Tag Archives | Mysticism

The Eternal Quest: Manly P. Hall and the Holy Grail

holy-grail“This is my quest
To follow that star
No matter how hopeless
No matter how far

To fight for the right
Without question or pause
To be willing to march into Hell
For a heavenly cause” 

– (lyrics from The Impossible DreamMan of La Mancha)

Bridgekeeper: Stop. What… is your name?
Galahad: Sir Galahad of Camelot.
Bridgekeeper: What… is your quest?
Galahad: I seek the Grail.
Bridgekeeper: What… is your favourite colour?
Galahad: Blue. No, yel…
[he instantly gets flung off the bridge]

Monty Python and the Holy Grail

In her book The Myths We Live By, philosopher Mary Midgley describes myths as not mere lies or fairy tales, but as networks “of powerful symbols that suggest particular ways of interpreting the world.”  In other words, a myth is more accurately an image/understanding of the world, and doesn’t have to begin “once upon a time…

But when in that myth-form, like those of our more ancient “myths,” we in modern times become lost in literalist interpretations and squabbles – and lost are the deeper truths they have to offer.  … Read the rest

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It’s Groundhog Day All over Again! – Living in the Era of the Ontological Movie

peake“It’s like The Matrix, isn’t it?” We’ve heard the phrase many times and probably said it ourselves. We live in a time when mind-bending perspectives on the nature of reality are both commonly abroad in the culture as well as entertained by cutting-edge scientists. But it wasn’t always the case.

The mainstream success of movies such as The Matrix, Groundhog Day, and Inception have spread the word that was previously only heard by philosophers, hippies and adherents of eastern mysticism. So, what does it mean to live in the age of the ontological movie?

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John and Yoko: Dreaming Reality

"Bed-In for Peace, Amsterdam 1969 - John Lennon & Yoko Ono 02" by Nationaal Archief, Den Haag, Rijksfotoarchief: Fotocollectie Algemeen Nederlands Fotopersbureau (ANEFO), 1945-1989 - negatiefstroken zwart/wit, nummer toegang, bestanddeelnummer 922-2304 - Nationaal Archief. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 nl via Wikimedia Commons.

Bed-In for Peace, Amsterdam 1969 – John Lennon & Yoko Ono 02” by Nationaal Archief, Den Haag, Rijksfotoarchief: Fotocollectie Algemeen Nederlands Fotopersbureau (ANEFO), 1945-1989 – negatiefstroken zwart/wit, nummer toegang, bestanddeelnummer 922-2304 – Nationaal Archief. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 nl via Wikimedia Commons.

When journalist David Sheff began tenaciously pursuing all possible channels to reach out to John and Yoko in hopes that they would sit for a Playboy interview in 1980, he never would have imagined that the decision might come down to the time and place of his own birth—the interview, after all, would hinge on how Yoko would interpret his horoscope.

A little surprising, perhaps, for the wife of a man like John Lennon, whose attitude toward faith often resembled the sneer he wears on the cover of “Rock ‘N’ Roll“. His massive post-Beatles single “Imagine” has been called an atheist anthem by some and even replaced “Kumbaya” once at an atheist summer camp for kids.… Read the rest

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Aleister Crowley was a Total Hack Magickian. Just my Opinion.

dowhatthouwiltAbout a month ago Marcie asked me to design a Disinfo.com magick poll and I came up with a quick one in like 5 minutes. I wish I would have put more thought into it and included people like John Dee, Peter Carroll, and Lon Milo Duquette but, you know, I admittedly half assed it and fired off an e-mail all quick like. It’s not like this is something I had been contemplating or planning on writing about at the time.

Here’s where I confess that the topic chosen was ultimately designed to help me gauge whether the modern Occultists I look up to and respect have exceeded the popularity of the self-proclaimed “great beast” Aleister Crowley. It was my suspicion that they hadn’t, but even I was sort of disappointed that Crowley got more votes than both Alan Moore and Grant Morrison combined (Moore edged out Morrison by 2 votes and they came in at #2 and #3 respectively).… Read the rest

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The Cosmic Trigger Play and Find the Others Conferestival Kicks Off This Weekend

cosmictriggerShould be noted that the crowdfunding campaign was a rousing success, and my favorite book about summoning aliens with your privates is coming to a stage in Liverpool this Sunday, November 23rd (of course) and again in London the following weekend. Not only that but there’s going to be an epic “Conferestival” on Saturday to kick things into the upper echelons of high strangeness. Apparently, some of my collage sigils even made it into the tantric sex sequence of the play, which is magickally appropriate. To say that I’m more than a bit honored by this creative decision would be a massive understatement. If only I was a richer man who could justify spending my money on such a trip, I’d be there in a heartbeat, but alas it is not to be at this point in my life. Apparently they might make it to the states here if it’s successful enough (come to Seattle) but if you happen to live in the UK, make it fucking so.… Read the rest

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The Irreverent, Allegorical, Satirical, Psychedelic Opus That is Closure in Moscow’s Pink Lemonade.

Journey deep down the rabbit hole with Closure in Moscow and their allegorical, psychedelic opus that’s soaked in a perfectly balanced brine technology and satire.


pink lemonadeThere’s no group of creatives that has it tougher than today’s musicians. Their craft is exceedingly simple to steal, consume, judge, then cast aside like yesterday’s Hot n’ Ready crust (what this shockingly red handed dork who looks like he went straight from a wedding to reviewing a 5 dollar pizza doesn’t tell you is that it’s the most inexcusable food of all time).

To be fair, we have a right to be skeptical. The vast majority of today’s music is formulaic, predictable, shallow, devoid of any deeper meaning and often crafted for the sole purpose of grabbing the attention of the nearest industry turd. Then there are bands like my guests, Closure in Moscow.

Closure has always leaned toward the “all-in” approach with their music, but their latest release, Pink Lemonade, pushes the chips forward like nothing I’ve ever heard before.Read the rest

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Jack Kirby and Comic Book Mysticism

Jack KirbyYou may not recognize the name Jack Kirby, but if you’ve ever argued with your friends over who gets to be Cyclops when you were playing X-Men in your backyard, then you’ve been touched by his creations.

Jack “King” Kirby was a comic book artist/writer/creator between the 30s and the 70s, whose work is arguably the most influential in the medium.  He created and co-created some of the most recognizable superheroes: Captain America, Thor, the Silver Surfer, the Hulk, the X-men, the Fantastic Four, the New Gods, and on and on.

His era of the comic industry is marred by poor pay-rates and draconian business models, where more often than not, artists were handing over their creations for pennies, and were happy just to get their name in the credits.  To make any money at it, Kirby would sit at his drawing board for twelve to fourteen hours a day, pushing out four or five comics a month. … Read the rest

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Mitch Horowotiz: New Wave of Witch-Hunters Rising Around The World

HorowitzI discovered Occult America by Mitch Horowitz a few years ago and the book forever changed the way I write dark fantasy and horror. His eloquent and insightful approach to the study of the occult is fascinating. Mitch Horowitz is a nationally known writer, speaker, and publisher in alternative spirituality as well as vice-president and editor-in-chief at Tarcher/Penguin, the division of Penguin books dedicated to metaphysical literature. Deepak Chopra called his work “brilliant” and I would agree. Mitch and I talked about his new book as well as some of his other studies. We also discussed the impact of the Salem Witch Hysteria of 1692, a personal interest of mine. Let me introduce you to Mitch Horowitz.

You have a new book out, One Simple Idea: How Positive Thinking Reshaped Modern Life, and I was wondering if you could elaborate on your childhood and upbringing? You open the book with that story and I’m curious how that’s brought you to where you are today.Read the rest

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William Blake’s Super-Trippy Illustrations For ‘Paradise Lost’

BlakeSinDeathDevilOpen Culture spotlights William Blake’s surrealistic illustrations inspired by Milton’s Paradise Lost. Blake was a fascinating character: An Outsider Artist before there was such a term. A mystic, poet and cultural radical (a 19th century advocate of “free love” among other notions), one wonders why there haven’t been a successful biographical film about this revolutionary figure.



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Carl Jung called meaningful coincidences and parapsychological occurrences by the term “synchronicity,” but noted that some things are merely attributable to “probability of chance.” Writing on Reality Sandwich, Nick Meador wonders: do we know how to tell the difference?

In recent times the term “synchronicity” has become one of the trendiest words in circles that self-identify as conscious or transformative. The Internet contributed to this, no doubt, by exposing so many of us to schools of thought like Jungian psychology (the origin of synchronicity) that had been partially or totally omitted from general education programs. However, common discussion and application of the term doesn’t take into consideration the fact that the Internet and connected technologies are constantly influencing our perception of supposed synchronicities. When we evaluate these phenomena more closely, it becomes unclear whether we’re identifying them correctly or interpreting them in a useful way.

The word “synchronicity” first appeared in the 1950s, when Carl Jung brought it forth in the development of archetypal psychology.

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