Tag Archives | Mythology

Why The Gods Came To Earth

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[disinfo ed.'s note: Excerpted from The E.T. Chronicles: What Myths and Legends Tell Us About Human Origins by Rita Louise PhD and Wayne Laliberte MS.]

The biggest mystery associated with the gods is why they came here in the first place. There are a variety of theories as to why an advanced civilization would come to the Earth. The one that often surfaces is that there were problems on their home world such as overpopulation, pollution, or a shortage of natural resources. These issues could have caused a group of explorers to leave their planet and seek out new life and new civilizations. It could be that their home world was destroyed and a lucky few managed to escape. Perhaps the Galactic Federation of Planets needed to create a way station between heaven (Asgard) and hell (Hel). It does seem apparent from ancient sources that the subjugation of humankind was not their goal.… Read the rest

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Time is a Flat Circle: ‘True Detective’ as Psychodrama

true-detective-1Many will agree that HBO’s True Detective season 1 has been one of the more thought provoking episodic narratives of 2014. HBO has defined itself for some time now on distributing quality original content, leading the way in that regard, though Netflix is now entering the picture as a serious contender in its own right.

Nevertheless, there is something particularly daring about using the tried and true, rather old school cops and bad guys format for a character-piece.

What do I mean by that? Well, the case they are investigating does little more than provide us a mirror for the two “bad men,” our protagonists Rust and Marty. So if you’re looking to unlock the Keys to Carcosa, you’re going to be horribly frustrated with this series.

The Lange murder is just a Trojan Horse. The real story here is much richer and stranger: who are these men, and how did this murder change their lives?

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Jason Colavito Parodies Lovecraft And Ancient Aliens In ‘Cthulhu in World Mythology’

CiWMYou may already know Jason Colavito for his book The Cult of Alien Gods: H.P. Lovecraft and Extraterrestrial Pop Culture, a skeptical look at the influence of the Cthulhu mythos on the development of ancient alien theories. (“…as some ancient alien theorists believe.” – Seriously. Take a shot every time they say that on the series. You’ll be stone drunk in 20 minutes.)

Via Suvudu:

Jason Colavito’s Cthulhu in World Mythology is a what-if work of speculative history that proposes that H.P. Lovecraft’s ancient god Cthulhu is real, and that humanity has worshiped him since the dawn of time.

Colavito discussed the surprising inspiration behind his book and the intersection between real-world mythology and Lovecraft’s mythos.

Get Cthulhu in World Mythology from Atomic Overmind Press: The eBook will be available late January and the print edition in February.

Tell me about Cthulhu in World Mythology. What’s it all about?

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The Stories of Our Lives: How Today’s Ideas Will Become Tomorrow’s Viral Mythology

Correa-Martians_vs._Thunder_ChildCitizens of the nation: I shall not try to conceal the gravity of the situation that confronts the country, nor the concern of your government in protecting the lives and property of its people…we must continue the performance of our duties each and every one of us, so that we may confront this destructive adversary with a nation united, courageous, and consecrated to the preservation of human supremacy on this earth….

—From Mercury Theatre on Air, War of the Worlds, 1938

             On Sunday, October 30, at 8 p.m., something happened that would send people all over the country into a panic. The year was 1938, and a radio broadcast came over the airwaves that would shock its listeners into running for the hills—well, those who weren’t able to tune in from the start and here Orson Welles say that he, on behalf of the Mercury Theatre on the Air, was about to present War of the Worlds by H.G.… Read the rest

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The Search for Hidden Truth In Story, Symbol and Form

Chartres - Westportal MonatsbilderBehind every origin story of ancient cultures and civilizations…behind every myth, every fairy tale and folklore and every religious text is an underlying layer of truth that describes the scientific knowledge and spiritual wisdom of the time. These amazing stories and myths may also hold a storehouse of hidden knowledge that matches today’s most cutting edge theories and discoveries. To those that came before us, where language was in its infancy and lacked today’s sophistication, the facts were, in fact, the story, and somehow, that story had to be considered important enough to go “viral” and spread from one culture to the next.

From the implicate and secret knowledge embedded in fairy tales, folklore and cosmogenesis stories, to the amazing science behind myth and religious writings from all over the world, what we have come to know as story contains more fact, more information, than we ever imagined. But that fact is often hidden behind a beginning, middle and an end, with a message, or a theme…a story meant to impart information even as it entertains or continues a heritage and legacy of a people from generation to generation.… Read the rest

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A Conversation with Richard Long, Author of ‘The Book of Paul’

LongGetting blurbed by Stephen King is the Holy Grail of the horror writer. If you don’t know what that means, it’s when an author (usually famous) reads your book and gives you a quote to put on the cover of your book to attract readers. For Stephen King to put his name on it, you know the book has to be outstanding. And when you’re talking about The Book of Paul, it is. I first heard Richard Long on a podcast and the way he described his book really caught my attention. He delves deeply into the occult, mythology, and astrophysics. As these are the same themes running through my books, especially The Portal Arcane series, I had to check it out. The Book of Paul does not disappoint. Long wrote it in a “cinematic” style that is fast-paced and streamlined. He doesn’t waste a lot of time on narrative description and his characters are so visceral you’ll swear you’ve been friends with them for years.… Read the rest

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Apocalyptic Imaginary: Best of Modern Mythology eBook

best-of_2011-ebook-frontThere is a limited time offer over at Modern Mythology: a free PDF of the 2011 “best of” anthology. It’s available as a direct link on the right sidebar of the site, and doesn’t require your email address (as many “free” eBooks do.)

More about the book:

This book captures and expands upon the unique commentary and analysis that has helped define the Modern Mythology project in 2011. Through the voices of many contributors, we collectively take a hard look at the blurred lines between narrative and truth, philosophy and literature, personal history and cultural memory. All of this is done with an eye towards the imagined apocalypse that is always just around the corner.

It’ll only be up there until the end of June, so nab it now. (Print edition.)

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Alan Moore and Psychogeography

Picture: Karen Karnak (CC)

Picture: Karen Karnak (CC)

Alan Moore interviews are always worth reading. Here he discusses psychogeography as it applies to various of his works.

via Reasons I Do Not Dance:

What exactly, in your not unlimited understanding, is Psychogeography?

In its simplest form I understand psychogeography to be a straightforward acknowledgement that we, as human beings, embed aspects of our psyche…memories, associations, myth and folklore…in the landscape that surrounds us. On a deeper level, given that we do not have direct awareness of an objective reality but, rather, only have awareness of our own perceptions, it would seem to me that psychogeography is possibly the only kind of geography that we can actually inhabit.

What books and writers ignited your interest in psychogeography?

The author that first introduced me to the subject was the person I regard as being its contemporary master, namely Iain Sinclair, with his early work Lud Heat.

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The Myth of the Lazy Youth

As we have seen time and time again, one of the challenges of modern myths is their relative invisibility. It is the outsiders of any age, those who are alien to their own times, that make the best artist shamans, and the same goes for mythic explorers. If you are too close to a culture, you will very frequently mistake the truisms of culture, the myths, as a fact. This is true with “human nature” (as we have seen), and it is also true with our myths of labor and work.

Let’s consider the example presented when one generation judges another,

“Twenge and Kasser analyzed data from the Monitoring the Future survey, which has tracked the views of a representative sample of 17- and 18-year-old Americans since 1976. They compared the answers to key questions given by high school seniors in 2005-2007 to those provided by previous generations.

To measure materialism, the youngsters were asked to rate on a one-to-four (“not important” to “extremely important”) scale how vital they felt it was to own certain expensive items: “a new car every two to three years,” “a house of my own (instead of an apartment or condominium),” “a vacation house,” and “a motor-powered recreational vehicle.” They were also asked straightforwardly how important they felt it was to “have a lot of money.”

To measure their attitudes toward work, the seniors rated on a one-to-five scale the extent to which they agreed with a series of statements, including “I expect my work to be a very central part of my life,” and “I want to do my best in my job, even if this sometimes means working overtime.”

The researchers found a couple of disturbing trends.

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Sinister Yoga

From Modern Mythology:

“Breathe in, hold in, breathe out, old, focus on purifying the mind and body with white light” — how many of you have heard this before? (Quite possibly while internalizing thoughts of lighting the teacher on fire as they use words like “sensation” as code for “agonizing, excruciating pain” as they twist you into a pretzel.)

Here at Modern Mythology we are often looking at the origin myths behind what has become rote practice. This may involve delving into etymological history or just conjecture about the possibilities that have since been forgotten. However, in this case, it seems that our work has been done for us. If you’d like to check out an alternative perspective on yoga and the myth of the yogi, check out David Gordon White’s “Sinister Yoga.” (This is not to say that alternative myths are not myths themselves.)

This approach challenges many of the preconceived Western notions of yoga.

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