Tag Archives | Music

Crickets’ Singing Slowed Down Sounds Like A Human Choir

cricketsVia Enpundit the unsettling realization that the sound of insects resembles our singing, if you know how to listen:
Composer Jim Wilson has recorded the sound of crickets and then slowed down the recording, revealing something so amazing. The crickets sound like they are singing the most angelic chorus in perfect harmony. The recording contains two tracks played at the same time: The first is the natural sound of crickets played at regular speed, and the second is the slowed down version of crickets’ voices. “I discovered that when I slowed down this recording to various levels, this simple familiar sound began to morph into something very mystic and complex……..almost human.”
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The Evolution of Ministry’s Al Jourgensen

jourgensen-and-jourgensen

Via Intonarumoron:

The first two Ministry albums I heard were With Sympathy and Filth Pig. I can’t remember which one I got first, but they sounded completely different not just from each other, but from what I expected Ministry to sound like — something like Skinny Puppy or Nine Inch Nails.

How did Ministry begin with such pop roots and emerge as a heavy metal band? Jourgensen has claimed he was forced by the record company and his producers to create a pop album. Others have speculated that he discovered hardcore punk later in life and was converted.

“The singer has been accused of punk posturing on the video for ‘Stigmata,’ which has him decked out in skinhead garb and wallowing in a pile of trash,” the Phoenix Times wrote in 1988, following the release of The Land of Rape and Honey.

Neither version of the story is true. And while skipping straight from “Revenge” to “No W” would be quite a shock, there’s actually a steady progression in the sound over the years.

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Haunting Voices of the Past: Ancient Greek Music Reconstructed

Delphi: ApollEver wonder what Greek music sounded like circa 450 BC? Well, a bunch of smart people came together and figured out vocal notation on Greek pottery. Voila. The ghosts of the ancient world sing again.

via Open Culture via BBC:

[Ancient Greek] instruments are known from descriptions, paintings and archaeological remains, which allow us to establish the timbres and range of pitches they produced.

And now, new revelations about ancient Greek music have emerged from a few dozen ancient documents inscribed with a vocal notation devised around 450 BC, consisting of alphabetic letters and signs placed above the vowels of the Greek words.

The Greeks had worked out the mathematical ratios of musical intervals – an octave is 2:1, a fifth 3:2, a fourth 4:3, and so on.

The notation gives an accurate indication of relative pitch.

David Cleese, a classicist from the University of Newcastle, brings this notation to life through this recording. Listen here: What Ancient Greek Music Sounded Like

If you like this sort of thing, be sure to check out Hear the Epic of Gilgamesh Read in the Original Akkadian, where the sounds of ancient Mesopotamia reach out from the past, and speak to us again.… Read the rest

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The Misfits’ Jerry Only at New York Comic Con

I really wasn’t expecting to bump into Jerry Only and his Misfits bandmate Chupacabra (yeah, yeah, I know, it’s not the original line-up) at New York Comic Con, but that’s part and parcel of the madness of that event. I don’t do many music industry interviews (and this one was spur of the moment with zero prep time, and entirely off the top of my head to boot) but I rose to the occasion and did the best I could under the circumstances. Chupacabra doesn’t talk much, by the way. Hope you enjoy, Disinfonauts.

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Bypassing the Rational: An Interview with Artist and Writer Sean Woodward

Baron Cemeterie

Baron Cemeterie

Sean Woodward is a visionary artist, writer, poet and musician whose work incorporates  aspects of Vodoun, Thelema and Chaos Magick, among other things. You can learn more about him and his work here.

 

Aonie Anfa: Thanks so much for the opportunity to speak with you. Your art started popping up among my friends about three months ago. It’s very compelling, visionary yet visceral. So I took a look, and found my way to a lot of great, boutique presses and publications like Scarlet Imprint. And of course, your art. Your work with Gnostic Vodoun helps bring about, in my opinion, a much needed period of new, fresh influence for the current.

Sean Woodward: As a child I inherited artistic abilities from both parents and honed a skill for portraiture landscape and pen and ink. Over the years this became dormant as I concentrated on writing and music projects with my band Gothick.… Read the rest

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The Musical Universe

Via orwellwasright:

What is it about music that moves us in so many different ways? The rhythm begins and we slide onto the dancefloor, gyrating to the beats; a guitar strikes a chord and we throw ourselves into the crowd, surfing across a sea of hands; a favourite song comes on the radio and we sing along at the top of our voices, oblivious to the looks of bemusement coming from other drivers stuck in the traffic jam. The right songs can change the way we feel in an instant, as effective as the mood pills consumed in Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

I recently had the good fortune to attend a live performance of Beethoven’s legendary 9th Symphony. While it is something of a cliché - and perhaps exaggeration – to call this “the greatest music ever written” it’s certainly an intensely powerful experience which has endured the test of time, remaining one of the most popular pieces on the classical repertoire.… Read the rest

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Heads-up to the festival community, thieves are working the circuit; here is one of their scams

via chycho

BassCoast201217

  1. The Festival
  2. The Setting
  3. The Scam
  4. The Outcome
  5. How to Protect Yourself

I. The Festival

I was lucky enough to win tickets through ION Magazine to attend Bass Coast, an international electronic arts music festival that’s been held in British Columbia, Canada since 2009. My many thanks to Ion Magazine for partnering with Bass Coast to give away tickets and to the organizers for putting together this amazing event, I will definitely be attending again. For those interested, the following video featuring some of the musicians and artists that have attended the festival is a great introduction to what awaits you.

Unfortunately, no matter how amazing an event turns out to be, there are always bad elements present. The best festivals are ones that promote a sense of culture and community, it’s the best way to ensure safety and security, a central theme for Bass Coast. Even with the amazing vibe of this gathering, some minor predators ended up filtering through.… Read the rest

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Music Video: ‘Fight For Everyone’

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to have omnipotent powers of creation, and to do it all through touch screen abilities?

‘Fight For Everyone’ Music Promo from Persistent Peril on Vimeo.

‘Fight For Everyone’ music promo for The Leisure Society.

A hand creates life on a little bluey-greeny planet, only things don’t quite go as planned. Miniature animated destruction ensues.

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Who Killed The Music Industry?

Genesis Live 01An interesting interactive journey through the death of the music industry from Pando Daily:

Since 2000, the amount of revenue created from selling or streaming music in America has been cut in half, from $14.3 billion to $7 billion, according to that most despised trade organization, the Recording Industry Association of America, or RIAA. And yet listeners have more access to music than ever, and there’s nothing to suggest that demand for music is down.

So what or who is to blame?

Is it Apple’s fault for launching iTunes and forever severing songs from albums? Is it the record executives’ fault who, facing this shift from $17 albums to $0.99 singles, continued to rely on old, byzantine licensing and sales models, even as their industry hemorrhaged money before their eyes? Is Internet piracy to blame, with Napster forever changing the way we find and consume music, and BitTorrent bringing about the record industry’s worst nightmare?

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