Music


algoraveCan all digitally-created music really just be thought of as humans manipulating algorithms? If so, why not get to the heart of things? A burgeoning, extremely nerdy subculture called algorave revolves around generating, altering, and combining electronic sound loops via on-the-spot coding, using languages such as SuperCollider, with the coding projected on a large screen. Could this be the worst new form of music, or the most honest? Wikipedia writes:

An algorave is an event where people dance to music generated from algorithms, often using live coding techniques. Algoraves can include a range of styles, including a complex form of minimal techno, and has been described as a meeting point of hacker philosophy, geek culture, and clubbing.

The first self-proclaimed “algorave” was held as a warmup concert for the SuperCollider Symposium 2012. The first North American algorave took place in Hamilton, Ontario during the artcrawl of 9 August 2013.


cricketsVia Enpundit the unsettling realization that the sound of insects resembles our singing, if you know how to listen:

Composer Jim Wilson has recorded the sound of crickets and then slowed down the recording, revealing something so amazing. The crickets sound like they are singing the most angelic chorus in perfect harmony.

The recording contains two tracks played at the same time: The first is the natural sound of crickets played at regular speed, and the second is the slowed down version of crickets’ voices.

“I discovered that when I slowed down this recording to various levels, this simple familiar sound began to morph into something very mystic and complex……..almost human.”






Via orwellwasright: What is it about music that moves us in so many different ways? The rhythm begins and we slide onto the dancefloor, gyrating to the beats; a guitar strikes a…





An interesting interactive journey through the death of the music industry from Pando Daily: Since 2000, the amount of revenue created from selling or streaming music in America has been cut in…



The natural/ethereal beauty of this music video, matched with the hauntingly mellow music bring about ideas of making it through a shamanic ordeal or something like that. Elk Grass from awesome and…


We all know that the United States’ National Security Agency (NSA) is monitoring social network and other communications activity, so New York Times music critic Jon Pareles takes issue with Jay-Z’s deal…




via The Quietus Next week, City Slang are giving Anna von Hausswolff’s second album of dark-hued, cinematic pop Ceremony a worldwide release. Says von Hausswolff of the album: “I didn’t just want…


via Smithsonian Amid the collection of thugs, sycophants, stone-eyed killers and over-promoted incompetents who comprised the wartime leadership of Nazi Germany, Joseph Goebbels stood out. For one thing, he was genuinely intelligent—he had earned…


via Sick Chirpse! Do you like porn? Do you like music? Then you’ll love this album from Hometape. My housemate spent the best part of his second year at University watching hours-upon-hours…




Performance artist and opera singer Joseph Keckler unveils an epic, original Italian operatic aria that explores the dizzying highs and lows of a tumultuous psilocybin experience. Visuals provided by Sifl and Olly creator Liam Lynch:



Terence McKenna may be due for a posthumous appearance on the hip-hop charts, as a sample of the philosopher leads off one of the songs on the new Trap God 2 mixtape from Atlanta rapper Gucci Mane. Gucci is one of the leading proponents of the so-called “trap” style that has been the dominant sound in rap for the past year or so, and the McKenna quote serves as a manifesto of sorts. The track in question is the work of star producer Lex Luger: