chopped off.

That’s what the metal lifestyle is like in Saudia Arabia, as this Vice interview with ‘Mephisto’  from Black Metal band Al-Namrood attests. Read on, headbangers:

Black metal bands have never been keen on religion. However, in parts of the world where religion can actually be oppressive, bands inspired by Bathory and Mayhem and Burzum are few and far between.

That’s presumably because it’s a lot easier to be in an anti-Christian metal band in the US, than in an anti-Islamic metal band in Saudi Arabia. In America, your obstacles extend to overhearing your mom tell a friend you’re just “going through a phase.” In Saudi Arabia, you face social ostracism and the possibility of imprisonment or death.

With that in mind, you’ve got to give it to Saudi Arabia’s only black metal band, Al-Namrood, whose lyrics include all sorts of things that could get them executed.

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Kanye West on The Illuminati

In a very long monologue at Paper Magazine, Kanye West bares his soul and speaks about all sorts of things without much inhibition, including this on celebrities and the illuminati:

I heard a comment — a joke — about the Tidal press conference being an Illuminati moment. If there was actually an Illuminati, it would be more like the energy companies. Not celebrities that gave their life to music and who are pinpointed as decoys for people who really run the world. I’m tired of people pinpointing musicians as the Illuminati. That’s ridiculous. We don’t run anything; we’re celebrities.

Kanye West 03

Kanye West by rodrigoferrari (CC)


We’re the face of brands. We have to compromise what we say in lyrics so we don’t lose money on a contract. Madonna is in her 50s and gave everything she had to go up on an award show and get choked by her cape.

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Synesthetic Art: Artist Paints What She Hears

John Lennon – Imagine [Listen]

John Lennon – Imagine [Listen]

Artist Melissa S. McCracken has synesthesia, a phenomena in which sounds, mathematical numbers, and other abstract concepts evoke specific colors. Because McCracken finds it frustrating trying to describe the phenomenon, she has decided to paint what she hears. She explains at Bored Panda:

Synesthesia, although not disorientating, can sometimes leave me at odds trying to describe what I can see to others.

Painting in oils and acrylics is a way to express and exhibit the beautiful colors that I see on a day to day basis, whether it’s hearing someone’s name, or that song on the radio. I paint a variety of artists from Led Zeppelin to Stevie Wonder.

Radiohead - Bodysnatchers [Listen]

Radiohead – Bodysnatchers [Listen]

According to her bio:

“I paint music.

Until I was 15, I thought everyone constantly saw colors. Colors in books, colors in math formulas, colors at concerts.

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